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Gift  of  The 

Zion  Research 

Foundation 


THE  SWEDENBORG  CONCORDANCE. 


MORRISON    AND    GIBB,    PRINTERS,    EDINBURGH. 


THE 

SWEDENBORG  CONCORDANCE. 

A  COMPLETE  WORK  OF  REFERENCE  TO  THE 
THEOLOGICAL  WRITINGS 

OF 

BASED   ON  THE    ORIGINAL  LATIN   WRITINGS 
OF  THE  AUTHOR. 

(ComptlftJ,   (EtJttcH,   anti   ^Translate*   fog   tfje 

Rev.  JOHN  FAULKNER  POTTS,  B.A. 


Volume   II.     D  to  F. 


LONDON: 

SWEDENBORG      SOCIETY, 

(Instituted  1810) 

36,    BLOOMSBURY    STREET. 

18  90. 


<lj  r> 


Sin 

mvhh 


CONCORDANCE    TO    SWEDENBORG. 


Dagger.    Pugio. 

A.  8142.  They  sent  to  me  a  little  child,  with  a  dagger 
.  .  .     D.1283. 

M.  248.  (Such  married  partners)  appear  like  those  who 
are  fighting  with  daggers. 

T.  324.  Like  those  who  talk  in  a  friendly  way  .  .  . 
Imt  hold  a  dagger  behind  them  .  .  . 

Dagger.     Ska. 

D.  4494.  Some  can  kill  without  the  use  of  a  knife, 
sword's  point,  or  dagger. 

Dagon.     Dagon. 

S.  232.  The  god  of  the  Philistines  at  Ashdod  was 
Dagon  ( 1  Sam.  v. ),  who  was  like  a  man  above  and  a  fish 
below;  which  image  was  devised  because  a  man  =  in- 
telligence, and  a  fish  knowledge,  which  make  one. 

F.  52.  Dagon,  their  idol,  was  like  a  man  above  and  a 
fish  below  ;  by  which  was  represented  their  religion, 
which,  from  faith,  was  as  it  were  spiritual,  but  from 
having  no  charity,  was  merely  natural.    P.  32612.  T.  2032. 

T.  7 13.  No  more  power  than  Dagon  the  idol  of  the 
Philistines  at  Ekron.     6302.     J.(Post.)lo. 


E.  70022.  The  reason  Dagon  the  god  of  the  Ashdodites 
was  cast  down  by  the  presence  of  the  ark,  his  head  and 
the  palms  of  his  hands  being  afterwards  thrown  upon 
the  threshold  of  his  house,  was  that  Dagon— their  re- 
ligiosity, which,  being  devoid  of  spiritual  good,  was  also 
devoid  of  all  intelligence  and  power  .  .  . 

81710.  Their  religiosity  was  represented  by  their  idol, 
which  was  called  Dagon,  set  up  at  Ashdod,  and  which, 
according  to  their  description,  was  fashioned  like  a  man 
from  the  head  to  the  navel,  and  like  a  fish  from  the 
navel  downwards.  Its  being  like  a  man  from  the  head 
to  the  navel,  represented  the  understanding  from  truths  ; 
and  its  being  like  a  fish  from  the  navel  downwards,  re- 
presented the  Natural  destitute  of  the  good  of  love  ; 
for  the  lower  part  of  the  body  down  to  the  knees  cor- 
responds to  celestial  love  ;  and  a  fish  to  the  natural  man, 
which  is  destitute  of  spiritual  good. 

Dahlborg.    d.  50312.  58114. 

Daily.     Quotidianus,  Quotidie. 

A.  2493.  The  more  interior  and  perfect  the  Angels  are, 
the  less  they  care  for  what  is  past,  or  think  about  what 
is  future  .  .  .  thus  they  are  free  from  cares  and  solicitudes. 

VOL.    II, 


This  is  what  is  meant  by  the  manna  being  received  from 
Heaven  daily,  and  by  the  daily  portion  of  bread  in  the 
Lord's  Prayer. 

283s4.  That  'daily,'  and  ' to-day '  =  what  is  perpetual, 
is  evident  from  the  sacrifice  taking  place  every  day.  On 
account  of  the  signification  of  'day,'  'daily,'  and  'to-day,' 
it  was  called  'the  continual,  or  perpetual  sacrifice.' 

8395.  That  spiritual  good  was  continually  given  them 
by  the  Lord,  without  any  care  or  assistance  of  theirs,  is 
signified  by  their  receiving  the  manna  daily  .  .  . 

8418.  The  reason  continually  is  signified,  is  that  they 
received  the  manna  daily. 

8478.  The  manna  being  given  every  morning,  and  that 
if  any  of  it  was  left  it  bred  worms  =  that  the  Lord  daily 
provides  necessaries  .  .  .  This  is  also  what  is  meant  by 
'the  daily  bread'  in  the  Lord's  Prayer.     J. (Post. )337. 


H.  593.  There   enter    Heaven   and 
number  of  some  thousands  daily. 


Hell 


to    the 


D.  361.  That  we  are  to  supplicate  daily  concerning 
the  Heavenly  Kingdom  .  .  . 

.   'Daily,'   in  the  Lord's   Prayer,    means    every 

moment.  Ex.  .  .  Hence  it  may  be  concluded  that  '  daily ' 
=  each  moment  in  successive  things  ;  but  in  the  simul- 
taneous things  (of  the  Angels)  it  is  turned  into  a  continual 
glorification  of  God  Messiah,  so  that  the  moments  are 
continuous  without  any  break  or  distinction  :  hence 
their  perceptions  and  happiness  ;  and  also  their  [faith] 
that  they  constantly  receive  everything  from  God  Messiah. 

Dainties.      Cupediae. 

A.  3502.  'Make  me  dainties  such  as  I  have  loved' 
(Gen.xxvii.4)  =  pleasant  things  thence,  because  from 
good.  '  Dainties  '  =  pleasant  things.  .  .  In  the  Original 
Language,  'dainties'  are  the  delights  and  pleasantnesses 
of  relish  ;  and,  in  the  internal  sense,  =  the  delights  which 
are  of  good  and  the  pleasant  things  which  are  of  truth  ; 
because  relish,  like  all  the  bodily  sensations,  corresponds 
to  celestial  and  spiritual  things. 

3512.  'Make  me  dainties'  (ver. 7)  =  the  longing  and 
delectation  from  the  pleasantness  therefrom.  'Dainties' 
=  pleasant  things  ;  thus,  the  longing  and  delectation 
from  the  pleasantness  therefrom,  namely,  from  truth.  Ex. 

3520.  '  I  will  make  them  dainties  for  thy  father,  such 
as  he  loveth'  (ver.  9)  =  that  it  will  make  deliciousness 
therefrom.       'Dainties '= pleasant    things    from   good. 


Damascus 


Dan 


They  are  here  called  deliciousnesses,  because  the  truths 
are  not  from  genuine,  but  from  domestic  good. 

[A.]  3589.  '  (Esau)  made  dainties  and  brought  them  to 
his  father'  (ver. 3 1 )  —  desirable  and  delectable  things  for 
the  Divine  Rational.  'Dainties'  =  the  delights  which  are 
of  good  and  the  pleasant  things  which  are  of  truth  :  the 
former  are  desirable,  and  the  latter  are  delectable  .  .  . 

S.  96b.  The  Word  is  like  a  garden  ...  in  which  there 
are  delicacies  and  deliciousnesses  of  every  kind  ;  deli- 
cacies from  the  fruits,  and  deliciousnesses  from  the  flowers 
.  .  .  The  man  who  is  in  Divine  truths  from  doctrine  .  .  . 
actually  enjoys  the  delicacies  and  deliciousnesses  there- 
from. 

T.  36 12.  This  state  of  man  may  be  compared  to  .  .  . 
delicacies  .  .  . 


E.  519.  Hence  what  is  savoury  =  the  delight  and 
pleasantness  of  wisdom  ;  and  dainties,  being  savoury,  = 
the  truths  which  are  of  wisdom. 

Damascus.     Damascus. 

A.  I232e.   'Damascus  has  been  rejected' (Is. xvii.  1 ). 

1715.  'He  pursued  them  even  to  Hobah,  which  is  on 
the  left  of  Damascus'  (Gen. xiv.  15)  =  extension  so  far.  .  . 
Damascus  was  the  chief  city  of  Syria  (2Sam.viii.5,6  ; 
Is.vii.8),  and  it  has  almost  the  same  signification  as 
Syria.  .  .  The  furthest  boundary  of  Canaan,  but  beyond 
Dan,  is  described  by  'Damascus'  (Amos v. 26, 27).  The 
boundary  of  the  Holy  Land,  or  of  the  Lord's  Kingdom, 
towards  the  north,  is  also  called  'the  boundary  of 
Damascus'  (Ezek.xlvii.  16-18  ;  xlviii.  1).     E.  1088. 

1796.   'Eliezer  of  Da.ma,scuB-Da?nascenus '  (Gen.xv.2) 
-the  external  Church.     Damascus  was  the  chief  city 
of  Syria,  where  had  been  the  remains  of  the  Ancient 
Church  .  .  . 


E.  37619.  'Damascus  was  thy  trader  .  .  .'  (Ezek.xxvii. 
18)  .  .  .  '  Damascus, '  being  a  city  of  Syria,  =  a  concordant 
Scientific  .  .  . 

91 112.  The  Knowledges  of  truth  and  good  destroyed 
.  .  .  are  here  signified  by  'Damascus'  (Is.xvii.3),  which 
is  treated  of  in  this  chapter. 

P.  P.  Is.  xvii.  On  those  who  place  religion  in  the 
knowledge  of  Knowledges  only,  which  is  'Damascus.' 

Jer.xlix.  On  those  who  pervert  the  Knowledges  of 
truth,  who  are  'Damascus.' 

Damn.     See  Co^T>^,m-davinare. 
Damsel.     See  Girl. 
Dan.    Dan. 

A.  259.  The  lowest  things  of  reason,  or  scientifics,  are 
also  meant  by  what  Jacob  prophesied  about  'Dan'  (Gen. 
xlix.  17). 

1 7 10.  'He  pursued  even  to  Dan '  (Gen. xiv.  14)  =  a  state 
of  purification.  .  .  'Even  to  Dan'  =  to  the  furthest 
boundary  of  the  Land  of  Canaan.  .  .  That  'Dan'  =  the 
furthest  boundaries,  or  the  outermost  borders  of  Canaan. 
111. 

3923.  'Therefore  she  called  his  name  Dan'  (Gen.xxx. 
6)  =  its  quality  .  .  .  which  is  in  the  name  'Dan,'  for  he 


was  so  called  from  'judging.'  Still,  the  name  involves 
the  things  signified  by  all  these  woi'ds  of  Rachel,  '  God 
hath  judged  me,  and  hath  also  heard  my  voice,'  that  is, 
the  good  of  life  and  the  Holy  of  faith  ;  also,  in  the 
supreme  sense,  the  Lord's  righteousness  and  mercy.  It 
is  this  general  principle  of  the  Church  which  is  signified 
by  'Dan,'  and  which  is  represented  by  the  tribe  named 
from  'Dan.'  This  general  principle  is  the  first  which 
is  to  be  affirmed  or  acknowledged,  before  a  man  can 
be  regenerated  or  become  the  Church.  Unless  these 
things  are  affirmed  and  acknowledged,  all  other  things 
of  faith  and  life  cannot  be  received  at  all .  .  .  Affirmation 
and  also  acknowledgment  is  the  first  general  principle 
with  the  man  who  is  being  regenerated,  but  it  is  the  last 
with  the  man  who  has  been  regenerated  ;  wherefore 
'Dan'  is  the  first  with  him  who  is  to  be  regenerated,  and 
'Joseph'  is  the  last ;  for  'Joseph'  is  the  spiritual  man 
himself:  but  with  him  who  is  regenerate,  'Joseph'  is 
the  first,  and  'Dan'  is  the  last  ;  because  he  who  is  to  be 
regenerated  commences  from  the  affirmation  that  it  is 
so,  namely,  the  Holy  of  faith  and  the  good  of  life  ; 
whereas  the  regenerate  man,  who  is  spiritual,  is  in 
spiritual  good  itself,  and  therefore  regards  as  last  that  it 
is  so  .  .  . 

2.  That  'Dan'=the  affirmative  which  is  to  be  the 

first  thing  when  a  man  is  being  regenerated.  111. 

.    'Dan,'  here  (Gen.  xlix)  =  the  affirmative  of  truth; 

of  which  affirmative  it  is  said  that  'he  shall  be  a  serpent 
upon  the  way,  and  an  asp  upon  the  path'  when  it  reasons 
about  truth  from  sensuous  things  .  .  . 

— ■ — 3.  In  Moses'  prophecy  about  the  twelve  tribes  : 
'  To  Dan  he  said,  Dan  is  a  lion's  whelp,  he  leapeth  forth 
from  Bashan' (Deut.xxxiii.22).  'A  lion' =  the  truth  of 
the  Church  .  .  .  hence  'a  lion's  whelp '  =  the  first  of 
truth,  which  is  affirmation  and  acknowledgment.  It  is 
said  'from  Bashan '=because  from  the  good  of  the 
Natural. 

.   'From  Dan'  (Jer.iv.i5)  =  the  truth  which  is  to 

be  affirmed. 

4.   'The  snorting  of  his  horses  is  heard  from  Dan' 

(Jer.viii.  16)  =  ratiocination  about  truth  from  a  non- 
affirmative. 

5.   'Dan'  (Ezek.xxvii.  19)  =  the  first  truths  which 

are  affirmed. 

6.   'God  liveth,  Dan,  and  the  way  of  Beersheba 

liveth'  (Amos  viii.  14)  =  that  he  is  in  the  negative  of  all 
things  of  faith  and  its  doctrine.  The  reason  it  =  a 
negative  of  all  things  of  faith,  is  that  Dan  was  the  last 
boundary  of  Canaan,  and  Beersheba  the  first,  or  the 
inmost  of  the  Land.  .  .  Therefore,  when  all  things  in 
one  complex  were  signified,  it  was  said  'from  Dan  even 
to  Beersheba.'  111. 

8.  The  reason  '  Dan '  =  the  first  boundary,  and  also 

the  last  one,  is  that  the  affirmative  of  truth  and  good  is 
the  first  of  all  things  when  faith  and  charity  begin  with 
a  man,  but  the  last  when  the  man  is  in  charity  and 
thence  in  faith.  Hence,  too,  it  was,  that  when  the 
Land  of  Canaan  was  being  allotted  as  an  inheritance, 
the  last  lot  fell  to  Dan  (Josh.xix.40). 

9.  As  no  lot  fell  to  Dan  among  the  inheritances 

of  the  rest  of  the  tribes,  but  as  it  fell  beyond  their 
boundaries  (Judg.xviii.  1),  this  tribe  was  passed  over  in 
Rev.vii.5-8  .  .  .  for  they  who  are  in  only  the  affirmative 


Dan 


Dance 


of  truth  and  also  of  good,  and  do  not  go  further,  are  not 
in  the  Lord's  Kingdom,  that  is,  among  those  who  are 
sealed  .  .  . 

10.    'Dan'  is  also  mentioned  as  a  boundary  in  Gen. 

xiv.  14  .  .  .  and  'Dan,'  there,  has  a  similar  signification. 
The  city  called  'Dan'  was  indeed  not  then  built  by  the 
descendants  of  Dan  (Josh.xix.47  ;  Judg.xviii.29),  hut, 
relatively  to  entrance  into  Canaan,  the  first  boundary, 
or,  relatively  to  exit  from  it,  the  last  one,  was  so  called, 
even  at  that  time. 

41 1 7.  When  the  Land  of  Canaan  was  presented  in  one 
complex,  it  was  said,  'From  Gilead  even  to  Dan,'  and, 
in  another  sense,  'From  Beersheba  even  to  Dan;'  for 
Dan,  too,  was  a  boundary.   111. 

4608.  'The  sons  of  Bilhah  .  .  .  Dan  and  Naphtali' 
(Gen.  xxxv. 25)  =  the  things  which  follow  and  are  of  ser- 
vice to  interior  things.  .  .  In  the  highest  sense,  'Dan'= 
righteousness  and  mercy  ;  in  the  internal  sense,  what  is 
holy  of  faith  ;  and  in  the  external  sense,  the  good  of  life. 
60246.  'The  sons  of  Dan;  Hushim'  (Gen.xlvi.23)  = 
what  is  holy  of  faith,  and  the  good  of  life,  and  what  is 
doctrinal  belonging  thereto. 

6396.  'Dan'  (Gen. xlix)  =  those  who  are  in  truth  and 
not  yet  in  good.  For  'Dan'=the  good  of  life  ;  but  here, 
those  who  are  in  some  good  of  life  from  truth,  but  not 
yet  from  good.  Ex.  'Dan'=those  who  are  in  the  good 
of  life  from  truth,  but  not  yet  from  good  :  the  good  with 
them  as  yet  lies  hidden  in  truth,  being  as  yet  deeply 
stored  up  ;  and  it  gives  them  the  affection  of  truth,  and 
actuates  them  to  live  according  to  truth.  They  who  are 
such  are  in  the  Lord's  Kingdom  .  .  .  but  as  they  do  not 
act  from  love,  but  only  from  obedience  .  .  .  they  are 
among  those  in  the  Lord's  Kingdom  who  are  in  the  First 
Heaven.  These  are  they  who  are  represented  by  'Dan,' 
for  in  this  prophetic  utterance  of  Israel  ...  by  his 
twelve  sons  are  described  in  general  ...  all  who  are  in 
the  Lord's  Kingdom.  That  those  who  are  signified  by 
'Dan'  are  in  the  ultimate  Heaven  .  .  .  because  they  are 
in  truth  and  not  yet  in  good,  was  represented  by  the  lot 
falling  to  Dan  last  .  .  .  and  by  their  having  obtained  an 
inheritance  at  the  extremity  of  that  Land  .  .  .  wherefore 
'Dan'  represented  those  who  are  at  the  boundaries  of 
the  Lord's  Kingdom  ;  for  before  truth  is  conjoined  with 
good,  it  is  in  the  ultimate.  If,  however,  truth  is  en- 
tirely separated  from  good,  it  is  then  not  at  any  boundary 
of  the  Lord's  Kingdom,  but  is  outside  of  it.  That  the 
inheritance  of  Dan  was  the  last  or  ultimate  of  the  Land 
of  Canaan,  is  evident  from  the  fact,  that  when  the  whole 
extent  of  that  Land  is  described,  it  is  said,  'From 
Beersheba  even  to  Dan. ' 

4.  The  quality  of  those  who  are  in  truth,  and  not 

yet  in  good,  was  also  represented  by  the  Danites  who 
explored  the  land  where  they  were  dwelling  (Judg. 
xviii) ;  that  they  carried  off  a  Levite  from  Micha's 
house,  and  took  away  an  ephod,  teraphim,  and  a  graven 
image  ;  by  which  is  signified  the  worship  of  those  who 
are  in  truth  and  not  yet  in  good,  for  they  adore  external 
tilings,  and  do  not  care  for  internal  ones. 

6398.  '  Dan  shall  be  a  serpent  upon  the  way '  =  their 
ratiocination  about  truth,  because  good  does  not  yet 
lead.  ' Dan '  —  those  who  are  in  truth  and  not  yet  in 
good. 


6399°.  With  those  who  are  represented  by  'Dan,' 
truth  is  below  and  good  is  above. 

6401.  As  '  Dan '  =  those  within  the  Church  such  as 
above  described,  and  who  are  therefore  among  the  last 
in  the  Lord's  Kingdom,  by  'Dan'  are  also  signified  those 
who  hatch  falsities  from  fallacies  and  scatter  them 
about.  The  falsities  of  these  persons  are  also  called 
'horses  ;'  and  their  ratiocinations  about  truth  and  good, 
'serpents,'  in  Jer.viii.  16, 17. 

10258.  'Dan  and  Javan'  (Ezek.xxvii.  19)  =  those  who 
are  in  the  Knowledges  of  celestial  things. 

10335.  'The  tribe  of  Dan'  (Ex.xxxi.6)=those  who 
are  in  the  good  and  truth  of  faith. 

2.  The  tribe  of  Dan  was  the  last  of  the  tribes. 

Refs.  .  .  In  the  ultimate  Heaven  are  they  who  are  in  the 
truth  of  faith  from  good.  Ex. 

R.  362.  'Dan'  is  not  mentioned  in  the  enumeration 
of  the  tribes  (Rev.vii),  nor  Ephraim  ;  the  reason  being 
that  Dan  was  the  last  of  the  tribes  ;  and  his  tribe  dwelt 
the  furthest  off  in  the  Land  of  Canaan,  and  therefore 
could  not  signify  anything  in  the  Lord's  New  Heaven 
and  New  Church,  in  which  all  will  be  exclusively  celestial 
and  spiritual.  Therefore,  instead  of  Dan,  there  is 
'Manasseh.'     E.450. 

45 54.  As  Dan  was  the  last  of  the  tribes,  and  con- 
sequently =  the  last  or  ultimate  of  the  Church,  which  is 
what  is  sensuous  subjected  to  interior  things,  it  is  said 
of  him,  'Dan  shall  be  a  serpent  upon  the  way  biting  the 
horse's  heels,  and  his  rider  shall  fall  backward'  .  .  . 

E.  3558-  In  the  prophetic  utterance  of  Israel  concern- 
ing the  tribe  of  Dan,  are  signified  the  ultimates  of  the 
Church  ;  consequently,  those  who  are  in  the  ultimates 
of  truth  and  good,  who  arc  called  sensuous  .  .  .  These  do 
not  raise  their  thought  above  the  sense  of  the  letter,  and 
these  are  meant  by  'Dan' .  .  .     58111. 

31.    '  Dan '  =  truth  in  its  ultimate  :  this  truth  in  the 

Church  is  what  is  contained  in  the  sense  of  the  letter  : 
they  who  remain  in  this  only  .  .  .  may  be  carried  away 
into  errors  of  every  kind  ;  and  those  who  are  carried 
away  into  errors  or  falsities,  are  here  meant  by  'Dan' 
(Jer.viii.  16). 

39 129.  See  Bethel  at  this  ref. 

41711.  See  Beersheba  at  this  ref. 

51419.  As  the  tribe  of  Dan  was  not  present  with 
Deborah  and  Barak  in  the  battle  against  their  enemies, 
it  is  said,  'Dan,  why  should  he  fear  the  ships'  (Judg. 
v.  17),  by  which  is  signified,  why  did  he  not  repel 
falsities  and  the  doctrinal  things  of  what  is  false  ? 

Dance.      Chorea. 

A.  308 14.  The  affection  of  truth  from  good  is  described 
by  'timbrels'  and  'dances'  (Jer.xxxi.4,13).     E.86312. 

4779s.  'Dancing'  (Ps.xxx.n)  is  predicated  of  truths  ; 
and  'joy,'  of  goods. 

83375.  'To  praise  with  the  timbrel  and  the  dance' 
(Ps.cl.4)=from  the  good  and  truth  of  faith. 

8339.  'In  timbrels  and  dances' (Ex. xv. 20)= celebra- 
tion from  joy  and  gladness  .  .  .  'Dance'  is  predicated  of 
the  affection  of  spiritual  truth,  and = the  pleasantness  or 
gladness  thereof.     In  ancient  times,  gladness  of  heart 


Dance 


Dance 


was  testified  not  only  by  means  of  musical  instruments 
and  singing,  but  also  by  dances  ;  for  the  joys  of  the 
heart,  or  the  interior  things  in  the  body,  broke  forth 
into  various  acts,  as  into  singing  and  dances.  As,  in 
ancient  times,  the  gladnesses  which  surpassed  all  others 
were  spiritual  ones,  that  is,  were  from  the  affections  of 
spiritual  loves  ...  it  was  then  allowable  to  join  dances 
to  their  songs  and  musical  harmonies  ;  and  so  to  testify 
their  joy.  Hence  it  is  that  'dances' are  mentioned  in 
the  Word,  and  by  them  are  signified  the  gladnesses  of 
the  affections  of  truth  or  of  faith,  from  good  or  charity. 
111. 

[A.]  104162.  As,  in  the  Word,  internal  things  are  de- 
scribed by  means  of  external  ones,  so  also  are  the  joys  and 
gladnesses  which  are  in  the  interiors  of  man,  by  sports 
and  dances.   111. 

3.  As  sports  and  dances = the  joys  and  glad- 
nesses of  the  interiors  which  are  from  love  .  .  .  Miriam 
went  forth  with  timbrels  into  dances  .  .  .  and  David 
dsmced-saltabat-befove  Jehovah  (2  Sam.  vi.  14). 

10459.  'He  saw  the  calf  and  the  dances'  (Ex.xxxii.  19) 
=  the  infernal  worship  which  was  according  to  the  de- 
light of  the  external  loves  of  that  nation,  and  its  conse- 
quent interior  festivity  .  .  .  '  Dances '=  interior  festivity. 
M.  62.  There  then  followed  dances  of  maidens  and 
youths. 

256.  Dances  .  .  .  which  in  themselves  are  charming, 
because  they  are  vivifieations. 
T.  61 12.  See  Concupiscence  at  this  ref. 


D.  4739.  There  was  a  crowd  outside  the  temple  leap- 
ing, and  carrying  on  dances  which  were  not  holy. 

E.  32311.  Musical  instruments  and  dances  =  the  joys 
and  gladnesses  which  result  from  the  affections. 

Dance.      Sctltare,  Saltatio. 

Dancer.     Saltator. 

A.  4658s.  Like  a  dancer  who  wants  to  learn  to 
dance  from  a  knowledge  of  the  motor  fibres  and  muscles. 
D.3950. 

104163.  See  DxscK-chorea,  at  this  ref. 
J.  56s.  In  some  of  these  Societies  (of  the  mock  Heaven 
of  the  Papists)  they  dance  .  .  .     D.5213.  6012. 

M.  5ooe.  The  adulterers  went  down  into  Hell  as  it 
were  dancing. 


52I3- 


D.  3100.  A  place  where  there  are  dances,  etc. 
6012. 

3212.  They  do  nothing  there  but  dance,  etc. 

E.  40513.  Therefore  the  joy  originating  from  the  good 
of  love  is  described  and  meant  by  '  dancing  and 
skipping. ' 

14.   'The  mountains  danced  like  rams'  (Ps.cxiv.3) 

...  'To  dance'  (being  predicated  of  the  good  of  love)  = 
to  do  goods  from  joy. 

54313.  Locusts  have  legs  above  their  feet  'to  leap  upon 
the  earth'  (Lev.xi.21).  .  .  It  is  said  to  'leap  upon  the 
earth,'  because  when  'leaping'  is  predicated  of  flying 
creatures,  it  =  to  live,  as  'walking'  does  when  predicated 
of  animals  of  the  earth  ;  and  spiritual  life  is  from  the 


truths   which  are   from   good,    which   are   signified  by 
'leaping  with  feet  above  which  are  legs.' 

70028.  David's  dancing  represented  the  gladness  and 
joy  which  result  from  the  affection  of  truth  and  good  from 
the  Lord  through  the  influx  of  Divine  truth,  which  was 
signified  by  the  ark. 

102914.  'To  dance'  (Is.xiii.2i)=joy  from  the  filthy 
love  which  has  adulterated  the  good  of  love. 

C.  189.  There  are  diversions  of  charity  .  .  .  Dances 
at  weddings,  and  at  festive  gatherings. 

Dance.      Saltitare. 

E.  35523.  'To  neigh'  and  'to  dance'  (Nah.iii.2)  =  to 
be  carried  away  by  desire  and  delight. 

Dane.     See  Denmark. 

Danger.     Periculum. 
Dangerous.    Periadosus. 

A.  3757e.  How  great  is  the  danger  from  profana- 
tion .  .  . 

403 1 e.  Unless  it  is  received  in  freedom  it  is  dangerous. 
53872.  Such  are  most  timid  at  the  slightest  danger, 
and  most  courageous  when  there  is  no  danger. 

5863e.  How  dangerous  it  is  for  a  man  to  be  in  living 
consort  with  Spirits,  unless  he  is  in  the  good  of  faith. 

90509.  '  With  the  peril  of  our  souls  Ave  have  brought 
our  bread'  (Lam.v.9).  'The  peril  of  souls' =  the  peril 
of  the  loss  of  faith,  and  therefore  of  spiritual  life. 

H.  249.  To  speak  with  Spirits  is  now  rarely  granted, 
because  it  is  dangerous.  Ex.  292s.  U.9  (e.)  E.  11824. 
5,Ex. 

4563.  It  is  dangerous  to  confirm  anything  by  visions 
with  those  who  are  in  falsities.  Ex.  .  .  This  is  the 
danger  which  is  meant  in  John  xii.40. 

P.  140.  No  one  is  reformed  in  a  state  of  misfortune. 
.  .  .  By  states  of  misfortune  are  meant  states  of  despair 
caused  by  danger  ;  as  in  battles,  shipwrecks,  etc.  Ex. 

R.  473.  These  things  are  not  received,  until  after 
those  who  are  meant  by  'the  dragon'  .  .  .  have  been  cast 
out  of  the  World  of  Spirits  ;  because  there  would  be 
danger  if  they  were  received  before. 

878.  The  internal  of  the  Heaven  from  Christians  was 
not  fully  formed  .  .  .  earlier  than  some  time  before  the 
Last  Judgment,  and  likewise  after  it  .  .  .  There  was 
danger  in  collecting  them  into  any  Heaven  before.  Ex. 

D.  150.  The  descendants  of  Jacob  .  .  .  succumb  in 
every  danger  .  .  .  But  the  moment  the  state  of  danger 
is  changed,  they  return  into  their  nature  .  .  . 

3060J.  The  learned  are  not  permitted  to  speak  with 
Spirits,  except  at  the  peril  of  their  lives  ...  It  is  most 
dangerous  for  any  learned  person,  who  has  been  imbued 
with  phantasies,  to  be  able  to  speak  with  Spirits,  or  to 
be  presented  with  any  revelation. 

3061.  For  those  who  are  not  in  the  love  of  faith,  it  is 
as  dangerous  to  come  into  the  angelic  Heaven  as  it  is  to 
go  into  flame.  Ex. 

4378.  Hence  it  may  be  known  how  dangerous  it  is  to 


Danger 


Darkness 


instruct  others  in  evils,  or  to  place  stumbling-blocks  in 
anyone's  way. 

4748.  See  Chaiiles  XII.  at  this  ref. 


E.  7309.  'With  peril  of  souls  to  bring  bread '  =  the 
difficulty  and  da,ngev-discrimen-of  procuring  the  truths 
of  life  from  the  Word. 

Danger,  To  be  in.    Periditari. 

A.  I033e.  They  perceive  their    life,    etc.    to  be  in 
danger. 
M.  155.  (With  such)  eternal  life  is  not  endangered. 

D.  4580.  When  their  reputation  is  not  endangered. 

Daniel.     Daniel. 

A.  1709.  This  is  historically  true,  but  still  was  repre- 
sentative ;  as  is  everything  historical  of  the  Word  in  the 
book  .  .  .  of  Daniel,etc. 

36522.  'Spoken  of  by  Daniel  the  prophet'  (Matt.xxiv. 
1 5)  =  by  the  prophets ;  for  when  any  prophet  is  mentioned 
in  the  Word  by  name,  it  is  not  the  prophet  who  is  meant, 
but  the  prophetic  Word  itself  ...  By  'Daniel,'  however, 
is  signified  everything  prophetical  concerning  the  Lord's 
Advent,  and  the  state  of  the  Church  ;  here,  concerning 
its  last  state. 

52234.  See  Magician  at  this  ref. 


E.  72428.  Those  who  are  being  reformed  by  means  of 
truths  from  the  Word  and  by  means  of  temptations  are 
signified  by  'Noah,  Daniel,  and  Job'  (Ezek.xv.  14). 

Daphne.     Daphne.    T.s8e. 

Dare.     Audere. 
A.   7  54 13.  Until  they  dare  not  do  evil  to  anyone. 

Dark.     See  Obscure. 

Darken.      Obfuscare. 
Darkening.     Obfuscatio. 

A.  1639.  (The  corporeal  memory)  darkens  the  interior 
one. 

2056.  The  darkening  and  contamination  of  a  thing. 
Sig. 

219613.  Man's  Rational  .  .  .  thus  darkened  .  .  . 

T.  404.  Resplendent  before  the  eyes  of  men,  but 
dark-jfttsCT-before  those  of  Angels. 


D.  2263e.  There  thus  results  nothing  but  a  darkening 
of  the  true  light. 

2264.  Thus  the  light  is  darkened,  as  by  a  rain 
cloud  .  .  . 

5749.  Heaven  begins  to  be  darkened  in  them  .  .  . 

Darkened.    See  Black-^/^. 
Darkness.     Caligatio. 

H.  572e.  Thick  darkness-ca%o-then  ensues  there, 
and  consequent  infatuation  and  darkness. 

Darkness.     Caligo. 
Dark,  To  be.     Caligare. 

Dark.     Caliginosus. 

A.  7.  The   first  state  is  that  which   precedes,   both 


from  infancy,  and  immediately  before  regeneration,  and 
is  called ' emptiness, ' '  voidness,'and  'darkness'  (Gen.i.2). 

17.  Hence  comes  'darkness,'  or  stupidity  and  ig- 
norance about  all  things  which  belong  to  faith  in  the 
Lord,  thus  to  spiritual  and  celestial  life. 

2ie.  All  things  proper  to  man  are  compared  to  'night,' 
because  they  are  of  darkness. 

232.  Men  are  now  able  to  confirm  the  unbelief  of  the 
senses  by  scientifics  unknown  to  the  ancients  ;  in  con- 
sequence of  which  the  darkness  is  so  great  that  it  cannot 
be  described  :  if  man  were  aware  how  great  is  the  dark- 
ness thence  resulting,  he  would  be  astounded. 

1 1 58s.  Their  ignorance  is  here  representatively  ex- 
pressed by  'a  cloud  and  darkness'  (Ps.xcvii.2) ;  but  as 
they  are  in  simplicity  and  uprightness,  it  is  said,  'round 
about  Him.' 

1 32 1.  When  the  worship  of  self  takes  the  place  of 
the  worship  of  the  Lord,  all  truth  is  not  only  perverted, 
but  is  abolished  ;  and  at  last  falsity  is  acknowledged 
instead  of  truth,  and  evil  instead  of  good  ;  for  all  the 
light  of  truth  is  from  the  Lord,  and  all  darkness  is  from 
man.  When,  in  worship,  man  takes  the  Lord's  place, 
the  light  of  truth  becomes  darkness  ;  and  then  they 
regard  light  as  darkness,  and  darkness  as  light.  Such, 
also,  is  their  life  after  death  ;  the  life  of  falsity  is  to 
them  as  light,  but  the  life  of  truth  as  darkness.  The 
light  of  such  life  is  however  turned  into  mere  darkness 
when  they  approach  Heaven. 

1839.  See  DAKKNEsa-tenebrae,  at  these  refs.     5. 

7688.  E.52611. 

i860.  'Thick  darkness  took  place'  (Gen.xv.  17)  = 
when  there  is  hatred  in  place  of  charity.  'Darkness- 
tenebrae'  —  falsities,  but  'thick  darkness,'  evils.  There 
is  '  darkness-tewe&rae '  when  there  is  falsity  in  place  of 
truth,  and  'thick  darkness'  when  there  is  evil  in  place 
of  good,  or,  what  is  just  the  same,  when  there  is  hatred 
in  place  of  charity.  AVhen  there  is  hatred  in  place  of 
charity,  the  darkness  is  so  great,  that  the  man  is  utterly 
unaware  that  it  is  evil,  still  less  is  he  aware  that  it  is 
evil  so  great  that,  in  the  other  life,  it  thrusts  him  down 
to  Hell.  Ex. 

3.  That  '  d&vkness-teuebrae' =  falsity,  and  'thick 

darkness'  evil.  111. 

e.  The  word,  however,  in  the  Original  Language, 

by  which  : thick  darkness'  is  expressed  in  this  verse, 
involves  both  falsity  and  evil ;  or  the  dense  falsity  from 
which  is  evil,  and  the  dense  evil  from  which  is  falsity. 

216215.  The  same  (natural  and  corporeal  things)  are 
signified  by  .  .  .  'thick  darkness  was  under  His  feet' 
(Ps.xviii.9). 

24053.  The  Lord's  Advent  is  called  '  a  day  of  darkness 
and  of  thick  darkness'  (Joel  ii.  1),  because  the  good  are 
then  separated  from  the  evil. 

24414.  (To  such)  the  light  of  Heaven  appears  as  thick 
darkness.  Sig. 

27614.  'Thick  darkness'  (Ps.xviii.9),  here,  =  the 
clouds. 

30333.  In  the  other  life  ...  in  proportion  as  (such) 
are  in  the  persuasion  that  they  are  in  the  truth  do  they 
induce  darkness  on  others. 


Darkness 


Darkness 


[A.]  3224s.  On  the  approach  of  the  light  of  Heaven, 
this  light  is  at  once  extinguished,  and  becomes  thick 
darkness.    4416    5219. 

3340.  To  that  light  is  opposed  thick  darkness  .  .  . 
The  infernals  have  this  thick  darkness  from  the  falsities 
in  which  they  are  .  .  .  and  the  further  they  are  from 
truths,  the  greater  is  their  darkness.  When  it  is 
granted  to  look  into  the  Hells  where  such  are,  there 
appears  a  pitch  dark  mist,  in  which  they  pass  their 
time.  .  .  Sometimes  light  is  given  them,  but  it  is  a 
deceptive  lumen,  and  is  extinguished  for  them,  and 
becomes  darkness  as  soon  as  they  look  at  the  light  of 
truth  ...  A  certain  person  was  let  into  that  pitch  dark 
mist  in  which  the  infernals  are,  in  order  that  he  might 
know  how  the  case  is  with  them.  Des. 

3342e.  On  account  of  the  obscurity,  nay,  thick  dark- 
ness-caligiiiosum,  which  earthly,  corporeal,  and  worldly 
things  induce.     3413. 

3413.  They  who  are  in  doctrine  alone,  and  not  in  life, 
are  utterly  darkened-ca^V/a?^Mr-and  stupefied  .  .  . 

3425"*.  To  the  infernals  the  Lord  appears  ...  as  thick 
darkness  like  that  of  night. 

3493.  '(Isaac's)  eyes  were  dark  so  that  he  could  not 
see'  (Gen.xxvii.  i)  =  when  the  Rational  wanted  to  en- 
lighten the  Natural  with  what  was  Divine  .  .  .  When 
the  eyes  are  said  'to  be  dark,'  it = that  there  is  no 
longer  any  apperception  ;  here,  no  apperception  of  those 
things  which  were  in  the  Natural  ;  and  as  this  is  the 
signification  of  these  words,  it  -  that  the  Rational  wanted 
to  enlighten  the  Natural  with  what  was  Divine.  Ex. 

3643.  In  proportion  as  the  infernals  are  in  hatred  and 
thence  in  falsity,  they  are  in  thick  darkness  and  in  cold. 

3888.  They  who  are  solely  in  corporeal  ideas  .  .  .  can 
only  think  about  spiritual  and  celestial  things  in  a 
sensuous  and  corporeal  way  ;  consequently,  from  mere 
thick  darkness  about  the  things  of  heavenly  light  .  .  . 
This  thick  darkness  ...  so  completely  extinguishes 
celestial  and  spiritual  things,  that  they  appear  to  such 
persons  as  nothing. 

40753.  Unless,  by  means  of  some  idea,  they  made  that 
infinite  finite  ...  it  would  be  like  looking  into  thick 
darkness. 

475 12.  See  Avarice  at  this  ref. 

3.  Unless,  by  means  of  avarice,  (the  Jews)  had 

been  so  far  removed  from  internal  things,  and  thus  kept 
in  dense  thick  darkness,  they  would  have  defiled  interior 
truths  and  goods  .  .  . 

6832s.  As  the  Lord  appears  to  everyone  according  to 
his  quality,  He  cannot  appear  to  those  who  are  in  Hell 
otherwise  than  as  a  dusky  cloud  and  thick  darkness ; 
for  as  soon  as  the  light  of  Heaven  .  .  .  falls  into  any 
Hell,  darkness-Zewefrrae-and  thick  darkness  reign  there. 

6948°.  Hence  it  is,  that  when  a  man  is  in  what  is 
sensuous  and  its  light,  he  is  in  thick  darkness  as  to  the 
things  of  the  Spiritual  World,  that  is,  as  to  those  things 
which  are  in  light  from  the  Divine ;  and  hence  it  is, 
that  sensuous  lumen  is  turned  into  mere  thick  darkness 
when  light  from  Heaven  falls  upon  it :  the  reason  is,  that 
the  truths  which  are  of  Divine  light  cannot  be  together 
with  fallacies  and  the  falsities  thence  derived,  but  ex- 
tinenrish  them,  and  so  induce  thick  darkness. 


71021".  'The  pestilence  which  creepeth  in  thick  dark- 
ness' (Ps.xci.6)  =  the  evil  which  is  in  concealment. 

7 17 1.  To  Spirits,  the  light  of  the  sun  of  the  world  is 
like  dense  darkness.  .  .  That  sun  ...  is  presented  in 
their  ideas  as  a  certain  thick  darkness-cciKj/mo.s?*??;- 
at  a  great  distance  behind  them,  and  a  little  above  the 
plane  of  the  head. 

771 1.  'There  shall  be  thick  darkness  over  the  land 
of  Egypt'  (Ex.x.2i)  =  the  complete  privation  of  truth  and 
good.  'Thick  darkness'  =  the  complete  privation  of  truth 
and  good.  'Darkness,'  and,  at  the  same  time,  'thick 
darkness,'  are  mentioned  in  the  Word  ;  and,  in  such 
cases,  'darkness'  is  predicated  of  falsity,  and  'thick 
darkness'  of  evil  together  with  it.  But  the  word  by 
which  'thick  darkness'  is  expressed  in  this  verse  means 
the  densest  darkness -tenebra.s- of  all,  by  which  are 
signified  such  falsities  as  stream  forth  from  evil  :  such 
falsities  come  forth  with  those  who  have  belonged  to 
the  Church,  and  have  lived  a  life  of  evil  contrary  to  the 
precepts  of  faith  which  they  knew  :  the  evil  from  which 
these  falsities  spring  forth  is  contrary  to  the  Church,  to 
Heaven,  and  to  the  Lord  ;  thus  is  diametrically  contrary 
to  good  and  truth  :  this  state  is  here  described  by  '  thick 
darkness.'     7714.  E.52614. 

2.  That  both  'darkness'  and  'thick  darkness'  are 

mentioned  together  in  the  Word,  and  that  in  such  cases 
' darkness '  =  the  privation  of  truth;  and  'thick  dark- 
ness, '  the  privation  of  both  truth  and  good.  111. 

e.    'Darkness,'  also,  =  ignorance  of  truth,  such  as 

there  is  with  the  gentiles  ;  and  '  thick  darkness, '  ig- 
norance of  good.  111. 

7712.  'And  one  will  feel  about  in  the  thick  darkness' 
(id.)  =  the  density  of  falsity  from  evil.  'To  feel  about 
in  thick  darkness  '  =  that  the  falsity  from  evil  is  so  dense 
that  nothing  of  truth  and  good  can  be  known  ;  but  if  it 
is  sought  after,  it  is  like  one  feeling  about  in  thick 
darkness,  and  stumbling  over  and  knocking  against 
everything ;  wherefore,  in  Isaiah,  thick  darkness  is 
called  'the  thick  darkness  of  striking  against'  (viii.22)  ; 
and  it  is  thus  described  in  the  same  :  'We  walk  in  thick 
darkness,  we  feel  for  the  wall  like  the  blind,  and  as  no 
eyes  do  we  feel  about ;  we  stumble  in  noon-day  as  in 
twilight ;  among  the  living  we  are  as  the  dead '  (lix.9, 10). 
7870.  Hence  it  is  evident  that  the  state  of  those  who 
are  in  Hell  is  called  'night ;'  not  that  the  thick  dark- 
ness of  night  prevails  there,  for  they  see  one  another  ; 
but  as  the  state  of  truth  and  good  in  the  Heavens  is 
called  'day,'  a  state  of  falsity  and  evil  is  consequently 
called  'night:'  there  also  is  thick  darkness  there  when 
any  light  of  Heaven  flows  in  there  ;  for  then  the  light 
by  which  they  see  is  dissipated,  and  becomes  thick 
darkness.  Refs. 

7950.  See  Captive  at  this  ref. 

81972.  Heavenly  light .  .  .  becomes  thick  darkness 
with  the  evil,  even  if  they  are  in  the  light  itself ;  and 
the  thick  darkness  becomes  the  greater  in  proportion  to 
the  density  of  the  falsity  of  evil  with  them  :  the  reason 
is  that  the  Divine  truth  proceeding  from  the  Lord 
appears  before  the  eyes  of  the  Angels  as  light ;  but  to 
those  who  are  in  falsities  from  evil  it  cannot  appear  as 
light,  but  as  thick  darkness  ;  for  falsity  is  opposite  to 
truth,  and  extinguishes  it.  Sig. 


Darkness 


Darkness 


821 1.  'It  came  to  pass  in  the  morning  watch '= the 
state  of  thick  darkness  and  destruction  of  those  who  are 
in  falsity  from  evil,  and  the  state  of  enlightenment  and 
salvation  of  those  who  are  in  truth  from  good.  .  .  In  the 
state  to  which  'morning'  corresponds,  the  good  begin  to 
be  enlightened  as  to  the  things  of  faith  .  .  .  but  the  evil 
then  begin  to  be  overshadowed  by  falsities  .  .  .  Con- 
sequently, to  these,  'morning'  is  a  state  of  thick  dark- 
ness and  destruction :  to  the  former,  it  is  one  of 
enlightenment  and  salvation. 

2.  From  these  states  in  Heaven  there  come  forth 

states  of  light  and  heat,  and  also  states  of  darkness 
and  cold  on  earth  .  .  . 

87803.  At  the  presence  of  heavenly  light  (sensuous 
light)  becomes  mere  darkness. 

e.  As  these  things  belong  to  their  doctrine,  they 

see  nothing  about  the  Lord  ;  this  is  to  them  like  thick 
darkness. 

8928.  'Moses  drew  nigh  to  the  thick  darkness  where 
God  was'  (Ex.xx.2i)  =  the  conjunction  still  of  the  truth 
of  spiritual  good  with  truth  Divine  .  .  .  The  reason 
truth  Divine  is  'thick  darkness'  to  (the  Spiritual 
Church),  is  that  they  are  not  in  any  light  as  to  Divine 
truths  .  .  .  They  who  belong  to  the  Spiritual  Church 
.  .  .  believe  that  they  are  in  the  light ;  but  that  they 
are  in  obscurity,  nay,  in  thick  darkness  as  to  truth 
Divine,  is  evident  from  the  fact,  that  they  do  not  know 
from  any  internal  perception  that  what  the  Church  says 
is  true,  but  merely  from  the  fact  of  the  Church's  saying 
so.  This  they  confirm,  whether  it  be  true  or  false  ;  and 
he  who  is  not  in  internal  perception  about  truth  Divine 
is  in  thick  darkness ;  or,  what  is  the  same,  to  him, 
Divine  truth  is  thick  darkness.  Examp.  .  .  Hence  it  is 
evident,  in  what  obscurity,  or  in  what  thick  darkness 
is  the  Spiritual  Church. 

4.  The  other  reason  why  Moses  is  said  to  have 

entered  into  the  thick  darkness  where  God  was,  when  he 
drew  nigh  to  God,  is  that  Moses  as  the  leader  repre- 
sented the  Israelitish  and  Jewish  people,  which  was  in 
such  thick  darkness  as  to  internal  truths  as  to  be  utterly 
ignorant  of  them  ;  for  they  made  the  whole  of  worship 
and  everything  Divine  to  consist  in  external  things  ; 
hence  the  Divine  was  to  them  thick  darkness.  For  it 
is  known  to  everybody  that  the  Divine  is  never  in 
thick  darkness,  but  in  light  .  .  .  But  the  Divine  appears 
to  everyone  according  to  the  quality  of  his  life  and 
faith  ;  thus  as  light  to  those  who  are  in  light,  and  as 
thick  darkness  to  those  who  are  in  thick  darkness.  .  . 
That  the  Lord  appeared  upon  Sinai  to  (that  people)  in 
smoke,  cloud,  and  thick  darkness,  according  to  their 
quality.   Refs. 

9256s.  Hence  it  is,  that  all  things  of  faith  and  charity, 
that  is,  of  the  doctrine  of  the  Church,  or  of  the  "Word  ; 
in  general,  all  heavenly  and  Divine  things ;  are  to 
them  thick  darkness  ;  and  worldly  and  earthly  things 
are  light. 

95772.  The  things  which  are  in  the  light  of  Heaven 
are  in  thick  darkness  in  proportion  as  man  sees  from 
the  light  of  the  world ;  and,  conversely,  the  things 
which  are  in  the  light  of  the  world  are  in  thick  dark- 
ness when  ma.n  sees  from  the  light  of  Heaven  .  .  .  Hence 
it  may  be  known  whence  it  is  that  at  this  day  man  is  in 


thick  darkness  about  heavenly  things  .  .  .  for,  at  this 
day,  man  is  so  immersed  in  the  body,  thus  in  corporeal, 
earthly,  and  worldly  things,  and  is  in  such  a  gross  light 
of  the  world,  that,  to  him,  heavenly  things  are  utter 
darkness,  and  therefore  the  sight  of  his  spirit  cannot 
be  enlightened. 

96424.  'Darkness'  and  'thick  darkness'  (Is.lviii.io) 
=  ignorance  of  truth  and  of  good. 

9801.  See  Cold  at  these  refs.     9802. 

1 006 14.  'The  right  eye'  =  the  knowledge  of  good 
applied  to  confirm  what  is  false  ;  of  which  knowledge, 
because  it  is  good  for  nothing,  it  is  said  that  'in  darken- 
ing it  shall  be  d&Tk-caligando  caligabit'  (Zech.xi.  17) .  .  . 
'Thick  darkness '  =  falsity  from  evil. 

101562.  They  who  are  solely  in  natural  knowledge  .  .  . 
if,  by  their  own  lumen,  which  is  called  natural  lumen, 
they  want  to  enter  into  the  things  of  Heaven,  there 
meets  them  as  it  were  a  thick  darkness-caliginosum- 
which  blinds  them,  and  causes  what  is  heavenly  to  be 
as  nothing  ;  for  that  which  in  the  mind  appears  as 
thick  darkness  is  of  this  nature. 

102014.  They  are  not  in  enlightenment  from  the 
Lord,  but  from  self  and  the  world,  which  enlightenmen 
is  mere  thick  darkness  in  spiritual  things  .  .  . 

102272.  The  ascription  of  all  things  to  the  Lord  opens 
the  interiors  of  man  towards  Heaven,  for  he  thus  ac- 
knowledges that  there  is  no  truth  and  good  from  himself, 
and  in  proportion  as  he  acknowledges  this,  self-love 
departs,  and,  with  self-love,  the  thick  darkness  from 
falsities  and  evils  .  .  . 

:!.  Natural  lumen,  when  separated  from  the  light 

of  Heaven,  as  to  the  truths  and  goods  of  Heaven,  is 
mere  thick  darkness.     1055 13. 

10420.  Hence  it  is,  that  all  things  of  Heaven  and 
the  Church  are  thick  darkness  to  them. 

105745.  'The  darkness,  and  thick  darkness  which 
cover  the  earth  and  the  peoples'  (Is.lx. 2)  =  obscure 
things  of  faith  and  of  love  ;  for  this  is  said  concerning 
the  establishment  of  the  Church  among  the  gentiles. 

106942.  When  heavenly  light  flows  into  the  light  of 
the  world,  it  induces  thick  darkness,  and  consequent 
stupidity. 

H.  122.  The  sun  of  the  world  appears  to  the  Angels 
as  a  certain  thick  darkness-cafe/raoswra-opposite  to  the 
Sun  of  Heaven  ;  and  the  moon,  as  a  certain  darkness- 
tenebrosum-o'p'posite  to  the  Moon  of  Heaven,  and  this 
constantly.  The  reason  is,  that  the  fire  of  the  world 
corresponds  to  self-love  ;  and  the  light  thence  to  the 
falsity  from  that  love  ;  and  self-love  is  quite  opposite  to 
Divine  love  ;  and  the  falsity  from  that  love  is  quite 
opposite  to  Divine  truth ;  and  that  which  is  opposite 
to  Divine  love  and  Divine  truth,  to  the  Angels,  is  thick 
darkness. 

(d).  To  those  who  are  in  the  Hells,  the  Sun  of 

Heaven  is  thick  darkness. 

123.  They  who  are  in  Hell  turn  themselves  to  the 
thick  darkness  and  the  darkness  which  are  in  the 
opposite  .  .  .  They  who  turn  themselves  to  the  thick 
darkness  ...  are  called  Genii ;  and  they  who  turn 
themselves  to  the  darkness  .  .  .  are  called  Spirits : 
hence  it  is  that  those  who  are  in  the  Hells  are  said  to 


Darkness 


Darkness 


be  in  darkness-toie&ris  .  .  .  D avkness-t eneb r ae  =  falsity 
from  evil.     151.  552e.  561. 

[H.]  3532.  Hence  they  cannot  see  what  is  true  and  good, 
for,  with  them,  these  are  in  thick  darkness  ;  and  falsity 
and  evil  are  in  light. 

488.  All  they  who  are  in  evil,  and  have  confirmed 
themselves  in  falsities  against  the  truths  of  the  Church, 
especially  they  who  have  rejected  the  Word,  shun  the 
light  of  Heaven  and  hurry  into  vaults,  the  entrances  to 
which  appear  pitch  dark,  and  into  holes  in  the  rocks  ; 
and  there  hide  themselves  away  ;  and  this  because  they 
have  loved  falsities,  and  have  hated  truths  ;  for  such 
things  correspond  to  vaults  and  to  holes  in  the  rocks  .  .  . 
It  is  their  delight  to  dwell  there  .  .  .     E.4102. 

(s).    '  Darkness '  =  falsities,    and   dense   darkness- 

densae  tenebrae,  or  'thick  darkness,'  falsities  of  evil. 
Refs. 

5182.  They  with  whom  Knowledges  resided  only  in 
the  memory  ...  on  the  influx  of  the  light  of  Heaven 
their  eyes  began  to  be  d&xk-caligare. 

553e.  The  lumen  (of  the  infernals)  is  turned  into 
mere  thick  darkness  when  any  of  the  light  of  Heaven 
flows  in  thither  :  hence  it  is,  that  the  Hells  are  said  to 
be  in  thick  darkness  and  in  darkness  ;  and  that  thick 
darkness  and  darkness  =  falsities  from  evil,  such  as  there 
are  in  Hell. 

56 1 e.  Thick  darkness— what  is  evil. 

584.  To  the  reception  of  that  (infernal)  lumen  their 
eyes  are  accommodated,  because,  while  they  lived  in  the 
world  they  had  been  in  thick  darkness  as  to  Divine 
truths,  by  denying  them  ;  and  as  it  were  in  lumen  as  to 
falsities,  by  affirming  them  ;  whence  their  eye-sight  has 
been  so  formed.  Hence  also  it  is,  that  the  light  of 
Heaven  is  thick  darkness  to  them  ;  wherefore,  when 
they  come  out  of  their  caves  they  see  nothing.  From 
this  it  most  clearly  appears,  that  man  comes  into  the 
light  of  Heaven  in  proportion  as  he  acknowledges  the 
Divine  and  confirms  with  himself  the  things  of  Heaven 
and  the  Church  ;  and  that  he  comes  into  the  thick  dark- 
ness of  Hell  in  proportion  as  he  denies  the  Divine  and 
confirms  with  himself  the  things  which  are  contrary  to 
those  of  Heaven  and  the  Church. 

586.  Most  of  the  Hells  are  triplicate,  the  higher  ones 
appearing  pitch  dark  within,  because  there  they  are  in 
falsities  of  evil  ...  for  thick  darkness  corresponds  to 
the  falsities  of  evil. 

N.  37.  Hence  it  is,  that  with  the  evil,  the  things  of 
Heaven  are  in  thick  darkness,  and  those  of  the  world 
in  light. 

J.  382.  In  proportion  as  man  from  internal  becomes 
external,  spiritual  light  is  dark-ra%a£wr-with  him  .  .  . 

P.  1673.  When  an  Angel  looks  into  Hell,  he  sees 
nothing  but  mere  thick  darkness  there  ;  and  when  a 
Spirit  of  Hell  looks  into  Heaven,  he  sees  nothing  but 
thick  darkness  there  :  the  reason  is,  that  heavenly 
wisdom  is  as  thick  darkness  to  those  who  are  in  Hell ; 
and,  on  the  other  hand,  infernal  insanity  is  as  thick 
darkness  to  those  who  are  in  Heaven. 

R.  no.  'Thou  dwellest  where  Satan's  throne  is'  = 
their  life  in  thick  darkness.     '  Satan '  =  the  Hell  of  those 


who  are  in  falsities,  and  to  be  in  falsities  is  to  be  in 
spiritual  thick  darkness.  Spiritual  thick  darkness,  the 
shadow  of  death,  and  darkness-tenebrae-,  are  nothing 
but  the  states  of  those  in  Hell,  who  are  in  the  falsities 
of  evil ;  on  which  account  falsities  are  described  by  them 
in  the  Word.  .  .  But  by  '  thick  darkness, '  here,  it  is  not 
meant  that  they  are  in  mere  falsities,  but  that  they  are 
in  no  truths  of  doctrine  ;  for  the  truths  of  doctrine 
which  are  from  the  Word  are  in  light  ;  hence,  not  to  be 
in  truths  is  not  to  be  in  light,  consequently  it  is  to  be 
in  thick  darkness. 

2.   In  many  places  in  the  Word,  it  treats  of  those 

who  are  in  'darkness,'  'the  shadow  of  death,' and  'thick 
darkness,'  whose  eyes  the  Lord  will  open,  and  by  them 
are  meant  the  gentiles,  who  have  been  in  good  works, 
but  not  in  any  truths,  because  they  have  not  known  the 
Lord,  nor  possessed  the  Word  .  .  .  Hence  it  may  be 
evident,  that  by  'thou  dwellest  where  Satan's  throne  is,' 
is  signified  their  life  of  good  in  thick  darkness. 

312.  See  BhACK-niger,  at  this  ref. 

423.  'The  sun  and  the  air  were  darkened-obscuratm- 
by  the  smoke  of  the  pit'  =  that  thence  the  light  of  that 
truth  became  thick  darkness. 

566s.  They  then  looked  up,  aud  Heaven  appeared  to 
them  as  blood,  and  afterwards  as  thick  darkness. 

M.  233s.  (A  confirmer  tries  to  prove  that  light  is  dark- 
ness, and  darkness  light. ) 

5005.  It  suddenly  became  pitch  dark-ca%o. 

B.  79.  That,  according  to  the  above  prediction,  there 
is  at  this  day  such  thick  darkness  in  Christian  Churches 
.  .  .  is  due  entirely  to  the  doctrine  of  justification  by 
faith  alone  .  .  . 

I.  44.  Hence  it  is  evident  into  what  blindness,  thick 
darkness,  and  stupidity  those  may  fall  who  know 
nothing  of  the  Spiritual  World  and  its  Sun  .  .  .  into 
thick  darkness,  because  the  sight  of  the  mind,  while 
the  sight  of  the  eye  is  flowing  into  it  from  within,  is 
bereaved  of  all  spiritual  lumen,  and  becomes  like  that  of 
an  owl. 

T.  2093.  If  anyone  who  is  in  falsities  looks  at  the 
Word  as  it  lies  in  the  holy  place,  thick  darkness  spreads 
before  his  eyes,  and  consequently  the  Word  appears 
to  him  black,  and  sometimes  as  if  covered  with  soot. 


D.  5464s.  Some  (evil  Spirits)  envelop  others  with  thick 
darkness,  and  transfer  them  into  thick  darkness-ca^'- 
ginosum,  and  thus  compel  them  to  think  about  their 
own  selves. 

D.  Min.  4682.  Thick  darkness  has  insanity  in  it. 
4818.  Such  (Genii)  were  there  as  loved  thick  darkness. 

E.  23911.  '  Darkness-<ewe6rae, '  and  '  thick  darknesses ' 
( Is.  lix.  9, 10)  =  falsities. 

38613.  'Behold  straitness  and  thick  darkness'  (Is.viii. 
22)  =  that  (goods  and  truths)  are  not  anywhere  to  be 
found,  but  mere  falsities  ;  'thick  darkness '  =  dense 
falsity. 

25.   'Then  shall  thy  light  rise  in  the  darkness,  and 

thy  thick  darkness  be  as  the  noonday'  (Is.lviii.  10). 
' Darkness' =  the  ignorance  of  the  spiritual  mind;  and 
'thick  darkness,'  the  ignorance  of  the  natural  mind  .  .  . 


Darkness 


Darkness 


410-.  In  the  lowest  parts  (of  the  Spiritual  World) 
dwell  those,  who,  relatively  to  the  light  of  those  who 
are  above,  are  in  darkness  and  thick  darkness. 

.  The  thick  darkness  in  these  gates   (of  Hell) 

appears  as  thick  darkness  to  good  Spirits  and  Angels  ; 
but  as  luminosity  to  evil  Spirits.  .  .  This  luminosity, 
however,  is  not  like  that  of  the  world  in  the  daytime, 
but  is  like  the  nocturnal  luminosity  of  owls,  moles,  and 
bats,  which  see  nothing  in  daylight ;  and,  therefore,  to 
them,  daylight  is  thick  darkness,  while  the  darkness- 
tenebrae-of  night  is  their  lumen  :  their  sight  is  of  this 
character,  because  it  is  formed  by  falsities  and  evils, 
which,  in  themselves,  are  darkness  and  thick  darkness  ; 
wherefore,  by  'darkness,'  in  the  Word,  are  signified 
falsities  of  every  kind  ;  and,  by  'thick  darkness,'  the 
falsities  of  evil. 

41912.  'Thick  darkness  under  His  feet'  (Ps.xviii.9)  = 
falsities  of  evil  in  lower  things. 

52611.   'Thick  darknesses'  (Is. lix.)  =  falsities  of  evil. 

746s.  Occurs. 

75011.  'Darkness' and  'thick  darkness'  (Is.lviii.io)  = 
ignorance  of  truth  and  of  good. 

Darkness.      Tenebrae,  Obte?iebratio. 
Darken.      Obtenebrare. 
Darksomeness.      Tenebrositas. 

Dark.      Tenebrosus,  Tenebricosus. 

A.  21.  'God  distinguished  between  the  light  and  the 
darkness.  And  God  called  the  light  day,  and  the  dark- 
ness He  called  night'  (Gen. i. 4, 5).  'The  darkness'  is 
what  has  appeared  as  light  before  man  is  conceived 
and  born  anew  ;  because  evil  appeared  as  good,  and 
falsity  as  truth  ;  but  they  are  darkness,  and  are  the 
things  proper  to  man  which  remain. 

31.  'I  will  set  darkness  upon  thy  land'  (Ezek.xxxii.8) 
=  that  through  sensuous  and  scientific  things  they  have 
extinguished  love  and  faith. 

.   'The  sun  is  darkened-o6tewe&ra£ws-in  his  going 

forth'  (Is.xiii.  10).     i8o83,Ex.  89022. 

.   'A  day  of  darkness,  and  of  thick  darkness'  (Joel 

ii.2). 

".   In    Isaiah,    where   it   treats  ...  in   particular 

about  individuals  who  are  in  darkness,  and  who  receive 
light,  and  are  regenerated,  (lx.2.) 

38.  'To  distinguish  between  the  light  and  the  dark- 
ness' (Gen.i.18).     '  Darkness '  =  falsity. 

949.  See  CHAMBER-camera,  at  this  ref. 

1 32 1.  'To  confound' = not  only  to  darken,  but  also  to 
obliterate  and  dissipate. 

I52ie.  The  noonday  light  of  the  world  is  to  the  Angels 
as  dense  darksomeness.  When  they  are  permitted  to 
look  into  that  light,  it  is  as  if  they  were  looking  at  mere 
darkness. 

I528e.  On  the  approach  of  the  life  of  mutual  love  .  .  . 
this  dim  lumen  (of  evil  Spirits)  is  turned  into  darkness ; 
for  evil  Spirits  pass  their  time  in  darkness,  and,  what  is 
wonderful,  some  even  love  darkness,  and  hate  light. 

1605.  '  The  north '  =  those  who  are  outside  the  Church ; 
those,  to  wit,  who  are  in  darkness  as  to  the  truths  of 
faith  ;  it  also  =  darkness  with  man. 


1 838.  'A  deep  sleep  fell  upon  Abram '  =  that  the  Church 
was  then  in  darkness.  'A  deep  sleep'  =  a  dark  state 
relatively  to  wakefulness.  .  .  Not  that  there  is  ever  a 
dark  state  with  the  Lord,  but  with  the  Church  ;  as  is 
the  case  in  the  other  life,  where  the  Lord  is  always  the 
Sun,  and  the  Light  itself  ;  but  before  the  evil  He  appears 
as  darkness  ;  for  the  Lord  appears  according  to  each 
person's  state.  So,  here,  it  is  applied  to  the  Church, 
when  it  is  a  dark  state. 

1 839.  '  Lo,  a  terror  of  great  darkness  falling  upon  him ' 
(Gen. xv.  12)  =  that  the  darkness  was  terrible;  and  that 
the  darkness  is  falsities,  is  evident  from  the  signification 
of  'darkness'  being  falsities.  The  state  of  the  Church 
before  its  consummation,  but  when  the  sun  was  about  to 
set,  is  described  by  'a  terror  of  great  darkness  ;'  but  the 
state  when  the  sun  has  already  set,  is  described  by  '  thick 
darkness,' in  ver.  17.     1843. 

3.  That  'a  terror  of  great  darkness  would  fall 

upon  him  '  =  that  he  would  be  horrified  at  such  a  de- 
vastation. 

4.  That  '  darkness '  =  falsities.   111. 

.    'Behold  darkness,  straitness,  and  the  light  is 

darkened' (Is. v. 30).  ' Darkness '=  falsities  ;  'the  light 
is  darkened' =  that  the  truth  does  not  appear. 

5.   'Darkness,' and  'thick  darkness'  (Zeph.i.  15)  = 

falsities  and  evils. 

6.   'If  thine    eye  be    evil,   thy    whole    body  is 

darkened  ;  if  therefore  the  lumen  that  is  in  thee  be 
darkness,  how  great  is  that  darkness'  (Matt. vi. 23). 
'  Darkness '  =  falsities,  which  have  possession  of  those 
who  are  in  Knowledges  ;  and  how  great  their  darkness 
is  in  comparison  with  that  of  the  gentiles,  who  have  no 
Knowledges,  is  what  is  meant. 

7.   'Outer  darkness'  (Matt.viii.  12;  xxii.  13)= the 

more  direful  falsities  of  those  who  are  in  the  Church  ; 
for  these  persons  darken  the  light,  and  bring  forward 
falsities  against  truths,  which  the  gentiles  cannot  do. 
4424=. 

.  'The  light  appeareth  in  darkness,  but  the  dark- 
ness comprehended  it  not'  (Johni.5).  'The  darkness' 
=  the  falsities  within  the  Church. 

8.  The  falsities  outside  the  Church  are  also  called 

'darkness,'  but  such  darkness  as  can  be  illuminated  ;  as 
in  Matthew  :  'the  people  that  sitteth  in  darkness  hath 
seen  a  great  lumen'  (iv.  16).  ' Darkness '  =  the  falsities 
of  ignorance,  such  as  exist  with  the  gentiles. 

9.   'This  is  the  judgment,  that  light  has  come  into 

the  world,  but  men  have  loved  darkness  more  than  light, 
for  their  works  are  evil'  (John  iii.  19).  'Light'  =  truths  ; 
and  'darkness,' falsities  ;  'the  Light'  also  =  the  Lord, 
because  all  truth  is  from  Him  ;  and  'the  darkness'  —  the 
Hells,  because  all  falsity  comes  thence. 

10.   '  Walk  while  ye  have  the  light,  lest  darkness 

lay  hold  upon  you  ;  for  he  who  walketh  in  darkness 
knoweth  not  whither  he  is  going.  I  have  come  a  light 
into  the  world,  that  everyone  who  believeth  in  Me  should 
not  abide  in  darkness'  (John  xii.  35,46)  .  .  .  'The  dark- 
ness '  =  falsities,  which  are  shaken  off  by  the  Lord  alone. 

e.   The  falsities  of  the  last  times,  which  are  here 

called  'darkness,'  or  of  which  is  predicated  'the  terror 
of  great  darkness,'  were  represented  and  signified  by 
'  the  darkness  over  the  whole  earth,  from  the  sixth  to 
the  ninth  hour'  (Matt.xxvii.45;  Mark  xv.  33),  and  also 


Darkness 


10 


Darkness 


by  'the  sun  being  darkened'  on  that  occasion  (Luke 
xxiii.44),  by  which  was  represented  and  signified  that  at 
that  time  there  was  no  love,  or  no  longer  any  faith. 
E.40113. 

[A.]  i860.   See  T>AHKSY,ti!i-caligo,  at  these  refs.     3. 

24053.   6832.  771 1. 2.  e.  9642-*.  105745.  H.122. 

123.    488(s).  553e-    R-iio.   -■  E.23911.  38623.    410-'. 

.  75°n- 

2353.  'Night '  =  a  time  of  darkness,  when  the  things 
of  light  are  no  longer  seen. 

2492s.  With  those  who  have  wanted  to  penetrate  into 
Divine  arcana  by  scientific,  and  especially  by  philoso- 
phical things,  and  who  would  not  believe  until  they  were 
persuaded  by  these  things,  (the  memory)  appears  dark,  j 
and  is  of  such  a  nature  as  to  absorb  the  rays  of  light, 
and  turn  them  into  darkness. 

2973s.  See  Body  at  this  ref. 

6.  The  case  is  still  worse  with  those  whose  in- 
teriors are  darkness,  while  their  exteriors  appear  to  be 
lucid  .  .  .  They  are  called  'Babel.'  Sig. 

3224.  To  those  who  are  in  the  light  of  the  world,  the 
light  of  Heaven  is  as  it  were  darkness  ;  and  to  those 
who  are  in  the  light  of  Heaven,  the  light  of  the  world  is 
as  it  were  darkness.  Ex. 

34123.  They  who  are  destitute  of  good  cannot  under- 
stand truth  .  .  .  wherefore  when  such  approach  Heaven, 
their  light  is  turned  into  mere  darkness  ;  and  their 
mind  into  the  like,  that  is,  into  stupidity. 

3^934.  'To  dispose  darkness  that  it  may  be  night' 
(Ps. civ.  20)  =  to  moderate  a  state  of  obscurity.   Ex. 

3993s.  Black  — what  is  evil  .  .  .  but  what  is  dark- 
tenebricosum  —  what  is  false  ;  and,  specifically,  principles 
of  falsity. 

42 1 45.  They  who  ascribe  all  things  to  their  own  pru- 
dence .  .  .  are  in  fatuous  lumen  .  .  .  but  when  they 
approach  any  heavenly  Society,  this  lumen  is  extin- 
guished, and  becomes  dark-tenebricostim  .  .  . 

42403.  When  the  Church  is  established  among  the 
gentiles  .  .  .  there  is  light  to  those  who  are  in  darkness. 
Sig. 

43 1 92.  Their  brain  appeared  hairy  and  darksome- 
tenebricosum. 

e.  With  those  who  only  know  .  .  .  heavenly  light 

is  not  received  .  .  .  wherefore,  when  they  approach  angelic 
Societies,  that  is,  heavenly  light,  this  light  is  with  them 
turned  into  darkness :  hence  it  is  that  their  brain 
appeared  darksome. 

439 12.  'Dense  darkness  under  His  feet'  (2  Sam.  xxii.  10) 
=  those  things  which  to  man  appear  to  be,  relatively, 
darkness  :  such  is  the  literal  sense  of  the  Word.     94065. 

4406.  Shade  and  darkness-o&ten ebratio  (are  predicated 
of  the  understanding). 

4418.  They  who  are  in  the  Hells  are  said  to  be  in 
darkness  ;  but  they  are  said  to  be  in  darkness  because 
they  are  in  falsities  ;  for  as  light  corresponds  to  truths, 
so  does  darkness  to  falsities  :  for  they  are  in  a  lumen 
like  that  of  a  charcoal  fire,  of  a  sulphurous  yellow  colour 
.  .  .  This  is  the  light  which  is  meant  by  darkness ;  for 
according  to  their  light  ...  is  their  understanding  :  it  is 


also  called  darkness,  because  their  lumens  become  dark- 
ness at  the  approach  of  heavenly  light. 

4531.  In  Hell  there  is  not  indeed  darkness,  but  there 
is  a  dim  lumen  there,  like  that  from  a  charcoal  fire  .  .  . 
This  lumen  is  what  is  called  'the  shadow  of  death,'  and 
is  compared  to  'darkness  ;'  for  it  is  turned  into  darkness 
when  they  approach  the  light  of  Heaven;  and,  when 
they  are  in  darkness,  they  are  in  folly  and  stupidity. 
Hence  it  is  evident,  that  as  light  corresponds  to  truth, 
so  does  darkness  correspond  to  falsity.     5l28e.  E.5269. 

4532.  They  who  believe  that  they  understand  what  is 
good  and  true  of  themselves  ...  in  the  other  life  are 
sometimes  let  into  a  state  of  darkness,  and  when  they 
are  in  it  they  speak  sillily  .  .  . 

465s3.  Thus  philosophical  things  are  with  them  a 
means  of  becoming  insane  .  .  .  and  therefore  they  have 
darkness  instead  of  light. 

47604.  Scientifics  are  in  the  light  of  the  world,  and,  if 
they  are  not  illuminated  by  the  light  of  Heaven,  they 
induce  darkness  .  .  . 

4783s.  They  who  are  not  in  the  affection  of  charity  are 
in  nothing  but  external  sight .  .  .  and,  from  this,  no  one 
can  look  at  higher  things,  for  they  appear  to  him  as 
darkness  .  .  . 

48444.  Unless  the  darkness  be  enlightened  by  the 
light,  that  is,  truth  by  good,  or  faith  by  charity,  there 
is  nothing  but  darkness. 

503 72.  'To  open  the  blind  eyes,  and  to  bring  the 
bound  out  of  the  prison,  and  them  that  sit  in  darkness 
out  of  the  house  of  confinement'  (Is.xlii.7)  =  those  who 
are  in  ignorance  of  good  and  truth,  yet  long  to  know  and 
imbue  them. 

504412.  '  The  prince  shall  be  borne  upon  the  shoulder 
in  the  darkness'  (Ezek.xii.  I2)  =  that  with  all  power  it 
will  be  brought  down  among  falsities  ;  for  ' darkness' = 
falsities. 

5232s.  Such  is  the  state  of  the  man  who  is  in  faith 
alone  ...  he  is  in  frost  and  darkness  ;  in  frost,  because 
he  is  against  good  ;  and  in  darkness,  because  he  is  con- 
sequently against  truth. 

5S65e.  When  Spirits  look  into  the  things  which  are  of 
the  light  of  the  world,  the  things  which  are  therein 
appear  as  mere  darkness. 

6oi5e.  That  thus  only  falsities  will  possess  the  natural 
mind,  is  signified  by  'I  will  set  darkness  upon  thy  land' 
(Ezek.xxxii.8).      ' Darkness '  =  falsities.  Befs.     E.40113. 

6400.  They,  therefore,  who  are  in  truth,  and  not  yet 
in  good,  are  in  what  is  shady  and  darksome- tenebroso  ; 
because  truth  has  no  light  from  itself .  .  . 

6406.  Things  devoid  of  order  are  darksome  and 
opaque  .  .  . 

65882  The  enlightening  of  those  who  had  been  in 
ignorance  of  the  truth  and  good  of  faith  (is  signified  by) 
'to  appear  to  those  who  are  in  darkness  and  in  the 
shadow  of  death'  (Luke  i. 79). 

6693s.  'I  will  darken  the  earth  in  the  day  of  light' 
(Amosviii.9)  =  that  falsities  will  possess  the  Church. 
96424.  E.40116. 

6829.  When  man  is  in  temptation  he  is  obsessed 
around  by  falsities  and  evils,  which  obstruct  the  influx 


Darkness 


11 


Darkness 


of  light  from  the  Divine,  that  is,  of  truth  and  good  ;  and 
the  man  is  then  as  it  were  in  darkness  :  darkness  in  the 
other  life  is  nothing  but  obsession  by  falsities  .  .  . 

7688.  'The  land  was  darkened'  (Ex.  x.  15)  =  that  falsity 
was  brought  forward  where  truth  had  been.  'Darkness' 
= falsities  ;  thus,  'to  be  darkened '= to  be  in  falsity; 
and  as  it  treats  of  the  devastation  of  those  who  had  been 
of  the  Church,  and  had  known  truths,  but  had  lived  a 
life  of  evil,  'the  land  was  darkened '= falsity  where  truth 
had  been.  As  truth  is  signified  by  'light,'  falsity  is 
signified  by  darkness  ; '  for  truth  and  falsity  are 
opposite,  like  light  and  darkness  ;  and  there  actually  is 
light  with  those  who  are  in  truth,  and  darkness  with 
those  who  are  in  falsity.  The  lumen  wherein  are  they 
who  are  in  falsity  in  the  other  life  becomes  thick  dark- 
ness at  the  presence  of  the  light  of  Heaven,  and  still 
greater  thick  darkness  with  those  who  have  been  of  the 
Church,  because  with  them  the  falsity  was  contrary  to 
the  truth  of  faith  ;  according  to  the  Lord's  words  :  '  If 
the  light  that  is  in  thee  be  darkness,  how  great  is  that 
darkness  ;'  and  again  :  'The  sons  of  the  kingdom  shall 
be  cast  into  outer  darkness'  (Matt.viii.  12)  .  .  .  'Outer 
darkness '  =  the  more  grievous  falsities ;  it  is  called 
'outer'  because  falsities  in  the  outermost  things  are 
more  grievous.     905 i2. 

2.  That  falsities  are  called  '  darkness. '  111. 

e.   '  Darkness '  also  —  ignorance  of  truth,  such  as 

prevails  with  the  gentiles  .  .  . 

8197.  'Cloud  and  darkness'  (Ex.xiv.2o)=the  con- 
densation of  falsity  from  evil.  .  .  'Darkness,'  too,  = 
falsity.  Refs.  .  .  How  it  was  that  the  pillar  brought 
darkness  on  the  Egyptians,  while  it  enlightened  the 
Sons  of  Israel.  Ex. 

8814.  (The  great  darkness  in  which  the  Israelites 
were. )  Ex.  and  Sig. 

91863.  Hence  it  is  that  they  are  in  darkness  who 
separate  good  from  truth  .  .  . 

94062.  As  the  Word  in  the  letter  is  natural  .  .  .  the 
ultimate  of  the  Word  ...  is  called,  relatively,  'clouds' 
and  'darkness.'  111. 

102276.  'The  treasures  of  darkness,  and  the  hidden 
wealth  of  hiding  places'  (Is.xlv.3)  =  such  things  as 
belong  to  heavenly  intelligence  and  wisdom,  which  are 
hidden  from  the  natural  man. 

I32e.  Truths  outside  the  Heavens  shine  coldly  .  .  . 
wherefore,  on  the  incidence  of  the  light  of  Heaven  (this 
cold  light)  disappears  ;  and  if  there  be  evil  under  it,  it 
is  turned  into  darkness. 

J.  152.  As  this  faith  (about  the  resurrection)  is  a  faith 
of  falsity,  it  induces  darkness. 

W.  188.  It  is  the  end  of  this  little  work  .  .  .  that  the 
darkness  which  envelops  the  man  of  the  Church  .  .  . 
may^be  dispelled.  .  .  The  Angels  are  in  sorrow  on  account 
of  the  darkness  on  Earth  .  .  . 

243e.  The  fire  of  their  love  and  the  light  of  it  have 
induced  darkness  .  .  . 

P.  H7e.  They  see  in  darkness,  and  nothing  in  light ; 
like  owls. 

2314.  Most  of  these  (profaners)  are  hypocrites  and 
Pharisees,  from  whom,  after  death,  everything  good  and 


true  is  taken  away,  and  then  they  are  sent  into  outer 
darkness.  Those  of  this  kind  who  have  confirmed  them- 
selves against  the  Divine  and  the  Word  ...  sit  mute  in 
that  darkness  .  .  . 

259s.  When  the  things  of  life  are  not  essentials  of 
the  Church,  man,  from  the  understanding,  is  in  mere 
darkness. 

3183.  Let  it  be  confirmed,  for  example,  that  light  is 
darkness,  and  that  darkness  is  light .  .  . 

R.  312.  See  BhACK-niger,  at  this  ref. 

386.  A  window  being  made  on  the  right  side,  I  then 
heard  them  complaining  that  they  were  in  darkness  ; 
but  presently  a  window  was  made  on  the  left  side,  that 
on  the  right  being  closed,  and  then  the  darkness  was 
gradually  dispelled  .  .  .     e,Ex. 

413.  'The  third  part  of  them  was  darkened'  (Rev. 
viii.  12)  =  that  they  did  not  know  what  love  is,  what 
faith  is,  or  any  truth.  .  .  'To  be  darkened '  —  not  to  be 
seen  and  known  on  account  of  evils  from  falsities  and 
falsities  from  evils.  .  .  The  reason  '  darkness '  =  these 
things,  is  that  '  light '  =  truth  ;  and  when  the  light  is 
extinguished  there  ensues  darkness.   111. 

3.  That  'darkness'  =  falsities  of  various  kinds.  111. 

e.   'Darkness,'  in  these  places  =  falsity  arising 

from  ignorance  of  the  truth,  or  from  a  false  principle  of 
religion,  or  from  a  life  of  evil.  Of  those  who  are  in 
falsities  of  religion,  and  thence  in  evils  of  life,  the  Lord 
says  that  'they  are  to  be  cast  into  outer  darkness' 
(Matt.viii.  12  ;  xxii.  13;  xxv.30).     T.635. 

695.  'His  kingdom  became  dark'  (Rev.xvi.  io)=that 
nothing  but  falsities  appeared.  Falsities  are  signified 
by  'darkness,'  because  truth  is  signified  by  'light.'  .  . 
But  in  their  own  sight  the  falsities  of  their  faith  do  not 
appear  dark,  that  is,  false,  but  lucid,  that  is,  true,  after 
they  have  confirmed  them  ;  but  still, .  when  they  are 
viewed  from  the  light  of  Heaven,  which  discloses  all 
things,  they  appear  dark.  Wherefore,  when  the  light 
of  Heaven  flows  into  the  chambers  of  those  who  are  in 
Hell,  it  becomes  so  dark  that  they  do  not  see  one 
another  :  wherefore  all  Hell  is  closed  .  .  .  The  reason 
they  do  not  appear  to  themselves  to  be  in  darkness,  but 
in  lumen,  although  they  are  in  falsities,  is  that  their 
falsities,  after  they  have  confirmed  them,  appear  to  them 
as  truths  ;  hence  is  their  lumen  ;  but  it  is  a  fatuous 
lumen,  as  is  the  lumen  of  the  confirmation  of  falsity  : 
this  lumen  corresponds  to  the  lumen  of  the  sight  of 
owls  and  bats,  to  which  darkness  is  lumen  and  lumen  is 
darkness ;  nay,  to  which  the  sun  is  nothing  but  thick 
darkness.     E.  989. 

M.  77s.  If  polygamists  invade  us,  they  are  cast  out 
into  the  darkness  of  the  north  ...  I  asked  what  he 
meant  by  the  darkness  of  the  north  ...  He  replied  that 
the  darkness  of  the  north  is  dulness  of  mind  and  ignor- 
ance of  truths. 

794.  As  we  entered  the  city,  it  became  darkness, 
because  the  sky  did  not  appear  ...  I  asked  those  we 
met  whether  they  could  see  .  .  .  They  replied  .  .  .  We 
see  clearly  .  .  .  The  Angel  said  to  me,  To  them  darkness 
is  light,  and  light  darkness,  as  is  the  case  with  birds  of 
night  ;  for  they  look  downwards  and  not  upwards. 


Darkness 


12 


Darkness 


[M.]  533.  See  Axgel  at  this  ref. 


D.  1402.  On   a  state  of  vastation   in   darkness.  .  . 

They  who  suppose  that  they  understand  what  is  true 
and  good  from  themselves  .  .  .  are  vastated  by  a  state 
of  darkness.  They  are  let  into  darkness  .  .  .  (See 
above,  A.  4532.) 

1403.  There  are  now  others  higher  up  .  .  .  who  say 
that  they  are  in  clear  light ;  thus  some  may  be  in  the 
surrounding  space  in  light,  while  others  are  in  dark- 
ness .  .  . 

1404.  These  things  signify  that  those  who,  because 
they  were  learned,  supposed  themselves  to  be  in  the 
greatest  light,  will  be  in  the  greatest  darkness  ;  while 
those  who  are  round  about,  who  do  not  trust  in  them- 
selves so  much,  will  be  in  the  greatest  clearness  :  for 
they  who  are  in  darkness  were  those  whom  the  world 
believed  to  be  in  the  greatest  light. 

1500.  What  the  punishment  of  the  horror  of  dark- 
ness effects.  .  .  When  they  have  been  thus  let  down  into 
the  dark  hole,  and  have  afterwards  come  into  the  day, 
in  case  they  again  lust  for  revenge,  this  horror  is  pre- 
sented to  them  ;  and  so  they  desist. 

3077.  The  life  of  the  body  with  its  ideas  is  so  obscure, 
as  to  be  relatively  darkness  .  .  . 

3385.  That  interior,  inmost,  and  still  more  supreme 
things  are  (to  Spirits)  as  the  darkness  of  the  abyss. 

3409.  The  Jews  are  thus  hidden  when  such  Spirits 
come  .  .  .  being  wrapped  about  with  darkness-^e&ro.so 
.  .  .  that  the  phantasies  of  that  wicked  Spirit  may  not 
reach  them  .  .  .  The  dragon  supposed  that  he  could 
resist  [him]  by  involving  himself  in  darkness  .  .  .  but 
he  had  to  confess  that  he  could  not,  unless  the  Lord 
protected  him. 

3539.  The  life  of  the  understanding  of  the  evil  is  like 
a  dim  lumen  thence  .  .  .  but  on  the  approach  of  celestial 
love  .  .  .  the  fiery  part  first  dies  away  .  .  .  And  on  the 
approach  of  truth,  which  is  intellectual  light,  their  fiery 
lumen  grows  dim,  and  at  last  becomes  darkness,  and 
this  according  to  the  distance  and  quality  of  the  light. 

4346.  One  who  had  had  no  conscience  was  for  a  long 
time  in  a  dark-ofrscwra-chamber,  and  said  that  he  passed 
his  time  in  darkness  and  preferred  it  to  light. 

4759e.  This  lumen  of  Hell  is  what  is  called  in  the 
Word  'darkness.' 

5698.  The  mountain  then  opened  and  swallowed  them 
up,  and  they  fell  or  were  thrust  deep  down,  and  were  sent 
into  great  darkness  ;  the  darkness  flowed  in  which  was 
possessing  them  ;  darkness  is  falsities,  which,  with  them, 
are  in  the  place  of  light. 

60S6.  A  worldly  Spirit  who  doubted  that  (spiritual 
light  is  Divine  wisdom),  because  he  was  equally  in  light 
with  those  who  were  not  worldly,  was  told  that  he  did 
not  see  there  from  his  own  light,  but  from  theirs  ;  where- 
fore their  light  was  removed,  and  he,  being  left  to  his 
own  light,  was  in  darkness.  He  was  afterwards  sent  to  a 
place  where  worldly  Spirits  could  see  although  they  were 
not  in  the  light  of  Heaven.  On  his  arrival  there,  at  first 
he  could  see  nothing  ;  but  afterwards  he  saw  as  they 
did,  for  their  eyes  were  fitted  to  darkness,  as  they  are 
with  some  birds  .  .  . 


E.  72.  'Darkness  upon  the  land'  (Ezek.xxxii.8)  = 
falsities  in  the  Church. 

1 5 14.  As  men  .  .  .  became  so  external  that  they  no 
longer  acknowledged  Divine  truth  ...  it  is  said  that 
'the  darkness  comprehended  not  the  light.'     29416. 

15211.  'If  thine  eye  be  evil,  thy  whole  body  shall  be 
darkened  ;  if  therefore  the  lumen  is  darkness,  how 
great  is  the  darkness'  .  .  .  'The  darkness '= falsities  ; 
'the  whole  body' =  the  whole  spirit  .  .  .  If  the  spirit  .  .  . 
has  only  the  understanding  of  falsity,  it  is  a  spirit  of 
darkness.     274s.   31315. 

1675.  'Even  the  darkness  does  not  make  darkness  for 
thee,  but  the  night  is  as  lucid  day  ;  as  is  the  darkness 
so  is  the  light'  (Ps.cxxxix.  12)  .  .  .  'The  darkness' = 
falsities. 

19511.  'To  cast  him  into  outermost  darkness'  (Matt. 
xxii.  1 3)  =  among  those  who  are  in  falsities  from  evil. 
'Outermost  darkness'  =  falsities  from  evil. 

2086.  'Treasures  of  darkness  and  hidden  wealth  of 
hiding  places '  =  interior  intelligence  and  wisdom  from 
Heaven  .  .  . 

239s.  The  dissipation  of  the  falsity  of  ignorance,  and 
enlightenment,  are  signified  by  '  I  will  set  their  dark- 
ness for  light'  (Is.xlii.  16). 

2742.  'To  make  the  darkness  resplendent'  (Ps.xviii. 
28)  =  to  dissipate  the  falsities  of  ignorance  by  the  light 
of  truth. 

279s.   'The  terror  of  great  darkness'  which  fell  upon 
Abram  =  the  state  of  the  Jewish  nation,  that  they  were 
[  in  the  greatest  darkness  as  to  the  truths  and  goods  of 
1  the  Church  ...     40 130. 

29415.  That  they  had  before  been  in  dense  ignorance 
and  also  in  falsities,  is  signified  by  'darkness  being  upon 
the  faces  of  the  abyss'  (Gen.i). 

35712.   'Darkness'   (Ps.xi.2)=appearances  ;    for  they 
reason  from    the  appearances  in   the   world   and  from 
fallacies,    applying  too   the   sense  of  the  letter  of  the 
!  Word. 

3722.  That  they  would  divine  falsities,  is  signified  by 
.  .  .  'darkness  shall  arise  for  you  instead  of  divination' 
(Micahiii.6). 

40552.  'Before  He  induces  darkness'  (Jer.xiii.  16)  = 
lest  falsities  take  possession. 

4818.  'Darkness'  (Is.xlix.9)  =  the  falsities  of  ignor- 
ance. 

536.  '  The  third  part  of  them  was  darkened'  =  that  all 
these  things  were  turned  into  falsities  of  evil  and  evils  of 
falsity.  '  Darkness  '^falsifies,  and  consequently  'to  be 
darkened'  =  to  be  turned  into  falsities.  The  reason  it 
=  falsities  of  evil  and  evils  of  falsity,  is  because  it  is  said 
that  the  third  part  of  the  sun  was  darkened,  the  third 
part  of  the  moon,  and  the  third  part  of  the  stars  .  .  . 

2.  The  reason  'darkness'  =  falsity,  is  that  'light' 

=  truth  ;  and  falsity  is  opposite  to  truth,  as  darkness  is 
to  light. 

3.   'Darkness,'  in  the  Word,  =  falsities  of  various 

kinds.  111. 

.   'The  sun  shall  be  turned  into  darkness,  and 

the  moon  into  blood'  (Joel  ii.3i)  =  that  at  the  end  of  the 
Church  there  will  be  the  falsity  of  evil  in  place  of  the 


Darkness 


13 


Dark  Sayings 


good  of  love,  and  the  evil  of  falsity  in  place  of  the  truth 
of  faith. 

4.  When  the   Church  is  in  darkness  and  thick 

darkness  .  .  .  that  day  is  called  'a  day  of  darkness  and 
of  thick  darkness.'  111. 

7.  That  '  darkness '= what  is  false.   111. 

.  '  To  put  darkness  for  light,  and  light  for  dark- 
ness' (Is.v.2o)  =  to  say  that  what  is  false  is  true,  and 
that  what  is  true  is  false. 

8.    'Men    loved    darkness    more    than   light '  = 

infernal  falsity,  which  is  the  falsity  of  evil.  That  it  is 
the  falsity  of  evil  which  is  here  signified  by  '  darkness, ' 
is  evident  from  its  being  said  'because  their  works  were 
evil.' 

9.   In  these  places  also  (John  i.  4, 5  ;  viii.  12  ;  xii. 

35,46)  ' darkness '  =  infernal  falsity  ;  because  'the  light,' 
to  which  the  darkness  is  opposed,  =  Divine  truth  .  .  . 
and  asJDivine  truth  is  light  in  the  Heavens,  it  follows 
that  the  falsity  of  evil,  which  is  the  falsity  in  the  Hells, 
is  'darkness.' 

10.    'He  hath  made  me  sit  in  darkness'  (Ps.cxliii. 

3)= in  falsities. 

n.   'We  await  light,  but  behold  darkness'  (Is. 

lix.9)=the  expectation  of  truth,  but  behold  falsity  ; 
'and  splendours,  but  we  walk  in  thick  darknesses '  =  the 
expectation  of  goods  through  truths,  but  behold  the  life 
of  falsity  from  evils. 

12.  The  Power  of  committing  this  crime,  the  Lord 

calls  'the  Power  of  darkness'  (Luke  xxii.53),  because 
they  were  in  the  falsities  of  evil  ;  in  falsities  concerning 
the  Lord,  and  in  evils  against  Him  :  'darkness,'  here, 
also  =  Hell,  because  there  are  such  falsities  of  evil  thei'e. 

13.  That  we  are  to  beware  that  the  truth  once 

perceived  in  the  understanding  and  received  in  the  will, 
is  not  turned  into  falsity,  which  is  done  by  evil,  is  meant 
by  'See,  therefore,  that  the  light  that  is  in  thee  be 
not  darkness'  L(Luke  xi.35)  >  f°r  thus  falsities  become 
worse. 

u.   'Sit  in   silence,  and  enter  into  darkness,  0 

daughter  of  the  Chaldeans'  (Is.xlvii. 5).  'The  daughter 
of  the  Chaldeans '  =  the  falsification  of  truth  ;  hence 
'darkness'  =  the  falsity  of  evil,  because  evil  falsifies 
truth. 

15.   'Darkness'  also  =  the  falsity  which  is  not  of 

evil,  such  as  are  the  falsities  of  religion  with  the  upright 
gentiles,  and  which  arise  from  ignorance  of  the  truth. 
111. 

16.   'Darkness'   also  —  mere    ignorance,    and    the 

deprivation  of  truth.  111. 

17.   'Darkness'    also  =  natural    lumen,    for    this, 

relatively  to  spiritual  light,  is  as  darkness  ;  wherefore, 
when  the  Angels  look  down  into  the  natural  lumen  of 
man,  such  as  prevails  in  the  natural  Knowledge  of  men, 
they  see  it  as  darkness,  and  those  who  are  in  it,  as  in 
darkness.  This  lumen  is  signified  by  'darkness'  in 
Gen.i. 

18.  As  the  sense  of  the  letter  of  the  Word  is 

natural,  it  is  called  'cloud,' and  also  'darkness,' rela- 
tively to  the  internal  spiritual  sense,  which  is  the  light 
of  Heaven,  and  is  called  'glory.' 

60116.  'Behold  darkness,  anxiety,  and  the  light  is 
darkened-obtenebrescit-in  the  ruins  thereof  (Is. v.  30), 
describes  the  vastation  of  the  Church  ;    ' darkness' = 


falsities;  'anxiety,'  evil ;  'the  darkening-o&te/je&rafr'o- 
of  the  light,'  the  vanishing  away  of  Divine  truth. 

6183.  'Putting  darkness  for  light,  and  light  for  dark- 
ness^ the  falsification  of  truth  ...  for  truth  is  falsified 
when  darkness  is  put  for  light,  and  light  for  darkness  ; 
'  darkness '  =  falsities  ;  and  '  light '  truths. 

62414.  '  Darkness  instead  of  divining' =  that  there  are 
falsities  instead  of  revealed  truths. 

65010.  As  'darkness,'  and  'night'  =  the  lumen  of  the 
natural  man  ...  it  is  evident  what  is  signified  by  'Thou 
disposest  darkness  that  there  may  be  night. ' 

659/.  'Thou  hast  set  me  in  .  .  .  darkness.'  'In  dark- 
ness' =  as  it  were  in  falsities. 

864s.  '  He  that  followeth  Me  shall  not  walk  in  dark- 
ness' (John  viii.  12)  =  that  he  shall  not  be  in  falsities. 

Dark  Sayings.     See  Riddle. 

Dart.     Jaculum. 
Throw.     Jaculari,  Jactus. 
Thrower.     Jaculator. 

A.  2685.  'By  going  away  about  a  bow-shot'  (Gen. 
xxi.  16)  =  a  state  so  far  as  it  was  distant  from  the  doctrine 
of  truth  .  .  .  '  Shot  '  =  that  it  was  as  far  away  as  possible, 
as  if  it  were  as  far  as  a  dart  can  be  let  go  from  a  bow  : 
'the  shot  of  a  bow'  is  here  mentioned,  because  a  bow  is 
predicated  of  the  spiritual  man,  and  because  he  is  'a 
shooter-jaculato7--of  the  bow.' 

2686-.  '  A  bow '  =  the  doctrine  of  truth  ;  and  this  from 
the  missiles-^efo's,  arrows,  or  darts,  which  =  the  doctrinal 
things  from  whicli  and  with  which  they  combat, 
especially  they  who  are  spiritual,  and  who  were  there- 
fore called  in  ancient  times  'shooters  of  the  bow.'  111. 

2709.  'He  was  a  shooter  of  the  bow'  (ver.  20)  =  the 
man  of  the  Spiritual  Church  ;  as  is  evident  from  the 
signification  of  'a  dart,'  ' shah-teli, '  or  'arrow,'  whicli 
is  truth  ...  or  rather  doctrinal  things.   111. 

4.  As  many  things  in  the  Word  have  an  opposite 

sense,  so  have  'darts,'  '  shaits-tela, "  arrows, '  'a  bow, 'and 
'a  shooter  ;'  and  they = falsities,  the  doctrine  of  falsity, 
and  those  who  are  in  falsity.   111. 

.   'To  shoot  in  secret  at  the  upright ;  suddenly 

will  they  shoot  at  him'  (Ps.lxiv.4). 

.   'They  make  ready  the  arrow  upon  the  string,. 

to  shoot  in  very  darkness  those  who  are  right  in  heart ' 
(Ps.xi.2). 

3309-.  The  weapons  of  hunting,  which  were  quiver, 
bow,  and  arrows  =  the  doctrinal  things  of  truth.  Refs. 

5354s.  Hence  the  sons  of  Ephraim  are  called  'shooters 
with  the  bow'  (Ps.lxxviii.9). 

6421.  'They  shoot'  (Gen.xlix.23)  =  that  they  combat 
from  (falsities).  'To  shoot '  =  to  combat  from  falsities  ; 
for  'a  bow '  =  doctrine,  and  the  darts  or  missiles-te/a, 
those  things  which  are  of  doctrine  ;  thus  truths  of 
doctrine  with  those  who  are  in  truths,  and  falsities  of 
doctrine  with  those  who  are  in  falsities  :  the  reason  'to 
shoot'  here -to  combat  from  falsities,  is  that  it  here 
treats  of  those  who  are  in  falsities. 

6422.  See  Archer  at  this  ref. 

S800.   '  Or  in  shooting  he  shall  be  executed  with  darte" 


Dart 


14 


Dash 


( Ex.  xix.  13)  =  that  spiritual  good  would  also  perish.  '  To 
be  executed  with  darts  '  =  to  perish  as  to  spiritual  good  ; 
for  'a  shooter  of  the  bow '  =  the  spiritual  man. 

P.  3333.  If  a  shooter,  or  marksman,  should  aim  at  a 
target  .  .  .  and  should  err  in  his  aim  by  a  finger's 
breadth,  at  the  end  of  a  mile  the  daxb-telun*-m  ball 
would  depart  very  far  from  the  line. 

E.  357.  'Arrows,'  'darts,'  and  'shafts-ie/«'  =  the  truths 
of  doctrine  which  combat.   111. 

2.  Combat  against  evils  and  falsities,  is  described 

by  'the  daughters  shall  exasperate  him,  and  they  shall 
shoot,  and  the  archers  shall  hate  him'  :  ' daughters '  = 
those  who  are  in  evils,  and,  through  falsities,  want  to 
destroy  goods ;  those  who  assault  through  evils  are 
sionified  by  'they  will  shoot'  ;  and  those  who  do  so 
through  falsities  of  evil,  by  'the  archers  who  will  hate 
him.'     448s. 

35711.  'Ephraim'  =  the  understanding  of  truth,  and 
'his  sons,'  truths  themselves,  wherefore  they  are  called 
'shooters  of  the  bow,'  that  is,  fighters  against  evils  and 
falsities. 

12.   'To  shoot'  (Ps.xi.2)  =  to  deceive.     ■ -14. 

Dart.     Telum. 

A.  26862.  See  Dart-,/ aculum,  at  these  refs.  2709. 
4.  6421.  E.357. 

3.   'The  arrows  of  Jehovah  are  sharp,  and  all  His 

bows  are  bent'  (Is.v.28)  .  .  .  ' Arrows '  =  spiritual  truths. 

6.   'The  bow  with  the  arrows'  (Ezek.xxxix.9)  = 

doctrine  and  its  truths  :  truths  themselves,  when  sepa- 
rated from  goods,  in  the  other  life  appear  ...  as  darts. 

60009.  'The  arrow  that  flieth  by  day'  (Ps.xci.5)  =  tke 
falsity  which  is  openly  taught,  by  which  good  is 
destroyed.     710210.  9642s. 

7729s.  'Whose  arrows  are  sharp,  and  all  their  bows 
bent.'  ' Arrows '  =  the  doctrinal  things  of  falsity  from 
which  the  combat  is  waged.     8215". 

88135.  'The  arrow  which  shall  go  forth  as  the  light- 
ning' (Zech.ix.  14)  — the  truth  Divine  which  reproves 
and  penetrates. 

91414.  'A  shield,'  and  'the  shafts'  which  belong  to  a 
bow= truths  of  doctrine  from  the  Word,  by  means  of 
which  there  is  protection  from  the  falsities  of  evil. 
Refs. 

P.  2023.  It  is  like  a  shaft  let  go  from  a  bow,  which, 
if  at  first  it  should  decline  ever  so  little  from  the  mark, 
at  the  distance  of  a  mile  would  diverge  immensely. 
(See  also  DxKY-jaculum,  at  P. 333.) 

T.  86.  The  Divine  truth  from  the  Divine  good  is  .  .  . 
as  a  bow  with  arrows  .  .  . 


E.  257.  'Arrows,'  etc.  (Ezek.xxxix.9)  =  all  things 
which  belong  to  doctrine.  'To  kindle  fire  with  them 
seven  years '  =  to  completely  consume  them  all  by  means 
of  evils. 

273s.  'The  arrows  which  went  abroad'  (Ps.lxxvii.  17) 
mean  lightnings,  whereby  there  appear  as  it  were 
arrows-saflftttac-from  a  bow,  which  are  present  when 
there  are  thunder  and  lightning,  and  by  these  are  sig- 
nified Divine  truths. 


336".  The  falsities  which  are  known  to  be  falsities 
are  meant  by  'the  arrow  that  ilieth  by  day.' 

35532.  'The  arrows  which  are  sharp,  and  the  bows 
which  are  bent' =  falsities  of  doctrine  prepared  for  the 
destruction  of  truths.     35721. 

357.  Their  enlightenment  in  truths  is  described  by 
these  words,  'His  arrow  shall  go  forth  as  the  lightning, 
and  the  Lord  Jehovih  shall  sound  with  the  trumpet, 
and  shall  march  in  the  storms  of  the  south.'  'The 
arrow  which  shall  go  forth  as  the  lightning '  =  truth 
enlightened  ;  thus  truth  from  the  good  of  love. 

9.   'A   pure  shaft'   (Is.xlix.2)=truth   dispersing 

evil. 

12.  See  Arrow  at  this  ref. 

.    'They  make  ready  the  arrow  upon  the  string' 

(Ps.xi.2)  =  that  they  fit  falsities  into  doctrine  which 
appear  like  truths. 

14.   '  They  stretch  their  arrow  with  a  bitter  word, 

in  order  to  shoot  the  upright  in  secret '  (Ps.lxiv.4,5)  .  .  . 
As  'an  arrow '  =  falsity  of  doctrine,  it  is  said,  'they 
stretch  their  arrow  with  a  bitter  word.' 

16.   'His  arrows  as  of  a  strong  one,  there  shall 

not  return  anything  vain'  (Jer.  1.9)  =  that  they  will 
thence  be  imbued  with  mere  falsities. 

23.   '  He  prepares  the  vessels  of  death,  and  makes 

his  arrows  burning'  (Ps.vii.  13)  =  that  he  makes  for 
himself  principles  of  falsity  from  infernal  love,  whereby 
he  destroys  good  and  its  truths. 

e.   'The  bow  with  the  arrows'  (Ezek.xxxix.9)  = 

doctrine  with  its  falsities. 

40117.  That  then  genuine  truths  and  goods  do  not 
appear  to  them,  but  in  their  place  fatuous  truths  and 
goods,  which  in  themselves  are  falsities  and  evils,  is 
signified  by  'For  light  thine  arrows  go  abroad,  for 
resplendence  the  thunderbolt  of  thy  spear'  (Hab.iii.  11). 
'Arrows,'  or  lightnings  =  fatuous  truths  which  in  them- 
selves are  falsities. 

5029.  '  The  arrow  which  shall  go  forth  as  the  lightning ' 
=  truth  dispersing  and  destroying. 

59414.  'Thine  arrows  went  abroad'  (Ps.  lxxvii)  = 
Divine  truths  thence  derived. 

68415.   'Arrows'  (Ps.xlv.5)  =  truths  combating. 

72410.  'Sons  of  the  youth  which  are  like  arrows  in 
the  hand  of  a  mighty  one'  (Ps. cxxvii.4)  =  the  truths  of 
the  Ancient  Church,  which  were  natural  truths  from  the 
Spiritual;  this  Church  is  meant  by  'youth';  and  as 
these  truths  possess  all  power  against  falsities  and  evils, 
it  is  said,  'as  arrows  in  the  hand  of  a  mighty  one' : 
'  arrows '  =  truths  which  destroy  falsities. 

Dash.     Allidere. 

A.  89025.  'The  little  ones  shall  be  dashed  in  pieces' 
(Is.xiii.  16)  =  that  they  will  utterly  extinguish  innocence. 

6.   'To  be  dashed  in  pieces,'  etc.  =the  extinction 

of  faith  and  charity. 


E.  65226.  'To  be  dashed  in  pieces  at  the  head  of  all 
the  streets'  (Nahum  iii. io)  =  to  be  dispersed  and  to 
perish. 

7  io24.  '  Their  bows  shall  dash  the  young  men  in  pieces, 
and  they  shall  have  no  pity  on  the  fruit  of  the  belly ' 


Dates 


15 


Daughter 


(Is.xiii.  i8)  =  that  falsities  of  doctrine  will   destroy  all 
the  understanding  of  truth  and  all  the  good  of  love. 

Dates.  {Fixing  the  time.)  D.4573.  4620.  5032. 
5099.  5239-  5336.  5366-  56oo.  5699.  5746.  5841. 
5980.  5994.  5997-  6000.  6009.  6019.  6022.  60334. 

6082.  60886.  6097.  6107.  61  io28. 73.  D.Min.4725. 

4773.  4831.  J.(Post.)i04.  D.Wis.vii.   ie. 

Daub.     Illinere.     See  Besmear. 

P.  i53e.  It  is  as  if  they  had  daubed  faith  over  all 
things  of  the  Word,  as  one  who  daubs  writing  with 
vermilion,  so  that  nothing  which  is  beneath  it  appears. 

T.  1345.  The  Angel  said,  I  have  observed  that  the 
priests  prepare  eye-salve  from  the  Word  not  interiorly 
understood,  which  they  daub  on  the  eyes  blinded  by 
their  faith. 

797s.  (Melancthon)  bedaubed  the  paper  with  the 
same  error  .  .  . 

Daughter.    Filia. 

A.  54e.  From  (the  Most  Ancient  Church)  emanated 
the  phrase,  which  became  customary,  that,  from  the 
affection  of  good,  the  Church  itself  was  called  '  daughter, ' 
and  also  'virgin'  .  .  .  and  'wife.' 

552.  The  fruits  thence  derived,  which  are  of  truth, 
are  called  'sons' ;  and  the  fruits  which  are  of  good, 
'  daughters. ' 

253.  From  the  heavenly  and  angelic  proprium,  the 
Church  is  called  in  the  Word,  'woman,'  'wife,'  'bride,' 
'virgin,'  'daughter.' 

489.  'Sons  and  daughters' =  the  truths  and  goods 
which  they  perceived  ;  'sons,'  truths  ;  and  'daughters,' 
goods  ;  for  the  conceptions  and  births  of  the  Church,  in 
the  Word,  as  of  old,  are  called  'sons  and  daughters.' 
111. 

.   '  Thy  sons  shall  come  from  far,  and  thy  daughters 

shall  be  nursed  at  thy  side'  (Is.lx.4)  ;  '  sons '  =  truths  ; 
and  'daughters,'  goods. 

.   'Deliver  me  and  snatch  me  from  the  hand  of 

strange  sons,  whose  mouth  speaketh  vanity  ;  our  sons 
are  as  great  plantations  made  in  their  childhood ;  our 
daughters  as  corners,  cut  out  in  the  form  of  a  temple' 
(Ps.cxliv.  11,12) :  'strange  sons'  =  spurious  or  false 
truths  ;  '  our  sons '  -  the  doctrinal  things  of  truth  ; 
'daughters,'  the  doctrinal  things  of  good.     D.4i40e. 

.   '  I  will  say  to  the  north,  Give  ;  and  to  the  south 

wind,  Keep  not  back  ;  bring  My  sons  from  far,  and  My 
daughters  from  the  extremity  of  the  earth'  (Is.xliii.6) : 
' sons '  —  truths  ;  'daughters,' goods.     14582. 

.   'Sons  and  daughters'  (Jer.iii. 24)  =  truths  and 

goods. 

490.  '  Daughters '  =  goods  many  times  in  the  Word; 
as  in  David  :  'The  daughters  of  kings  among  thy 
precious  ones  .  .  .  The  daughter  of  Tyre  for  a  gift,  the 
king's  daughter  is  all-glorious  within'  (Ps.xlv.9, 12,13)  > 
where  the  good  and  beauty  of  love  and  faith  are  described 
by  'daughter' :  hence  Churches  are  called  'daughters,' 
and  that  from  goods  ;  as  'the  daughter  of  Sion,'  and 
'the  daughter  of  Jerusalem.'  They  are  also  called 
'daughters  of  the  people'  (Is.xxii.4) ;  'the  daughter  of 


Tharshish'  (Is.xxiii.  10) ;  'the  daughter  of  Sidon'  (ver. 
12)  ;  'daiighters  in  the  field'  (Ezek.xxvi.6,8). 

491.  The  same  things  are  signified  by  'sons  and 
daughters'  in  this  chapter  (Gen.v.4,7, 10, 13,16, 19,26, 
30) ;  but  such  as  the  Church  is,  such  are  the  sons  and 
daughters,  or  the  goods  and  truths  :  here,  they  =  the 
truths  and  goods  which  they  distinctly  perceived, 
because  they  are  predicated  of  the  Most  Ancient  Church, 
which  was  the  principal  and  parent  of  the  other  and 
succeeding  ones.     532. 

555.  See  Cupidity  at  this  ref. 

568.  'Daughters'  (Gen.vi.  i)  =  the  things  belonging 
to  the  will  of  that  man,  thus  cupidities.  .  .  'Daughters,' 
or  goods,  belong  to  the  will ;  but  such  as  the  man  is, 
such  is  the  understanding  and  such  the  will,  thus  such 
are  'the  sons  and  daughters. '  It  here  treats  of  a  corrupt 
man,  who  has  no  will,  but  mere  cupidity  instead,  which 
they  suppose  to  be,  and  also  call,  will  .  .  . 

2.  The   reason    '  daughters  '  =  the   things   of  the 

will,  and,  when  there  is  no  will,  cupidities  ;  and  the 
reason  '  sons '  =  the  things  of  the  understanding,  and, 
when  there  is  no  understanding  of  truth,  phantasies,  is 
that  the  female  sex  is  of  such  a  nature,  and  is  so  formed, 
that  will  or  cupidity  reigns  above  understanding  ;  such 
is  the  whole  disposition  of  their  fibres  ;  such  is  their 
nature.  But  the  male  sex  is  so  formed,  that  understand- 
ing or  reason  reigns  ;  such,  too,  is  the  disposition  of 
their  fibres  ;  such  is  their  nature  .  .  . 

569.  'The  sons  of  God  saw  the  daughters  of  man, 
that  they  were  good,  and  took  them  wives  of  all  whom 
they  chose'  (ver.2)  =  that  the  doctrinal  things  of  faith 
conjoined  themselves  with  cupidities  ;  with  any  whatever. 

1336.  '(Shem)  begat  sons  and  daughters'  (Gen.xi.  n) 
=  doctrinal  things.     1338. 

1341.  '(Arphaxad)  begat  sons  and  daughters'  (ver.  13) 
=  doctrinal  things. 

1344.  '(Shelah)  begat  sons  and  daughters'  (ver.  15)  = 
doctrinal  tilings. 

1346.  '(Eber)  begat  sons  and  daughters'  (ver.  17)  = 
doctrinal  things  which  are  rituals. 

201 55.  'They  will  bring  thy  sons  in  the  bosom,  and 
thy  daughters  shall  be  carried  on  the  shoulder'  (Is.xlix. 
22):  'daughters' = goods  ;  'sons,' truths. 

2362.  See  Affection  of  Good  at  these  refs.  30242. 
3066.  3067.   3834.  3848.  4134.  4177.  4200.  4215.  4643. 

2391.  'Daughters'  (Gen.xix.  I2)  =  the  affections  of 
good  and  truth  ;  or,  what  is  the  same,  those  who  are  in 
these  affections.     2400.  2407. 

2461.  '(Lot's)  two  daughters  with  him' (ver. 30)  =  its 
affections  in  like  manner  (impure).  '  Daughters  '= 
affections  ;  but  such  as  the  good  is,  such  are  the  affec 
tions  ;  even  spurious  and  impure  good  has  its  affections 
.  .  .     2465. 

2464.  '(Lot's)  two  daughters '= the  affections  thence 
derived,  which  are  of  such  good  and  such  falsity :  the 
good  from  which  the  affections  are,  is  'Lot,'  and  the 
truth  from  which  they  ai'e,  was  'Lot's  wife.'  When 
this  has  become  'a  statue  of  salt,'  that  is,  when  the  good 
of  truth  is  vastated,  then  such  good  exists  as  is  signified 


Daughter 


16 


Daughter 


by  Lot  in  the  cave,  and  such  affections  therefrom  as  are 
signified  by  his  'daughters.' 

[A.]  246610.  'Daughters,'  and  'daughters-in-law'  (Hos. 
iv.  13)  =  such  affections. 

u.  As  'whoredom'  has  such  a  signification,  and 

'  daughters  '  =  affections,  it  was  so  severely  forbidden 
that  a  priest's  daughter  should  commit  whoredom  (Lev. 
xxi.9). 

2567s.  'Your  sons  and  your  daughters  shall  prophesy' 
(Joel  ii. 28).  .  .  ' Sons '  =  truths  themselves  ;  'daughters,' 
goods  themselves.  Refs. 

10.  See  Cook  at  this  ref. 

3024.  See  Affection  at  this  ref. 

3.  Hence  it  is  evident  that  'the  daughters  of  the 

gentiles,'  'the  daughters  of  the  Philistines,'  'the  daugh- 
ters of  Egypt,'  'the  daughters  of  Tyre  and  Sidon,'  'the 
daughters  of  Edom,'  'the  daughters  of  Moab,'  'the 
daughters  of  the  Chaldeans,  and  of  Babel,'  'the  daugh- 
ters of  Sodom,  '=affections  of  evil  and  falsity,  from 
which  come  these  religiosities  ;  thus,  they  =  the  religi- 
osities  themselves.   111.     4335. 

.    'The   daughters   of   the   magnificent   nations' 

(Ezek.xxxii.  16, 1 8)  =  affections  of  evil. 

4.   'The   daughter   of  Egypt'    (Jer.xlvi.  n)  =  the 

affection  of  reasoning  about  the  truths  of  faith, 
whether  it  is  so,  from  scientifics  ;  thus,  she  =  the  religi- 
osity which  thence  originates  .  .  . 

6.   It  is  evident  that  in  these  passages  ' daughters' 

do  not  mean  daughters,  but  affections  which  disagree 
with  truth  ;  thus,  the  religiosities  thence  derived  ;  (and 
what  these  are  is  determined  by  the  signification  of  the 
various  nations  mentioned). 

30816.  'The  king's  daughter'  (Ps.xlv.  I3)  =  the  Lord's 
Spiritual  Kingdom  ;  'her  friends,  the  virgins  after  her' 
=  affections  of  truth.     5044™. 

31033.  'The  daughters  of  Zion  who  uplift  themselves' 
(Is. iii.  1 6)  =  affections  of  evil  within  the  Church. 

3110.  'Whose  daughter  art  thou?'  (Gen.xxiv.23)  = 
further  exploration  concerning  innocence.  Ex. 

3620.  '  I  loathe  my  life,  on  account  of  the  daughters 
of  Heth'  (Gen.xxvii.46)  =  the  adjunction  of  natural 
truth  from  another  source.  .  .  'The  daughters  of  Heth' 
=  affections  of  truth  from  what  is  not  genuine  ;  here,  of 
natural  truth,  because  it  is  said  concerning  Jacob.     3621. 

3621.  '  If  Jacob  takes  a  woman  from  the  daughters  of 
Heth'  (id. )  =  that  natural  truth  was  not  to  be  associated 
with  them. 

3622.  'As  these,  are  the  daughters  of  the  land'  (id.) 
—  because  not  from  this  ground,  that  is,  from  the  truths 

of  the  genuine  Church.  '  Daughters '  —  Churches  ;  for 
' daughters '=  the  affections  of  good  and  truth  ;  and  'the 

land,'  the  tract  where  the  Church  is,  thus,  the  Church  : 

thus,  'the  daughters  of  the  land '  =  the  goods  and  truths 

of  the  Church. 

3662.  'Thou  shalt  not  take  a  woman  from  the 
daughters  of  Canaan'  (Gen.xxviii. i)  =  that  it  should 
not  be  conjoined  with  affections  of  falsity  and  evil.  .  . 
' Daughters'  =  affections.  Refs.     3665.  3683. 

3686.  'Esau  saw  that  the  daughters  of  Canaan  were 
evil  in  the  eyes  of  Isaac  his  father'  (ver.8)  =  the  foresight 


and  providence  of  the  Lord  that  the  affections  of  that 
truth  with  which  natural  good  had  heretofore  been 
conjoined,  would  not  conduce  to  conjunction.  .  .  'The 
daughters  of  Canaan,'  here,  the  daughters  of  Heth  = 
the  affections  of  truth  from  what  is  not  genuine.  Ex. 

37032.  '  Father '  =  good  ;  and  '  mother, '  truth  ;  in  fact, 
that  good  and  truth  from  which  come  the  lower  or 
derivative  goods  and  truths,  which  are  relatively  as 
daughters  and  sons  ;  and  are  therefore  called  'daughters 

and  sons '  in  the  Word.     15,I11.    3908.  4835s.  4843. 

H.382a.  E.  166. 

12.   'The  king's  daughter '=  the  love  of  truth  .  .  . 

because  it  treats  here  of  the  Lord  and  His  Divine 
Human.     59547.  9688e.  99427. 

15.   'The  daughter  of  a  priest '  =  the  affection  of 

good. 

37932.  'Laban'  represents  the  good  of  a  common,  but 
collateral  stock  .  .  .  Hence  the  daughters  from  that  good, 
(Rachel  and  Leah,)  represent  affections  in  the  Natural ; 
for  these  are  as  daughters  from  that  good  as  a  father. 

3818.  'The  two  daughters  of  Laban'  (Gen.xxix.i6)  = 
the  affections  of  truth  from  the  good  of  a  common  stock. 
'  Daughters '  =  affections  ;  here,  the  affections  of  truth 
from  the  good  represented  by  Laban. 

3824.  'I  will  serve  thee  seven  years  for  Rachel  thy 
younger  daughter'  (ver.  18)  =  assiduity,  and  subsequently 
a  holy  state  in  order  to  be  conjoined  with  internal  truth. 

3939.  'In  my  happiness  because  the  daughters  will 
make  me  happy'  (Gen.xxx.i3)  =  the  delight  of  the 
affections  which  corresponds  to  the  happiness  of  eternal 
life.  .  .  '  The  daughters  who  will  make  happy '  =  Churches . 

3963.  'Afterwards  she  bare  a  daughter'  (ver.2i)  = 
the  affection  of  all  (the  general  truths),  and  also  the 
Church  of  a  faith  in  which  is  good,  (that  is,  the  Spiritual 
Church).  Ex. 

4139.  'Thou  hast  not  permitted  me  to  kiss  my  sons 
and  my  daughters'  (Gen. xxxi. 28)  =  disjunction  in  con- 
sequence of  a  free  state  according  to  the  faith  of  this 
good.  .  .  ' Sons '  =  truths  ;  and  'daughters,'  goods. 

4185.  'The  daughters  are  my  daughters,  and  the 
sons  are  my  sons,  and  the  flock  is  my  flock'  (ver. 43)  = 
that  all  the  affections  of  truth,  and  all  the  truths  and 
goods  were  his.  'Daughters,'  here  those  of  Rachel  and 
Leah,  =the  affections  of  truth.     4215. 

4187.  'And  to  my  daughters,  what  shall  I  do  to 
them  this  day,  or  to  their  sons  whom  they  have  borne  ? ' 
(id.  )  =  that  he  dare  not  claim  them.  '  Daughters  '  = 
affections  of  truth. 

4429.  '  To  see  the  daughters  of  the  land '  (Gen.  xxxi  v.  1 ) 
=  to  Know  the  affections  of  truth  and  the  Churches 
thence  derived. 

e.    'The  daughters   of  the  land '  =  the  Churches 

among  the  ancients.  Everywhere  in  the  Word,  in  the 
internal  sense,  '  daughters '  =  Churches. 

44343.  'To  love  and  betroth  the  daughter  of  a  strange 
God'  (Mal.ii.  u)  =  to  conjoin  one's  self  with  falsity,  in 
place  of  truth,  which  is  'the  wife  of  the  youth.' 

4.  '  Sons '  (Ezek.  xvi.  20)  =  truths ;  and  '  daughters, ' 

their  affections. 

4450.    'Give  your  daughters  unto  us,  and  take  our 


Daughter 


17 


Daughter 


daughters  unto  you'  (Gen.xxxiv.9)  =  tlie  union  of  goods 
and  truths.  .  .  '  Daughters  '  =  affections,  thus  goods.  44§3- 

4470.  'We  will  take  our  daughter  and  go'  (ver.  17)  = 
that  there  is  no  conjunction.  Ex. 

4677s.  As  kings  represented  the  Lord  as  to  Divine 
truth  .  .  .  their  daughters  were  clothed  in  coats  of 
various  colours  ;  for  by  'daughters'  were  signified  the 
affections  of  good  and  truth,  and  thence  Churches.   9942s. 

4782.  'And  all  his  daughters'  (Gen. xxxvii. 35)  =  those 
who  are  in  evils.  ' Daughters'  —  goods,  and,  in  the 
opposite  sense,  evils  ;  or,  those  who  are  in  goods  or 
evils.  Refs. 

4818.  'Judah  saw  there  the  daughter  of  a  man,  a 
Canaanite'  (Gen.xxxviii.2)  =  the  affection  of  evil  from 
the  falsity  of  evil  .  .  .  'Daughter'  =  the  affection  of 
good  ;  and,  in  the  opposite  sense,  the  affection  of  evil. 

48432.  The  life  of  evil  is  signified  by  'the  daughters 
committing  whoredom'  (Hos.iv.  13)  ;  and  the  doctrine  of 
falsity  from  which  is  the  life  of  evil,  by  'the  daughters- 
in-law  committing  adultery. ' 

3.   'The  daughter  rising  up  against  her  mother' 

(Micah  vii.6)  =  that  the  affection  of  evil  does  so  against 
truth  ;  'and  the  daughter-in-law  against  her  mother-in- 
law^  that  the  affection  of  falsity  does  so  against  good. 

5      6_ 

5332.  'He  gave  him  Asenath  the  daughter  of  Poti- 
pherah  priest  of  On  for  a  woman'  (Gen.xli.45)  =  the 
quality  of  the  marriage  of  truth  with  good,  and  of  good 
with  truth  .  .  .  'The  daughter  of  the  priest  of  On'  =  the 
truth  of  good  ;  for  'daughter' =  the  affection  of  truth  ; 
and  'a  priest'  =  good. 

6021.  'His  daughters  and  his  sons'  daughters' 
(Gen.xlvi.7)  =  goods  in  order.  'Daughters' =  goods  ; 
and  so  also  do  'sons'  daughters,'  but  the  goods  which 
are  from  the  former,  thus  in  their  order. 

61383.  'He  that  loveth  son  and  daughter  more  than 
Me  is  not  worthy  of  Me'  (Matt. x. 37).  'Father  and 
mother,'  here = those  things  in  general  which  are  of 
man's  proprium  from  heredity  ;  and  '  son  and  daughter, ' 
those  things  which  are  of  man's  proprium  from  actuality. 

641 34.  'The  daughter  of  Zion'  (Lam. i. 6)  =  the  affec- 
tion of  good,  which  is  of  the  Celestial  Church. 

6419.  'Of  a  daughter,  she  marcheth  upon  the  wall' 
(Gen.xlix.22)  =  to  fight  against  falsity.  'A  daughter '  = 
the  Church  ;  here,  the  Spiritual  Church,  because  that  is 
treated  of. 

6432s.   'Daughters'  (Is.xxxii.9)  =  affections. 

6677.  'If  she  be  a  daughter,  even  let  her  live'  (Ex. 
i.  i6)  =  not  (to  be  destroyed)  if  it  is  good  .  .  .  for,  when 
the  infernals  infest,  they  are  allowed  to  assault  truths, 
but  not  goods.  Ex. 

6729.  'The  daughter  of  Pharaoh  went  down'  (Ex.ii.5) 
=  the  religiosity  there.  '  Daughter '  =  the  affection  of 
truth  and  of  good,  and  thence  the  Church  ;  but,  in  the 
opposite  sense,  the  affection  of  falsity  and  of  evil,  and 
thence  the  religiosity  which  is  from  them  ;  here,  the 
religiosity  from  false  scientifics,  because  it  is  the  daughter 
of  Pharaoh.     6739. 

.  That    'daughters,'   in   the   Word,  =  Churches  ; 

B 


and  also  that  '  daughters '  =  the  religiosities  of  many 
nations,  which  are  false.   111. 

e.   'The   daughter  of  Egypt'   (Jer.xlvi.u)  =  the 

affection  of  reasoning  concerning  the  truths  of  faith, 
whether  it  is  so,  from  scientifics,  when  the  Negative 
reigns  ;  thus  =  the  religiosity  which  thence  originates  ; 
and  which  is  of  such  a  character  that  nothing  is  believed 
except  what  is  false. 

6740e.  'The  daughters  which  are  earned  by  nurses  at 
thy  side'  (Is.lx.4)  =  the  goods  which  are  continually 
being  insinuated  ;  for  'daughters' =  good  ;  and  'nurses,' 
those  things  which  insinuate. 

6745e.  'The  daughter  of  My  people  is  cruel'  (Lam. 
iv.3)  =  the  Spiritual  Church  ;  here,  vastated. 

6750.  'She  brought  him  to  the  daughter  of  Pharaoh' 
(Gen.ii.  io)  =  tothe  affection  of  scientifics.  'The  daughter 
of  Pharaoh '  =  a  religiosity  ;  but  here,  the  affection  of 
scientifics  ;  for  it  is  the  third  state  which  is  described  in 
this  verse,  and,  in  that  case,  '  daughter '  =  affection  ;  and 
'Pharaoh,'  what  is  scientific  in  general;  thus,  'the 
daughter  of  Pharaoh '  =  the  affection  of  scientifics.  Ex. 

6775.  'The  priest  of  Midian  had  seven  daughters' 
(Ex.ii.  16)  =  the  holy  things  of  that  Church.  'The 
daughters  of  a  priest' =  the  things  of  the  Church; 
'daughter' =  the  Church;  'priest,'  the  good  of  love; 
thus,  'the  daughters  of  a  priest' =  the  Church  as  to 
good  :  '  Midian  '  =  those  who  are  in  the  truths  of  simple 
good;  and  ' seven '  =  what  is  holy;  thus,  'the  priest  of 
Midian  had  seven  daughters' =  the  holy  things  of  the 
Church  belonging  to  those  who  are  in  the  truths  of 
simple  good. 

6788.  'He  said  to  his  daughters'  (ver. 20)  =  thought 
concerning  the  holy  things  of  the  Church.  'Daughters' 
=  the  holy  things  of  the  Church  ;  the  holy  things  which 
arc  here  signified  by  'daughters'  are  truths,  which,  in 
the  Word,  are  called  '  holy "... 

6793.  'He  gave  Zipporah  his  daughter  to  Moses' 
(ver.2i)  =  that  he  adjoined  to  him  the  good  of  his  own 
Church.  .  .  ' Daughter '  =  good,  and  also  the  Church; 
'  Zipporah '  —  the  quality  of  the  good  of  that  Church. 

6919.  'Ye  shall  put  them  on  your  sons  and  your 
daughters' (Ex. iii.22)  =  application  to  their  truths  and 
to  their  goods.  'Sons' =  truths  ;  and  'daughters,' 
goods. 

7662.  'With  our  sons  and  with  our  daughters'  (Ex. 
x.  9)  =  those  who  are  in  the  affection  of  truth  and  in  the 
affection  of  good.  '  Sons  '  =  the  truths  of  the  Church, 
thus  affections,  because  truths  without  affections  are 
not  anything ;  and  'daughters'  =  goods,  thus,  the 
affections  of  good. 

7729s.  'The  daughter  of  Zion'  (Micah  iv.  13)  =  the 
Celestial  Church.     E.i76e. 

8890.  'Thou  shalt  not  do  any  work,  thou,  nor  thy 
son,  nor  thy  daughter,'  etc.  (Ex. xx.  10)  =  Heaven  and 
happiness  for  each  and  all  things  in  the  internal  and 
external  of  man  .  .  .  ' Thou '  =  the  man  himself;  'son,' 
his  Intellectual ;  'daughter,'  his  Voluntary,  both  in  the 
internal  man  .  .  .  The  reason  'son'  =  the  Intellectual,  is 
that  '  son '  =  truth,  for  truths  constitute  the  Intellectual ; 
and  the  reason  'daughter'  =  the  Voluntary,  is  that 
' daughter' =  good,  for  goods  constitute  the  Voluntary. 


Daughter 


18 


Daughter 


[A.]  89044.   'Daughters'  (Ezek.xvi. 20)  =  goods. 

8982.  'If  she  bear  him  sons  and  daughters'  (Ex. 
xxi. 4)  =  truths  and  goods  thence  derived.  'Sons'  = 
truths  ;  and  'daughters,'  goods. 

8993.  'When  a  man  has  sold  his  daughter  for  a  maid- 
servant' (Ex. xxi.  7)  =  the  affection  of  truth  from  natural 
delight.  'The  daughter  of  a  man '= the  affection  of 
truth  ;  for  ' daughter '  =  affection  ;  and  'man,'  truth. 

e.  They  who  are  in  the  genuine  affection  of  truth, 

in  the  representative  sense,  are  'the  daughters  of  the 
men  of  the  Israelites  ; '  but  they  who  are  in  an  affection 
of  truth  which  is  not  genuine,  are  'maidservants  from 
the  daughters  of  Israel.' 

9001.  'According  to  the  judgment  of  daughters  shall 
he  do  to  her'  (ver.9)=that  it  shall  be  as  is  the  genuine 
affection  of  truth  .  .  .  'Daughter'  =  the  affection  of 
truth ;  here,  the  genuine  affection  of  truth ;  for  'a 
maidservant' =  the  affection  of  truth  from  natural  de- 
light ;  thus  not  genuine  before  she  is  betrothed  .  .  . 

9079.  'Or  shall  have  gored  a  son  or  a  daughter' 
(ver.3i)=a  reviling  by  the  affection  of  evil  against  the 
truths  and  goods  of  faith  derived  from  interior  things  .  .  . 
'Son'=the  truth  of  faith  ;  and  'daughter,'  the  good  of 
faith  :  the  reason  they  =  truths  and  goods  derived  from 
interior  things,  is  that  interior  things  are  like  parents, 
from  which  goods  and  truths  are  born  like  sons  and 
daughters.  Ex. 

9666s.  'Sons  from  afar '= those  who  are  in  obscurity 
as  to  truths  ;  'daughters  from  the  extremity  of  the 
earth '= those  who  are  in  obscurity  as  to  goods,  such  as 
are  the  gentiles.  ' Sons '= those  who  are  in  truths,  and, 
in  the  abstract  sense,  truths;  'daughters,'  those  who 
are  in  goods,  and,  in  the  abstract  sense,  goods.  Refs. 

100312.  'The  daughter  of  My  people'  (Lam.ii.  11)  = 
the  Church. 

101094.  'The  daughter  of  a  priest  married  to  a 
strange  man  shall  not  eat'  (Lev.xxii.  I2)  =  that  the  holy 
things  of  the  Church  cannot  be  appropriated  to  the  good 
which  is  not  conjoined  with  the  truths  of  the  Church. 

1022714.  'The  daughter  of  Tyre  shall  offer  thee  a 
gift'  (Ps.xlv.  12):  the  Church  as  to  the  affection  of 
truth  is  here  described,  and  is  called  '  the  king's 
daughter  ;'  for  '  daughter '  =  the  Church  as  to  affection  ; 
and  'king,'  truth.     E.2365. 

10402.  'Pull  out  the  earrings  of  gold  from  the  ears 
of  your  women,  of  your  sons,  and  of  your  daughters' 
(Ex.xxxii.2)  =  the  drawing  out  of  such  things  from  the 
sense  of  the  letter  of  the  Word  as  favour  external  loves, 
and  the  principles  thence  derived.  .  .  '  Daughters '= the 
affections  of  truth  and  good,  and,  consequently,  in  the 
opposite  sense,  the  affections  of  falsity  and  of  evil. 

104904.  'The  daughter  against  her  mother,  and  the 
daughter-in-law  against  her  mother-in-law'  (Matt.x. 
35)  .  .  .  'The  daughter'=the  affection  of  good  and  of 
truth  ;  '  the  mother, '  the  affection  of  evil  and  of  falsity  ; 
'the  daughter-in-law '  =  the  truth  of  the  Church  adjoined 
to  its  good  ;  and  'the  mother-in-law,'  falsity  adjoined  to 
its  evil.     \ 

1065 1.  'If  thou  take  of  his  daughters  for  thy  sons' 
(Ex.xxiv. i6)  =  the  conjunction  of  the  affections  of  evil 


with  truths  .  .  .  '  Daughters  '=  the  affections  of  good  ; 
and,  in  the  opposite  sense,  the  affections  of  evil. 

10652.  'And  his  daughters  go  a  whoring  after  their 
gods,  and  make  thy  sons  go  a  whoring  after  their  gods' 
(id.  )  =  thus  the  profanation  of  good  and  of  truth  .  .  . 
'His  daughters,'  or  those  of  the  inhabitant  of  the  land, 
=  the  affections  of  evil.  Ex. 

H.  382  (r).  ' Daughters '  =  the  affections  of  good,  thus 
goods.   Refs. 

Life  792.  The  Israelitish  and  Jewish  Churches  are 
here  treated  of,  which  are  'the  daughters  of  one  mother' 
(Ezek.xxiii.2).     R.  1344.  E.1414.  5557. 

R.  1663.  'The  king's  daughter '= the  Church  as  to 
the  affection  of  truth. 

458'2.  'The  daughters  of  the  owl,'  etc.  (Is.xiii.2i)  = 
various  concupisceuces. 

543.  'A  daughter,'  in  the  Word,  =  the  good  of  doe- 
trine,  also  the  will  and  thence  the  affection  of  truth  ami 
of  good. 

748e.  '  To  eat  the  flesh  of  sons  and  daughters ' 
(Jer.xix.9)  =  to  destroy  truths  and  goods  with  one's 
self:   '  sons '  =  truths  ;  and  'daughters,' goods.  Refs. 

M.  120.  The  offspring  from  the  Lord  as  a  Husband 
and  Father,  and  from  the  Church  as  a  wife  and  mother, 
are  all  spiritual ;  and  in  the  spiritual  sense  of  the  Word 
are  meant  by  'sons  and  daughters,'  etc.  Gen. art. 

.  Hence   'sons   and  daughters'  in  the  spiritual 

sense  of  the  Word,  mean  truths  and  goods  ;  'sons,' 
truths  conceived  in  the  spiritual  man  and  born  in  the 
natural  man;  and  'daughters,'  in  like  manner,  goods 
...  As  '  daughters  '=  the  goods  of  the  Church,  there 
is  so  frequently  mentioned  in  the  Word  'the  daughter 
of  Zion,'  'of  Jerusalem,'  'of  Israel,'  and  'of  Judah,'  by 
which  are  not  meant  any  daughters,  but  the  affection 
of  good  which  is  of  the  Church. 

202.  The  offspring  born  from  two  who  are  in  love 
truly  conjugial  derive  from  their  parents  the  marriage 
principle  of  good  and  truth,  whereby  they  have  an 
inclination  and  capacity,  if  sons,  to  perceive  the  things 
of  wisdom,  and  if  daughters,  to  love  the  things  which 
wisdom  teaches.   Gen.  art. 


E.  1758.  'Sons  and  daughters'  (Jer.v.  17)  =  the  affec- 
tions of  truth  and  of  good. 

1959.  'The  king's  daughter' = the  spiritual  affection 
of  truth,  and  thence  the  Church  from  those  who  are  in 
that  affection.     242'-1.  29s7.  41226.  68418. 

2407.  '  The  daughters  of  Zion '  ( Is.  iii.  17)= the  Celestial 
Church,  and  the  things  of  that  Church  ;  here,  perverted. 

3572.  'Of  a  daughter'  (Gen.xlix.22)=those  who  are 
in  evils,  and  want  to  destroy  goods  by  means  of  falsities. 

35719.  'The  daughter  of  Zion'  (Jer.vi.23)=the  Church. 

3727.  'The  daughter  of  My  people'  (Jer.viii.2i)  =  the 
Church. 

395s.  ' The  king's  daughters  that  were  virgins '  (2  Sam. 
xiii.  i8)=the  affections  of  truth,  and  thence  the  Church, 
as  may  be  evident  from  a  thousand  places  in  the  Word 
where  are  mentioned  'the  daughter  of  a  king,'  'the 
daughter  of  Zion,'  and  'the  daughter  of  Jerusalem'  .  .  . 


Daughter 


19 


Daughter-in-law 


wherefore,  also,  the  daughters  of  a  king  represented  the 
truths  of  that  affection  by  their  garments,  and,  in  general, 
by  their  mantles,  which  were  variegated  with  pieces. 

40313.  'Which  devoureth  thy  sons  and  thy  daughters' 
(Jer.v.  1 7)  =  all  spiritual  affections  of  truth  and  of  good. 

4i22B.  'The  daughter  of  Tyre '  =  the  affection  of  the 
Knowledges  of  truth  and  of  good. 

438s.  'The  daughters  who  will  make  happy '= the 
spiritual  affections  of  truth  which  constitute  the  Church, 
and  from  which  comes  all  internal  happiness  that  is 
heavenly.  Ex. 

448s.  'Of  a  daughter,  she  marcheth  upon  the  wall' 
=  to  fight  from  the  truths  which  are  from  good  against 
the  falsities  which  are  from  evil. 

45310.  'The  daughters  of  Judah  which  shall  exult' 
(Ps.xlviii.  1  i)  =  the  affections  of  good  and  of  truth  which 
appertain  to  those  who  belong  to  the  Celestial  Church. 

50431.  'The  mother  against  the  daughter,  and  the 
daughter  against  the  mother '  (Luke  xii.  53) =the  cupidity 
of  falsity  against  the  affection  of  truth  ;  and  the  reverse. 
724s. 

518s.  'Dragons  and  the  daughters  of  the  owl'  (Is. 
xliii.  20)  =  those  who  know  truths  and  goods  only  from 
memory,  and  do  not  understand  and  perceive  them  ; 
these  speak  truth  without  having  any  idea  of  it,  being 
entirely  dependent  upon  others. 

52614.  'The  daughter  of  the  Chaldeans'  (Is.xlvii.5)  = 
the  falsification  of  truth. 

53211.  'The  mother'  (Luke  xii. 53)  =  the  truth  of  the 
Church  ;  and  'the  daughter,'  its  good. 

5557.  'The  sons  and  daughters  whom  they  bare' 
(Ezek.xxiii.4)  =  the  falsities  and  evils  of  the  Church. 

5864.  'To  sacrifice  sons  and  daughters'  (Ps.cvi.37)  = 
to  destroy  the  truths  and  goods  of  the  Church  by  evil 
cupidities;  ' sons '  =  the  truths  of  the  Church;  and 
'daughters,'  its  goods. 

58710.  'The  daughters  of  the  owl '  —  the  affections  of 
falsity. 

61730.  The  consumption  of  all  truth  and  good  is  sig- 
nified by  'they  shall  eat  the  flesh  of  their  sons  and 
daughters'  (Lev.xxvi.29).  'Sons'  =  the  truths  of  the 
Church,  and,  in  the  opposite  sense,  its  falsities  ;  and 
'  daughters '  —  the  affections  of  truth  and  of  good,  and, 
in  the  opposite  sense,  the  cupidities  of  falsity  and  of 
evil ;  their  mutual  consumption  and  extinction  is  signi- 
fied by  'eating  them.' 

62410.  'Thy  sons  and  thy  daughters  shall  fall  by  the 
sword'  (Amos  vii.  1 7)  =  that  the  truths  and  goods  of  the 
Church  will  perish  by  means  of  the  falsities  of  evil. 

63711.  'The  daughters  of  Zion,'  and  'the  virgins  of 
Jerusalem'  (Lam. ii.  10)  —  those  in  the  Church  who  are 
in  the  affection  of  good  and  of  truth  ;  and,  abstractedly, 
these  affections  themselves. 

65035.  'The  daughters  of  the  owl' =  sensuous  affec- 
tions, for  the  Sensual  is  affected  with  and  sees  truths 
in  the  darkness,  as  an  owl  sees  objects  in  the  night. 

6534.  'The  daughters  that  were  haughty'  (Ezek. 
xvi.5o)  =  the  cupidities  which  are  of  (self-love). 


654-".  'The  daughter  of  Egypt '  =  the  affection  of 
falsity  which  belongs  to  such  a  Church. 

^   'Sons    and    daughters'    (Ezek.xxiii.25)  =  the 

truths  and  goods  of  the  Church  which  they  will  de- 
stroy.      70. 

65 57.  'To  commit  whoredom  with  the  daughters  of 
Moab'  (Num. xxv. i)  =  to  adulterate  the  goods  of  the 
Church. 

65921.  'Sons  and  daughters'  (Jer.xvi.3)  =  exterior 
truths  and  goods  ;  'mothers  and  fathers,'  interior  truths 
and  goods  .  .  . 

687 u.  'The  daughter  of  the  Chaldeans '  =  the  pro- 
fanation of  truth. 

71418.  ' Owls' =  those  who  see  falsities  as  truths  ;  and 
'  their  daughters, '  the  concupiscences  of  falsifying  truths. 
20 

72411.  'Our  daughters'  (Ps.cxliv. I2)  =  the  affections 
of  truth  ;  which  are  therefore  compared  to  'corners  cut 
out  in  the  figure  of  a  palace, '  because  '  a  palace '  is  the 
representative  of  the  understanding,  in  which  truths  are 
in  their  beautiful  form,  and  they  are  in  a  beautiful 
form  when  they  are  from  the  affection  of  truth. 

72420.  'Sons  from  afar,  and  daughters  from  the  ex- 
tremity of  the  earth  : '  '  sons '  =  those  who  are  in  truths  ; 
and  'daughters,'  those  who  are  in  the  affection  of  them  ; 
and,  therefore,  abstractedly  from  persons,  they  =  truths 
and  the  affections  of  them. 

**,  That  all  truths  together  with  the  affections 

of  them  will  perish  through  falsities  is  signified  by  'your 
sons  and  your  daughters  shall  fall  by  the  sword'  (Ezek. 
xxiv.21):  ' sons '  —  truths  ;  'daughters,'  the  affections 
of  truth. 

7341S.  The  Church  which  is  in  genuine  truths  is 
meant  by  'the  daughter  of  Zion'  (Jer.vi.2). 

81 117.  'Thy  sons  are  carried  off  into  captivity,  and 
thy  daughters  into  captivity'  (Jer.xlviii.46)  =  that  the 
truths  and  goods  of  their  Church  are  shut  off  by  falsities 
and  evils;  'sons' =  truths  ;  and  'daughters,' goods. 

8633.  'The  daughter  of  Zion'  (Lam.ii.  io)  =  the  Church 
in  which  the  Lord  reigns  through  Divine  truth.      11 75-. 

13.  See  Virgin  at  this  ref. 

15.   'King's   daughters'  (Ps.xlv.)  =  the   affections 

of  Divine  truth  .  .  .  '  The  daughter  of  Tyre  shall  send  a 
gift'  =  worship  by  those  who  are  in  the  Knowledges  of 
truth  .  .  .  'The  king's  daughter  is  all  glorious  within' 
=  the  spiritual  affection  of  truth,  which  is  called 
'glorious'  from  the  abundance  of  truth,  and  'within' 
=  what  is  spiritual. 

91114.  'Harvest'  and  'bread'  (Jer.v.  1 7)= the  truths 
and  goods  of  the  Church  nourishing ;  '  sons  and 
daughters,'  the  same  producing. 

9193.  'Careless  daughters'  (Is.xxxii.9)=those  in  the 
Church  who  love  falsities  more  than  truths. 

922s.  'The  daughter  of  Judah'  (Lam. i.  15)  =  the 
Church  from  the  doctrine  of  truth  from  the  Word. 

Daughter-in-law.    Nurus. 

A.  246610.  See  Daughter  at  these  refs.    48432. 3. 

104904. 
48 1 82.  To  lie  with  a  daughter-in-law  was  a  capital 


David 


20 


David 


offence  (Lev.xx.  12),  and  Judah's  referring  this  deed  with 
his  daughter-in-law  to  the  levirate  law  .  .  .  involves 
this,  that  his  sons  by  Taniar  should  be  acknowledged  as 
the  sons  of  Er  his  first-born,  who  was  born  of  a  Canaanite 
mother  .  .  . 

[A.] 4843.  '(Judah  said)  to Tamar his daughter-indaw' 
(Gen.xxxviii.  n)  =  a  Church  representative  of  spiritual 
and  celestial  things,  which  is  called  'a  daughter-indaw' 
from  truth  ...  'A  daughter-in-law' =  the  Spiritual  of 
the  Church,  or  truth.  The  reason  'a  daughter-in-law' 
has  this  signification,  is  that  all  things  of  marriage,  and 
all  who  were  from  marriage,  represented  such  things  as 
are  of  the  heavenly  marriage,  thus  which  are  of  good 
and  truth  .  .  .  Hence,  'a  daughter-in-law,'  being  the 
wife  of  a  son  as  a  new  husband,  =  the  truth  of  the 
Church  conjoined  with  good.     9079. 

2.  That  by  'a  daughter-in-law,'  in  the  internal 

sense  of  the  "Word,  is  signified  the  truth  of  the  Church 
adjoined  to  its  good,  consequently,  in  the  opposite 
sense,  the  falsity  of  the  Church  adjoined  to  its  evil.    111. 

4869.  '  Because  he  knew  not  that  she  was  his  daughter- 
in-law'  (ver.  16)— that  he  did  not  perceive  it  to  be  the 
truth  of  the  Representative  Church.  'A  daughter-in- 
law' =  the  truth  of  the  Church  adjoined  to  its  good. 
The  reason  it = the  truth  of  the  Representative  Church, 
is  that  by  'Tamar,'  who  is  here  'the  daughter-in-law,' 
is  represented  the  Church  representative  of  spiritual  and 
celestial  things. 

4903.  'Saying,  Tamar  thy  daughter-in-law  hath 
committed  whoredom'  (ver. 24)  =  a  perception  that  it  is 
false  that  there  is  anything  conjugial  in  the  case  .  .  . 
'A  daughter-in-law '  =  the  truth  of  the  Church. 

H.  382a.  'Sons'and '  daughters '  =  the  truths  and  goods 
which  are  procreated  ;  'sons-in-law,'  and  'daughters-in- 
law,'  the  conjunctions  of  these. 

(r).   'A  daughter-in-law '  =  good  associated  with 

its  truth.  Ref. 


E.  14112.  'The  daughters-in-law  who  commit  adul- 
tery' (Hos.iv. I3)  =  evil  conjoined  with  falsities  thence. 
32420. 

De  Conj.  8^.  They  who  read  the  Word  without 
doctrine,  as  they  necessarily  fall  into  many  fallacies 
from  the  sense  of  the  letter  .  .  .  and  who  have  at  the 
same  time  taken  up  many  falsities  and  confirmed  them- 
selves in  them,  and  who  are,  consequently,  in  the  conceit 
of  their  Own  intelligence,  produce  adultery  as  of  a  father 
with  his  daughter-in-law. 

David.     David. 

A.  66°.  In  the  Psalms,  under  the  character  of  David 
as  a  king,  in  the  internal  sense,  it  treats  of  the  Lord. 

255e.   'David' (Ps.lxxxix.3)  =  the  Lord.     2842^  . 

6662.   'David'  (Is.lv. 3)  =  the  Lord. 

4.   'David' (Ezek.xxxiv. 24)  =  the  Lord.     10382. 

-. .   'David'  (Ezek.xxxvii.25)  =  the  Lord.     10383. 

102510.   'David'  (Jer.xxxiii.22)  =  the  Lord. 

.    'David'  (Jer.xxiii.5)=:the  Lord. 

17253.  This  is  evident  in  David.     17452. 

1888.  By  'David'  is  not  meant  David,  but  the  Lord. 
.  .  .  These  things  were  written   by  the   prophets   after 


the  time  of  David,  yet  it  is  openly  said  that  he  shall  be 
their  Prince  and  King. 

21593.  'David'  (Is.xxxvii.35)  =  the  Lord,  "Who,  as 
He  was  to  come,  is  called  'Servant'  as  to  the  Human. 

2604.  Many  of  the  Jews  are  there  introduced  to 
David,  etc. 

2649".  'How,  therefore,  doth  David  in  spirit  call  Him 
Lord?'  (Matt.xxii.43) :  thus  as  to  the  flesh  He  was  no 
longer  the  Son  of  David.     L.355.  T.  1022. 

27615.   'David'  (Jer.xvii.25)  =  the  Lord. 

2832s.   'David'  (Ps.cxxxii.  I7)=the  Lord.     995416. 

2842-1.  'David'  (ver. n)  =  the  Lord.  Still,  the  oath 
was  made  to  David,  because  he  was  of  such  a  character 
that  he  believed  it  to  be  confirmed  concerning  himself 
and  his  descendants,  for  David  was  in  the  love  of  himself 
and  his  descendants,  and  therefore  believed  that  (these 
things)  were  said  about  him  .  .  .  although  they  were 
said  about  the  Lord. 

29094.  See  Hebrox  at  this  ref. 

33053.  Hence  it  is  manifestly  evident,  that  by  'David,' 
etc.  are  not  meant  these  persons,  but  that,  in  the 
supreme  sense,  they = the  Divine  spiritual  things  which 
are  in  the  Lord,  and  which  are  of  the  Lord  in  His 
Kingdom  and  Church  .  .  .     38S14. 

33224.  'The  tent  of  David'  (Amos  ix.  n)=the  Church 
and  worship  of  the  Lord.     49263. 

344 14.  'David  My  servant'  (Ezek.xxxvii.24)  =  the 
Lord  as  to  the  Divine  Human,  and  this  from  Divine 
truth,  which  is  signified  by  'a  king,'  who  here  is  David. 

388 17.  Truth  is  signified  by  'the  house  of  David' 
(Zech.xii.7). 

439 14.  'To  set  up  the  fallen  tent  of  David'  (Ainos- 
ix.  11)  =  to  restore  the  Holy  of  truth  after  it  has  perished  ; 
'  David  '  =  the  Lord  relatively  to  Divine  truth. 

4594e.  See  Bethlehem  at  these  refs.     E.4493. 

.  By  'David'  is  especially  represented  the  Lord 

as  to  the  Royalty  or  Divine  truth.     53072. 

4763s.  By  'a  king,'  especially  by  'David,'  is  repre- 
sented Divine  truth. 

50448.  'The  throne  of  David' z=  the  Heaven  of  the 
Lord. 

53134.  'The  throne  of  David'  (Lukei.32)  is  not  the 
kingdom  David  had  .  .  .  but  the  kingdom  in  Heaven  ; 
wherefore  by  'David'  is  not  signified  David,  but  the 
Lord's  Divine  Royalty;  and  by  'throne,'  the  Divine 
truth  which  proceeds,  and  which  constitutes  the  Lord's 
Kingdom. 

5335e-  As  David  was  to  represent  the  Lord  as  to  the 
royalty,  he  did  not  begin  to  reign  (until  he  was  'a  son 
of  thirty  years')  (2Sam.v.4),  Ex. 

8495*.  <To  slt  UP011  the  throne  of  David'  (Jer.xvii.25) 
=  that  these  things  are  from  the  Lord. 

877oe.  They  who  know  the  things  mentioned  above 
may  also  know  why  somewhat  of  the  priesthood  was 
granted  to  David. 

9i63e.  'The  house  of  David,'  and  'the  tent  of  David' 
=  the  Church  of  the  Lord  ;  for,  in  the  prophetic  Word, 
'  David '  —  the  Lord. 


David 


21 


David 


954Se.  David  is  called  'the  lamp  of  Israel'  (2  Sam. 
xxi.  17)  .  .  .  because  'a  king' = the  Divine  truth  which 
is  from  the  Lord  ;  and  'David,'  the  Lord  as  to  Divine 
truth,  from  which  come  faith,  intelligence,  and  wisdom. 

995415.   'David'  (Ps.lxxxix.2o)  =  the  Lord. 

16.  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  the  Lord  as  to  His 

Divine  Human  is  here  (Ps.cxxxii.  10)  meant  by  'David,' 
'the  anointed  of  Jehovah.' 

1 021 73.  ' To  number'  —  to  arrange  in  order  and  dispose, 
and  as  it  belongs  to  the  Lord  alone  to  arrange  in  order 
and  dispose  the  truths  and  goods  of  faith  and  of  love 
with  everyone  in  the  Church  and  in  Heaven,  therefore, 
when  this  is  done  by  man,  as  it  was  done  by  David 
through  Joab,  it  =  the  ordering  and  disposition  of  such 
things  by  man  and  not  by  the  Lord  ;  which  is  not  to 
order  and  dispose,  but  to  destroy.     P.  244. 

102495.  By  'the  seed  of  David'  (Ps.lxxxviii.4)  is  not 
meant  the  posterity  from  David  as  a  father  .  .  .  but  by 
'David'  here,  as  elsewhere,  is  meant  the  Lord  as  to 
Divine  truth  ;  thus  by  his  'seed'  are  meant  those  who 
are  regenerated  by  the  Lord,  and,  in  the  abstract  sense, 
those  things  which  are  from  the  Lord  with  them  .  .  . 

H.  5264.  The  Angels  know  where  David,  etc.  are : 
they  are  held  in  no  higher  estimation  than  others.  The 
reason  they  are  mentioned  with  honour  in  the  Word,  is 
that  by  them  in  the  internal  sense  is  meant  the  Lord  .  ,  . 
by  'David'  the  Lord  as  to  the  Divine  Royalty. 

L.  43.  That  the  Lord  is  called  'David.'  111. 

44.  He  who  knows  that  the  Lord  is  meant  by  'David,' 
may  know  why  David  so  frequently  wrote  about  the 
Lord  in  his  Psalms  when  he  wrote  about  himself.   111. 

S.  71.   See  Aaron  at  this  ref. 

P.  245.  David  represented  the  Lord  Who  was  to  come 
into  the  world  ;  and  Solomon,  the  Lord  after  His 
coming.     e. 

R.  174.  'He  that  hath  the  key  of  David,  and  openeth 
and  no  one  shutteth,  and  shutteth  and  no  one  openeth' 
(Rev.  iii.  7)  =  Who  alone  has  omnipotence  to  save. 
' David'  =the  Lord  as  to  Divine  truth.  .  .  'The  key  of 
David'  has  a  similar  signification  to  the  keys  of  Peter. 
.  .  .  The  key  of  David  given  to  Eliakim  (Is.xxii.21, 22) 
has  also  a  similar  signification. 

266.  'Which  is  of  the  tribe  of  Judah,  the  root  of 
David'  (Rev. v. 5)  =  (that  the  Lord  subjugated  the  Hells) 
through  the  Divine  good  united  to  the  Divine  truth  in 
His  Human.  .  .  By  'David'  is  meant  the  Lord  as  to  the 
Divine  truth  of  the  Divine  wisdom. 

954.  'I  am  the  Root  and  the  offspring  of  David'  (Rev. 
xxii.i6)  =  that  He  is  that  Lord  Who  was  born  in  the 
world,  and  thus  the  Lord  in  His  Divine  Human.  From 
this  He  is  called  'the  Root  and  the  Offspring  of  David,' 
and  also  'the  Branch  of  David'  (Jer.xxiii.5;  xxxiii.  15). 

D.  463.  On  the  same  side,  lower  down,  is  David,  who 

receives  nobody  that  comes  to  him  ;  but  those  who  come 
he  sends  from  himself  to  Jesus  ;  thus  he  lives  in  heavenly 
rest,  and  in  happiness. 

2621.  On  David.  .  .  When  I  was  reading  about  the 
adultery  of  David  with  Bathsheba,  and  about  his 
cruelty  to  the  sons  of  Amnion,  there  was  long  presented, 


for  days,  one  whom  they  called  David,  with  whom  I 
spoke  ;  and  I  supposed  that  he  could  have  been  among 
the  upright ;  but  if  it  is  he,  or  if  the  one  who  is  with 
me  presents  his  person  .  .  .  then  is  he  such  a  leader  of 
adulterers  and  of  the  cruel  as  derive  from  adulteries  and 
cruelty  the  highest  delight ;  and,  moreover,  he  is  acute 
or  pernicious,  because  his  phantasy  goes  deeper  than 
others.  I  have  heard  that  during  his  life  by  what  he 
wrote  in  the  Psalms  he  meant  himself,  and  not  so  much 
the  Messiah,  Whom  he  indeed  knew  ;  but  whether  he 
believed  Him  to  be  Jehovah  the  God  of  Israel,  I  do  not 
yet  know.     See  2  Sam.  xii.  31.     2656. 

2638.  David  learned  (this  cruelty)  from  such  Spirits, 
or  from  his  companions  who  had  been  in  visions  .  .  . 

2640.  These  are  the  three  kinds  of  instruments  which 
the  infernals  seem  to  themselves  to  use  with  the  greatest 
delight,  whom  David  taught  when  he  was  in  his  cruelty  : 
hence  it  may  be  evident  of  what  quality  he  was  :  and  as 
to  his  Psalms,  he  did  not  speak  the  least  word,  but  the 
Lord's  spirit  through  him,  because  he  was  a  king,  and 
of  such  a  character  ;  but  he  had  applied  to  himself 
whatever  is  said  there  about  the  Messiah  and  His 
Kingdom. 

2657.  There  is  no  harm  in  their  calling  (David)  a 
man  of  God,  and  holy.  Ex. 

3346.  (The  delight  of  these  inhabitants  of  Venus  in 
plundering)  was  communicated  to  me  .  .  .  Hence  the 
cruelty  of  David. 

3656.  On  David  and  a  Pope.  It  was  shown  that 
David  desired  to  be  the  highest  in  Heaven,  for  such  a 
cupidity  cleaves  to  him  from  his  understanding  himself 
in  the  Psalms.  Sometimes  he  is  permitted  to  go  up  on 
high,  and  so  suppose  himself  to  be  in  the  highest 
Heaven.  Des. 

3657.  It  was  also  shown  how  he  subjugates  those  who 
are  in  the  interior  sphere  of  Spirits,  and  compels  them 
to  worship  him  as  a  god.  The  pope  who  was  lately  with 
me  again  came  among  those  who  are  above  the  head  .  .  . 
and  was  then  with  David,  who  wanted  to  reduce  him  to 
submission,  so  that  he  should  worship  him  as  a  god  ; 
for  David  had  previously  declared  that  he  was  a  god, 
when  he  was  in  the  highest,  and  it  was  seen  and  repre- 
sented .  .  .  that  those  who  would  not  acknowledge  him 
a  god  in  that  highest  he  threw  headlong  down.  Des.  It 
then  came  out  of  his  phantasy  that  he  might  carry  the 
Lord  down  to  the  Lower  Earth,  to  keep  Him  there. 
Such  is  his  character  when  he  goes  up  into  the  highest, 
and  declares  himself  to  be  a  god  :  and  as  the  popes  also 
declare  themselves  to  be  god  on  earth,  he  of  whom  I 
spoke  before  was  united  with  David.  But  as  the  pope 
was  in  the  persuasion  that  he  was  a  god,  and  David  also 
was  in  the  persuasion  that  he  was  a  god  .  .  .  they  strove 
together  ;  but  David  conquered,  because  he  was  not  only 
in  persuasion,  but  was  also  in  cruelty,  and  thus  in  the 
persuasion  of  subjugating  .  .  .  and  when  the  pope  refused 
to  yield,  David  heard  or  perceived  that  he  would  profess 
Christ  .  .  .  and  then,  being  in  the  persuasion  of  cruelty, 
he  treated  him  in  his  own  way,  as  he  had  treated  the 
gentiles  .  .  . 

3658.  When  the  pope  complained  of  these  torments, 
David  said  to  him  that  he  was  David,  and  that  he  kept 


David 


22 


David 


the  Lord  bound,  and  that  only  one  was  to  reign  in 
Heaven  .  .  .  On  hearing  this,  the  pope  said  that  David 
was  holy  ;  he  therefore  denied  the  Lord  and  followed 
David  .  .  .  but  when  he  came  into  the  pope's  persuasion, 
that  if  he  denied  the  Lord  whose  vicar  he  was,  he  would 
be  nobody  .  .  .  David  noticed  it,  for  in  that  state  he  can 
instantly  perceive  the  persuasions  of  another,  wherefore 
he  turned  him  into  a  cloud  ...  in  which  condition  he 
supposed  himself  to  be  nothing. 

[D.]  3659.  After  this,  as  David  wanted  to  be  a  god,  he 
betook  himself  among  the  interior  Spirits  .  .  .  and  sub- 
jugated them,  because  he  was  in  the  persuasion  that  he 
was  a  god,  and  could  subjugate  everybody  by  cruelty 
such  as  he  had  during  his  life,  wherefore  he  subjugated 
those  interior  Spirits  who  would  not  acknowledge  him 
as  a  god.  Des. 

3660.  When  he  supposed  that  he  had  thus  subjugated 
Heaven,  he  feared  to  go  further  .  .  .  where  the  interior 
good  Spirits  begin,  because  he  knew  from  former  experi- 
ence that  he  could  not  endure  their  sphere  ;  but  still  .  .  . 
he  rushed  thither  .  .  .  and  then  began  to  be  tortured, 
and  to  be  sensible  of  a  cadaverous  stench,  so  that  he 
could  no  longer  endure  it ;  if  he  advanced  further  it 
seemed  to  him  that  he  would  perish  ;  wherefore  he  was 
cast  down  thence  into  the  Lower  Earth.  It  was  per- 
ceived that  this  had  often  taken  place  before,  and  that 
he  had  been  thus  cast  down  as  soon  as  he  came  into  the 
sphere  of  angelic  Spirits.  I  perceive  from  this,  that  he 
dared  go  thither  while  he  was  in  the  persuasion  that  the 
Lord  was  bound  by  him  .  .  .  yet  from  his  suffering  so 
miserably  while  there,  he  called  the  Lord's  Heaven 
Hell,  because  when  he  came  there  he  came  into  direful 
torments,  because  into  a  sphere  contrary  to  adultery 
and  cruelty.  But  when  he  reached  the  Lower  Earth, 
he  was  suddenly  projected  upwards,  from  some  per- 
suasion .  .  . 

3664.  It  was  observed  that  above  those  to  whom 
David  strove  to  come,  there  are  Spirits  still  more  subtle, 
for  from  the  fact  that  Spirits  spoke  through  him  during 
the  life  of  the  body,  David  is  of  such  a  character  that 
he  is  able  to  strive  to  come  to  them.  (These  Spirits 
described. ) 

3665.  Such  Spirits,  and  David  too,  although  among 
the  evil  he  seems  so  acute  .  .  .  are  yet  grosser  than  all 
the  rest ;  for  in  the  sphere  of  the  good  they  become 
more  excrementitious,  nay,  more  cadaverous  than  others 
...  as  was  said  to  David,  and  thus  to  them. 

3674.  On  David.  I  spoke  to  David,  avIio  is  now 
above  the  head,  and  who,  when  there,  supposes  himself 
to  be  more  subtle  than  others,  because  the  Holy  Spirit 
spoke  through  him.  He  openly  confessed  that  he  did 
not  understand  what  he  wrote  ;  he  had  indeed  thought 
that  it  contained  some  secrets,  but  what,  he  knew  not ; 
also  that  he  knew  that  a  certain  one  was  to  come  into 
the  world,  but  had  no  further  knowledge  about  him. 
This  he  .  .  .  as  it  were  attested  ;  and  also  that  he  had 
applied  each  and  all  things  to  himself  and  the  Jews. 
He  said  that  as  a  Spirit  spoke  through  him  as  he  through 
me,  he  was  of  the  same  character  ;  but  it  was  permitted 
to  say  to  him  that  he  had  no  Knowledge  of  the  Lord, 
thus  no  Knowledges  of  faith,  and  therefore  did  not 
know   the   interior   things   of  the   Word,    and   so   had 


remained  solely  in  the  sense  of  the  letter,  which  was  a 
very  different  thing ;  and  that  Spirits  had  spoken 
through  him  things  which  he  did  not  perceive  ...  To 
this  he  could  make  no  reply  .  .  . 

3679.  It  was  said  of  (this  Spirit)  that  he  was  of  such 
a  quality  as  to  freely  suffer  the  persons  of  others  to  be 
induced  upon  him,  as  that  of  David,  and  thus  act  not 
only  their  persons,  but  also  their  shameful  deeds  ;  and 
it  was  said  that  he  became  such  from  the  actuality  not 
only  of  David,  but  of  any  other  one.  Such  Spirits, 
especially  when  they  suffer  infamous  persons  to  be 
induced  upon  them,  after  a  while  are  such  that  they  do 
not  know  otherwise  than  that  they  are  those  very 
persons,  and  thus  persuade  not  others  only  but  them- 
selves too  that  they  are  such. 

3682.  David,  being  himself  wicked,  and  the  subject 
of  the  wicked  .  .  .  for  he  has  nothing  but  adulteries  and 
cruelties  in  his  disposition,  strives  and  plots  without 
conscience.  It  was  evident  that  he  was  a  subject  of  the 
deceitful  above  the  head,  as  they  began  to  exert  their 
wickedness  more  openly  than  before,  in  order  that  the 
blame  might  be  laid  on  David ;  wherefore  David  was 
wrapped  up  in  the  veil  and  let  down  towards  the  lower 
regions,  but  by  means  of  the  persuasions  and  phantasies 
infused  into  him  by  the  diabolic  crew  on  high.  He 
struggled  for  an  hour,  with  indescribable  pertinacity. 
Phantasies  were  constantly  infused  into  him,  which  he 
received  with  his  persuasion,  and  thus  with  the  veil. 
With  a  diminution  of  the  veil,  or  without  the  veil,  he 
cast  himself  in  all  directions,  now  below,  now  midway, 
now  upwards  in  front,  now  close  above  the  head,  now 
behind  the  head  ;  which  was  only  a  phantasy  with  an 
obstinate  persuasion.     3688. 

3683.  After  a  while  he  attempted  to  act  the  python 
.  .  .  standing  on  my  head  .  .  .  Whether  this  pythonic 
practice  belonged  to  David  during  his  life,  it  is  not 
allowable  to  infer  from  this  .  .  . 

3684.  He  was  afterwards  told  that  he  is  like  a  dog, 
and  was  treated  by  others  as  if  he  were  a  dog,  because 
he  was  their  subject,  which  was  confirmed  by  the  deceit- 
ful above  the  head  .  .  .  But  as  this  was  contrary  to  his 
sphere  of  authority  ...  he  was  indignant,  and  was  thus 
wrapped  up  in  as  it  were  a  misty  veil  of  authority,  and 
let  down  .  .  .  They  who  spoke  thus  to  David  were  those 
who  most  greatly  boast  that  they  are  the  Holy  Spirit. 
36S8. 

3S51.  The  Spirits  above  the  head  formed  a  design  to 
destroy  me.  .  .  I  perceived  that  they  wanted  to  act  by 
means  of  innocent  persons,  under  whose  persons  they 
presented  those  whom  they  evoked.  They  evoked  David 
also,  who  appeared  before  me  in  his  own  face  and  body, 
furnished  with  his  instruments,  but  immersed  in  a  dark 
cloud. 

41 1 1.  Such  punishments  last  long,  for  years  and  ages, 
as  with  the  dragon,  with  David,  which  punishments  are 
attended  with  vastation,  yet  a  last  vastation  follows. 
Des. 

4462.  See  Siren  at  this  ref. 

5618.  See  Word  at  this  ref. 

D.  Min.  4603°.  It  was  said  that  many  of  the  saints 


David 


23 


David 


are  in  Hell,  being  pre-eminently  magicians,  and  there 
were  mentioned  Anthony,  Francis  Xavier,  David. 

E.  19.  ' David' = Divine  truth  in  the  Spiritual  King- 
dom, which  is  called  the  Lord's  Royalty,  wherefore,  in 
the  supreme  sense,  he  =  the  Lord  as  to  that  truth  and  as 
to  that  Kingdom  ;  on  which  account  it  is  said  of  David 
that  he  shall  come  and  reign  over  the  Sons  of  Israel 
(Ezek.xxxvii.24,25;  Hos.iii.5).     62s. 

205.  'He  that  hath  the  key  of  David'  (Rev.iii.7)  = 
Who  has  power  through  Divine  truth.  .  .  '  David  '  =  the 
Lord  as  to  Divine  truth.  The  reason  'David'  in  the 
Word  means  the  Lord,  is  that  'kings'  in  the  Word 
represent  the  Lord  as  to  Divine  truth  .  .  .  and  king  David 
especially,  because  he  took  great  care  of  the  things  of 
the  Church,  and  also  wrote  the  Psalms  .  .  .  The  reason 
it  is  said  'he  that  hath  the  key  of  David,'  is  that 
'David'  represented  the  Lord  as  to  Divine  truth,  and 
all  power  in  the  Heavens  and  on  earth  resides  with  the 
Lord  from  Divine  good  through  Divine  truth  .  .  . 

2.  That  'David'  in  the  Word = the  Lord.  111. 

.   It  is  said  that  'they  shall  seek  Jehovah  their 

God,  and  David  their  king'  (Hos.iii.5),  because  'Jehovah' 
=  the  Lord  as  to  Divine  good,  which  is  the  Divine  being  ; 
and  'David  the  king,'  the  Lord  as  to  Divine  truth,  which 
is  the  Divine  manifesting. 

3.   'The  house  of  David,  and  the  inhabitant  of 

Jerusalem'  (Zech.xii. 7)  =  the  Spiritual  Kingdom,  which 
is  constituted  of  those  in  Heaven  and  earth  who  are  in 
Divine  truth.     48311. 

4.   'I  have  sworn  to  David  My  servant,  Thy  seed 

will  I  establish  for  ever  ;  and  build  up  thy  throne  to 
all  generations'  (Ps.lxxxix.4)  is  not  applicable  to  David, 
whose  seed  and  throne  have  not  been  established  for- 
ever .  .  .  but  '  the  seed  of  David '  means  those  who  from 
the  Lord  are  in  truths  from  good,  and,  in  the  abstract 
sense,  the  truths  themselves  which  are  from  good.  .  . 
That  it  is  the  Lord  as  to  Divine  truth,  or  that  it  is  the 
Divine  truth  proceeding  from  the  Lord,  which  is  meant 
by  'David,'  is  evident,  for  it  is  said,  'In  the  heavens 
thou  shalt  confirm  thy  truth,  and  the  heavens  shall 
confess  thy  truth  in  the  congregation  of  the  saints. ' 

G.  As  David  represented  the  Lord  as  to  Divine 

truth,  the  Lord  willed  to  be  born  from  the  house  of 
David,  and  also  to  be  called  'the  Son,'  'the  Root,'  and 
'the  Offspring  of  David'  .  .  .  but  when  the  Lord  put  off 
the  human  from  the  mother,  and  put  on  the  Human 
from  the  Father  .  .  .  He  was  no  longer  that  'Son,'  as 
is  meant  by  His  words  to  the  Pharisees  (Matt.xxii). 

253s.  'The  throne  of  David '  =  Heaven  as  to  Divine 
truth. 

310.  'Of  the  tribe  of  Judah,  the  root  of  David '  = 
through  Divine  good  united  to  Divine  truth  in  His 
Human  .  .  .  'The  root  of  David '  =  the  Divine  truth  ;  for 
'  David '  =  the  Lord  as  to  Divine  truth. 

e.  The  Lord  as  to  Divine  truth  is  called   'the 

root  of  David'  from  the  fact  that  all  Divine  truth  is 
from  Him,  as  also  all  things  come  forth  and  subsist 
from  their  root. 

3168.  'David'  (Ps.lxxxix.2o)  =  the  Lord  as  to  Divine 
truth  ...  As  'David'  means  the  Lord  as  to  the  Divine 
truth  which  proceeds  from  His  Divine  Human,  it  is 


said  'David  My  servant,'  for  'servant'  ...  is  predicated 
of  truth.     37520. 

9.   'David'  here,  too  (Ps.cxxxii.  i7)  =  the  Lord  as 

to  Divine  truth  ;  'to  make  his  horn  to  bud '  =  the  multi 
plication  of  Divine  truth  in  the  Heavens  and  on  earth 
by  Him  ;  wherefore  it  is  also  said  '  I  will  dispose  a  lamp 
for  Mine  anointed. ' 

37S20.  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  the  Lord  as  to  His 
Divine  Human  is  here  meant  by  'David  the  anointed 
of  Jehovah '  (Ps.  cxxxii.  17). 

376s4.  'The  kings  that  sit  upon  David's  throne'  (Jer. 
xiii.  1 3)  =  those  who  would  otherwise  be  in  Divine  truths. 

39212.  These  things  are  said  of  David  (Ps.cxxxii.  11), 
but  'David,'  here,  means  the  Lord. 

40 18.  These  things  are  said  of  the  Lord,  and  of  Heaven 
and  His  Church,  for  by  'David'  (Ps.lxxxix.25),  wno 
is  here  treated  of  in  the  sense  of  the  letter,  is  meant 
the  Lord. 

4095.  As  by  'David'  in  the  Word  is  meant  the  Lord 
as  to  Divine  truth,  and  Divine  truth  serves,  where 
'David'  means  the  Lord,  he  is  called  'a  servant.'  111. 

4446.  'There  shall  not  be  cut  off  from  David  a  man 
to  sit  upon  the  throne  of  the  house  of  Israel'  (Jer. 
xxxiii.  1 7)  =  that  then  the  Divine  truth  which  proceeds 
from  the  Lord  shall  perpetually  reign  in  the  Church.  .  . 
'  Then  may  also  My  covenant  become  of  no  effect  with 
David  My  servant,  that  he  should  not  have  a  son  to 
reign'  (ver.2i)  =  that  then  they  would  have  no  Divine 
truth  ...  'So  will  I  multiply  the  seed  of  David  My 
servant'  (ver.22)  =  the  multiplication  of  Divine  truth  .  .  . 
with  those  who  have  conjunction  with  the  Lord. 

45312.  'The  house  of  David '  =  the  Church  as  to  the 
truths  of  doctrine. 

55510.   'David'  (Zech.xii.i2)  =  the  Divine  truth. 

65051.  '  A  shepherd,  My  servant  David,  whom  Jehovah 
will  stir  up'  (Ezek.xxxiv.23,24)  means  the  Lord  .  .  . 

68410.  By  'David'  in  the  Word  is  meant  the  Lord  as 
to  Divine  truth,  or  as  a  King. 

19.  That  by   'David'   here   (Ps.lxxxviii)   is   not 

meant  David,  but  the  Lord  as  to  His  Royalty,  which 
is  the  Divine  Spiritual,  and  is  called  Divine  truth,  is 
very  evident  from  the  things  here  said  about  David  .  .  . 

29.    'David'  as   'a  servant'  =  the  Lord's   Human 

as  to  Divine  truth  ;  and  '  anointed '  —  this  united  to 
Divine  good.  .  .  '  In  Zion  I  will  make  the  horn  of  David 
to  bud'  (Ps.cxxxii.  1 7)  =  the  power  of  Divine  truth  from 
Him  in  Heaven  and  the  Church. 

70026.  Zion,  where  David  was  =  the  inmost  of  the 
Church,  which  is  called  its  Celestial. 

28.  David's  dancing  (2  Sam.  vi.  14)  represented  the 

gladness  and  joy  which  result  from  the  affection  of  truth 
and  good  from  the  Lord  through  the  influx  of  Divine 
truth,  which  is  signified  by  the  ark.  .  .  The  dancing  of 
David  .  .  .  represented  joy  of  heart  from  the  affection 
of  spiritual  and  celestial  good. 

7017.  By  'David' here  (Ps.lxxxix.3,28)  is  meant  the 
Lord  as  to  the  Royalty,  Who  is  called  '  chosen'  from  good, 
and  'servant'  from  truth  ;  'to  make  a  covenant,  and  to 
swear  to  him '  =  the  unition  of  His  Divine  with  His 
Human  .  .  .  '  I  will  establish  thy  seed  even  to  eternity' 


Davus 


24 


Dawn 


=  the  eternity  of  the  Divine  truth  from  Hirn  ;  'mercy 
will  I  keep  for  him  to  eternity '  =  the  eternity  of  the 
Divine  good  from  Him  .  .  .  This  is  the  sense  of  these 
words,  when,  instead  of  David,  there  is  understood  the 
Lord  as  to  His  Divine  Human  and  His  Royalty  .  .  . 

[E.  701  ]18.  By  '  David  who  shall  pasture  them,  and  who 
shall  be  a  prince  in  the  midst  of  them'  (Ezek.xxxiv.23) 
is  meant  the  Lord  as  to  Divine  truth,  which  is  called 
'a  servant'  from  its  serving. 

19.   'My  servant  David  shall  be  king  over  them' 

(Ezek.xxxvii. 24) :  here,  also,  by  'David'  is  meant  the 
Lord  ;  for  it  is  evident  that  it  was  not  David  who  was 
to  come  and  be  their  king  and  shepherd  .  .  . 

76818.  That  this  (infernal  falsity)  shall  not  have 
dominion  in  the  Lord's  Church,  in  which  there  is 
Divine  truth  celestial,  is  signified  by  'not  anyone  of 
his  seed  shall  sit  upon  the  throne  of  David,  and  have 
dominion  any  longer  in  Judah '  ( Jer.  xxii.  30). 

78112.  The  reason  power  was  given  to  David  to  smite 
a  lion  and  a  bear,  which  took  a  small  cattle  from  the 
flock  (1  Sam.xvii.34),  was  that  by  'David'  was  repre- 
sented the  Lord  as  to  Divine  truth,  by  means  of  which 
they  who  belong  to  His  Church  are  instructed.  .  .  'A 
lion'  here  =  the  power  of  infernal  falsity  against  Divine 
truth  .  .  .  and  'a  bear,'  the  power  of  falsity  against 
Divine  truth  natural ;  'a  small  cattle  from  the  flock '  — 
those  who  are  of  the  Lord's  Church  ;  and  as  these  things 
are  represented,  power  was  given  to  David  to  smite  the 
bear  and  the  lion,  by  which  was  represented  and  signified 
the  Lord's  power  of  protecting  His  own  in  the  Church 
by  means  of  His  Divine  truth  from  the  falsities  of  evil 
which  are  from  Hell.  .  .  By  'Goliah,'  who  was  a 
Philistine  .  .  .  are  signified  those  who  are  in  truths 
without  good.  .  .  and  'uncircumcised'  =  those  who  are 
in  filthy  corporeal  loves  .  .  .  Hence  it  is  evident  what 
the  victory  of  David  over  Goliah  represented. 

7999.  That  the  Lord  will  reign  (in  Heaven  and  the 
Church)  through  Divine  truth  from  Divine  good,  is 
signified  by  'he  shall  sit  thereon  in  truth  in  the 
tabernacle  of  David'  (Is.xvi.5);  by  'David'  is  meant 
the  Lord  as  to  the  Royalty,  which  is  Divine  truth  ;  and 
by  'his  tabernacle'  is  signified  Divine  good. 

8502.  The  reason  'Mount  Zion'  =  Heaven  and  the 
Church  where  the  Lord  reigns  through  His  Divine  truth, 
is  from  the  fact  that  Zion  was  the  city  which  David 
built,  and  in  which  he  afterwards  dwelt,  and  was  thence 
called  the  city  of  David  ;  and  as  by  'David'  was  repre- 
sented the  Lord  as  to  the  Royaltjr,  which  is  Divine  truth, 
'  Zion '  =  Heaven  and  the  Church  where  the  Lord  reigns 
through  Divine  truth. 

946.  The  Lord's  Spiritual  Kingdom  is  signified  by  the 
'throne  of  David'  (Is.ix.7). 

DaVUS.      Davus.     001-0.540. 

Dawn.     Aurora. 

A.  920.  When  (the  most  ancient  people)  perceived 
the  morning  they  did  not  perceive  the  actual  morning 
of  the  day,  but  the  heavenly  principle  which  is  an 
image  of  the  morning  and  the  dawn  in  minds  ;  hence 
the  Lord  is  called  'the  morning,'  'the  east,'  and  'the 
Day-spring.' 


1726.  In  a  state  of  peace,  the  celestial  and  spiritual 
things  of  the  Lord  are  as  in  their  dawn  and  spring,  for 
peace  is  as  the  dawn  in  early  morning,  and  as  the  spring 
in  spring-time  ;  dawn  and  spring  cause  everything  .  .  . 
to  be  full  of  joy  and  gladness  ;  each  thing  derives 
an  affection  from  the  general  nature  of  dawn  and 
spring ...     2780. 

18072.  When  he  sees  the  dawn  of  day,  he  does  not 
think  about  the  dawn,  but  about  the  origin  of  all 
things  frem  the  Lord,  and  their  advance  into  the  day 
of  wisdom. 

1837.  The  Lord's  Church  is  compared  to  the  times 
of  the  day  ;  its  first  period  to  sun-rise,  or  to  dawn  and 
morning  .  .  .     2905. 

2405.  'As  the  dawn  ascended'  (Gen. xix.  15)  =  when 
the  Lord's  Kingdom  draws  nigh  .  .  .  Daybreak  is  here 
expressed  by  '  as  the  dawn  ascended, '  and  it  =  the  time 
when  the  upright  are  separated  from  the  evil  .  .  .  This 
time  or  state  is  called  '  the  dawn, '  because  then  the  Lord 
comes,  or,  what  is  the  same,  His  Kingdom  then  draws 
nigh.  Such  is  really  the  case  with  the  good,  for  there 
then  beams  forth  with  them  an  appearance  of  morning 
daybreak  or  dawn ;  hence,  in  the  Word,  the  Lord's 
Advent  is  compared  to  'the  morning'  ...  as  in  Hosea  : 
'as  the  dawn  is  His  going  forth'  (vi.3)  .  .  .  His  Advent, 
or  drawing  nigh,  is  here  compared  to  'the  dawn.'    2441. 

3.   'The  day  of  Jehovah  conieth  ...  as  the  dawn 

spread  upon  the  mountains'  (Joel  ii.  1,2) :  here,  also,  it 
treats  of  the  Lord's  Advent,  and  His  Kingdom. 

4.   'From  the  womb  from  the  dawn'  (Ps.cx.3)  = 

the  Lord  Himself,  thus  the  Divine  love  from  which 
He  fought. 

H.   In  like  manner,  the  fire  upon  the  altar  was  to 

be  kindled  'every  dawn'  (Lev. vi. 9, 12). 

3458.  In  the  supreme  sense,  'morning'  and  'dawn':= 
the  Lord  ;  in  the  internal  sense,  the  Celestial  of  His 
love  ;  hence  also,  a  state  of  peace. 

35794.  By  the  morning  or  dawn,  when  the  dew  de- 
scends, are  signified  states  of  innocence  and  peace. 

36962.  After  combats  or  temptations,  man  comes  into 
this  state  (of  peace),  which  is  as  the  state  of  spring  that 
follows  autumn  and  winter,  or  as  the  state  of  dawn  that 
follows  evening  and  night :  a  state  of  peace  in  spiritual 
things  is  like  one  of  spring  and  dawn  in  natural  ones. 

4275.  'Until  the  ascending  of  the  dawn'  (Gen.xxxii.24) 
=  before  the  conjunction  of  the  natural  good  which  is 
signified  by  Jacob  with  the  Celestial  Spiritual  or  the 
Divine  good  of  truth.  In  the  supreme  sense,  'the 
dawn '  =  the  Lord;  in  the  representative  sense,  His 
Kingdom  ;  and  in  the  universal  sense,  the  Celestial  of 
love  ;  here,  the  Celestial  Spiritual  ;  for,  when  the  dawn 
ascended,  Jacob  was  named  Israel,  by  which  is  signified 
the  celestial  spiritual  man. 

4283.  '  He  said,  Let  me  go,  because  the  dawn  ascendeth ' 
(ver.26)  =  that  temptation  ceased  when  conjunction  was 
at  hand.  .  .  ' The  dawn'  =  the  conjunction  of  the  natural 
good  which  is  signified  by  Jacob  with  the  Celestial 
Spiritual  or  the  Divine  good  of  truth.  The  reason  the 
wrestling  commenced  before  the  dawn  ascended,  and 
ceased  after  it  had  ascended  ...  is  that  the  times  of 
the  day  .  .  .  signified  states  ;  here,  states  of  conjunction 


Dawn 


25 


Day 


through  temptations,  for  when  there  takes  place  the 
conjunction  of  the  internal  man  with  the  external,  it 
is  then  dawn  to  him,  because  he  then  enters  into  a 
spiritual  or  celestial  state  ;  and  then,  too,  if  he  is  in 
such  a  state  that  he  can  perceive  it  there  appears  to 
him  a  light  like  that  of  the  dawn :  otherwise,  his 
Intellectual  is  illuminated,  and  becomes  to  him  as 
when  one  awakes  from  sleep  in  the  early  morning  while 
the  dawn  is  first  enlightening  and  beginning  the  day. 

4289.  'Let  me  go,  because  the  dawn  ascendeth'  (id. )  = 
that  the  representative  would  depart  from  the  descendants 
of  Jacob  before  they  came  into  the  representatives  of  the 
Land  of  Canaan  .  .  .  ' Dawn  '  =  when  they  came  into  the 
Land  of  Canaan,  thus  into  the  representative  of  a  Church 
there.  Ex. 

4300.  'The  dawn  ascendeth '  =  when  conjunction  is  at 
hand,  or  is  commencing. 

56622.  Peace  in  Heaven  is  like  spring  on  earth,  or 
like  the  dawn,  which  do  not  affect  by  means  of  sensible 
varieties,  but  by  means  of  a  universal  pleasantness  flow- 
ing into  each  thing  that  is  perceived,  and  which  imbues 
with  pleasantness  not  only  the  perception  itself,  but 
every  single  object.     8455. 

H.  289.  This  peace  is  like  the  morning  or  dawn  in 
spring  time  :  the  night  is  past ;  all  things  of  Earth  live 
anew  at  the  rising  of  the  sun  ;  the  scent  of  vegetation  is 
diffused  by  the  descending  dew  of  the  skies  ;  and  the 
soft  breath  of  spring  gives  fertility  to  the  soil,  and  fills 
all  minds  with  pleasantness.  The  reason  is  that  the 
morning  or  dawn  in  the  spring  time  corresponds  to  the 
state  of  peace  of  the  Angels  in  Heaven. 

P.  257s.  'How  art  thou  fallen  from  heaven,  Lucifer, 
son  of  the  dawn'  (Is.xiv.  12)  .  .  .  It  is  from  this  primeval 
state  of  (the  first  preachers  of  the  Christian  Church)  that 
Lucifer  is  called  '  the  son  of  the  dawn. ' 

M.  382.  From  the  transparence  of  which  comes  the 
dawn  and  bloom  of  her  life. 

T.  112.  I  fell  into  meditation  respecting  the  fables  of 
the  ancients,  that  they  feigned  Aurora  with  wings  of 
silver  feathers,  and  in  her  face  displaying  the  lustre 
of  gold. 

5 7 12.  These  two  states  (that  is,  reformation  and  re- 
generation) may  be  compared  to  the  progression  of  light 
and  heat  in  the  days  of  the  spring  time ;  the  first  to 
daybreak-cZ^Mcrtfo-or  cock-crowing,  the  second  to  the 
morning  and  dawn. 


D.  2294.  This  is  the  reason  why  the  states  of  Spirits 
are  varied,  so  that  there  may  be  compared  to  them  the 
changes  ...  of  the  day  ;  dawn,  noon,  evening,  night ; 
and  again  dawn. 

E.  102912.  Lucifer  is  called  'the  son  of  the  dawn' 
from  the  initiament  of  the  light  or  of  day  ;  for  '  the 
dawn '  =  the  Church  at  its  beginning. 

Dawn.     See  Daybreak. 

Dawn.     Illucescere. 

A.  20412.  Celestial  love  .  .  .  begins  to  appear,  nay,  to 
dawn  in  his  interior  man. 

5740.  'The  morning  dawned'  (Gen.xliv.3)  =  a  state  of 
enlightenment. 


Day.     Dies. 

See  Sabbath,  Today,  and  Tomorrow  ;  and  also 
under  Time  and  Three. 

A.  6.  The  six  days  or  times,  which  are  so  many  suc- 
cessive states  of  man's  regeneration,  are  in  general  as 
follows.     62. 

16.  The  most  ancient  time  ...  is  called  in  the  Prophets 
'the  days  of  antiquity, '  and  also  'the  days  of  eternity.' 

21.  All  things  of  the  Lord  are  compared  to  'day,' 
because  they  belong  to  the  light ;  and  all  things  proper 
to  man  are  compared  to  'night,'  because  they  belong 
to  darkness. 

23.  Nothing  is  more  common  in  the  Word  than  for 
'day'  to  be  taken  for  time  itself.  111. 

.  As  'day'  is  taken   for  time,  it  is  also  taken 

for  the  state  of  that  time.  111. 

24.  After  the  spirit  of  God  .  .  .  has  brought  forth 
into  day  the  Knowledges  of  truth  and  good  .  .  . 

28.  Concerning  the  man  who  is  to  be  regenerated, 
in  Zechariah :  'That  shall  be  one  day  known  to  Jehovah ; 
not  day,  nor  night ;  at  the  time  of  evening  there  shall 
be  light'  (xiv.7). 

30.  Love  is  the  great  luminary  which  has  dominion 
'by  day'  (Gen.i.  16) ;  faith  from  love  is  the  lesser  luminary 
which  has  dominion  'by  night.'     32.    709. 

34e.  '  The  days  of  affliction'  (Mark  xiii.  19)  =  his  miser- 
able state  in  the  other  life. 

37.  It  is  said  that  the  luminaries  shall  be  'for  signs, 
and  for  stated  times,  and  for  days,  and  for  years'  (Gen. 
i.  14)  .  .  .  There  are  changes  of  spiritual  and  celestial 
things,  in  the  universal,  and  in  the  singulars,  which  are 
compared  to  the  changes  of  the  days  and  the  years  :  the 
changes  of  the  days  are  from  morning  to  noon,  thence 
to  evening,  and  through  night  to  morning.  (See 
Change-otcw.  ) 

38.  'To  have  dominion  in  the  day,  and  in  the  night' 
(ver.  18):  'day'  means  good;  'night,'  evil;  wherefore 
goods  are  called  works  of  the  day,  and  evils,  works  of 
the  night. 

7oe.  There  scarcely  intervene  days  after  the  decease 
of  the  body  before  they  are  in  the  other  life. 

74.  The  celestial  man  is  'the  seventh  day,  in  which 
the  Lord  rests.' 

221.  'The  aura  or  breath  of  the  day'  (Gen.iii.8)=the 
time  when  the  Church  still  had  a  residue  of  perception 
.  .  .  The  most  ancient  people  compared  the  states  of  the 
Church  to  the  times  of  the  day  and  night ;  to  the  times 
of  the  day  while  it  was  still  in  light  .  .  .  The  Lord  also 
calls  a  state  of  faith  'day,'  and  a  state  of  no  faith 
'night' ;  as  in  John  :  'I  must  work  the  works  of  Him 
that  sent  Me  while  it  is  day ;  the  night  cometh,  when 
no  one  can  work '  (ix.  4).  The  states  of  man's  regeneration 
are  also  called  'days'  in  Gen.i. 

267e.  'All  the  days  of  thy  life'  (Gen.iii.i7)  =  even  to 
the  end  of  that  Church.     271. 

347.  'The  end  of  the  days'  (Gen.iv.3)  =  the  advance  of 
time. 

3492.   'The  days   of  eternity'   (Mal.iii.4)  =  the  Most 


Day 


26 


Day 


Ancient  Church;  'the  ancient  years '  =  the  Ancient 
Church.     29066. 

[A.  ]  487.  '  Days '  (Gen.  v.  4)  =  times  and  states  in  general. 
It  is  very  common  in  the  Word  to  call  all  time  'days  ; ' 
wherefore,  also,  the  states  of  times  in  general  are  also 
signified  by  'days  ; '  and  when  'years'  are  added,  by  the 
times  of  the  years  are  signified  the  quality  of  the  states, 
thus  states  in  special. 

4S8.  ' Days'  =  states  in  general ;  and  'years,'  states  in 
special.   111. 

3.   In  the  sense  of  the  letter  it  cannot  but  seem 

that  '  day  '  =  time;  but  in  the  internal  sense  it  =  state: 
the  Angels  who  are  in  the  internal  sense  of  the  Word, 
do  not  know  what  time  is  .  .  .  thus  not  what  a  day  and 
a  year  are  ;  but  they  know  what  states  are,  and  their 
changes.  Examp.     493. 

862.  'It  came  to  pass  at  the  end  of  forty  days'  (Gen. 
viii.6)  =  the  duration  of  the  former  state,  and  the  begin- 
ning of  the  following  one.  .  .  As  the  state  after  temptations 
is  here  treated  of,  it  is  said  'forty  days,'  but  not  'forty 
nights  ; '  the  reason  is  that  charity  now  begins  to  appear, 
which  in  the  Word  is  compared  to  day,  and  is  called 
'  day  ; '  and  the  faith  which  precedes,  being  not  yet  so 
closely  conjoined  with  charity,  is  compared  to  night, 
and  is  called  '  night. ' 

893'-.  Every  entire  period  is  marked  out  in  the  Word 
by  a  day,  a  week,  a  month,  or  a  year,  even  if  it  were  a 
hundred  or  a  thousand  years  ;  as  'the  days'  mentioned 
in  Gen.i,  by  which  are  signified  the  periods  of  the  re- 
generation of  the  man  of  the  Most  Ancient  Church.  In 
the  internal  sense  'a  day'  and  'a  year'  have  no  other 
signification  than  time,  and  as  they  —  time,  they  =  state. 
111.     9037. 

931.  'Still  in  all  the  days  of  the  earth'  (Gen.viii.22)  = 
all  time  ;  for  'a  day '=  time  .  .  . 

936.  'Day  and  night'  (id.)  =  the  state  of  a  regenerate 
man  as  to  intellectual  things,  the  alternations  of  which 
are  those  of  day  and  night.  Ex. 

1259".  The  Most  Ancient  Church  and  the  Ancient 
Churches  are  'the  days  of  eternity,'  and  'the  years  of 
generation  and  generation'  (Deut.xxxii.7). 

1335-  'A  year'  in  the  Word,  as  'a  day,'  and  'a  week' 
=  a  whole  period,  less  or  greater,  of  fewer  or  of  more 
years  ;  nay,  abstractedly,  a  period. 

18072.  See  Dawn  at  these  refs.     1837.  2294. 

1S25.  The  last  time  of  the  Church  is  therefore  signified 
by  'the  third  day,'  'the  third  week,'  etc. 

18395.  'The  day  of  Jehovah'  (Zeph.i.i4)  =  the  last 
time  and  state  of  the  Church,      i8603,  111. 

2103.  'In  the  selfsame  day'  (Gen.xvii.23)  =  that  state 
which  has  been  spoken  of.  'Day,'  in  the  internal  sense, 
=  state. 

21 1 1.  'In  the  selfsame  day'  (ver.26)  =  then.  'Day' 
=  time  and  state.  Refs. 

21 19.  As  soon  'as  his  bodily  things  grow  cold,  which 
takes  place  after  some  days,  he  is  resuscitated  by  the 
Lord  .  .  . 

2199.  'Entering  into  days'  (Gen.xviii.  u)  =  that  the 
time  was  at  hand.     'A  day '  in  the  Word,  as  also  'a  year, 


nay,  in  general,  time,  =  state  ;  therefore,  here,  'to  enter 
into  days' =  to  enter  into  that  state  in  which  He  would 
put  off  the  human  ;  thus,  that  the  time  was  at  hand. 

2323.  The  states  of  the  Church  '  are  in  the  Word 
compared  to  the  times  of  the  year,  and  to  the  times  of 
the  day  .  .  .  namely,  its  noon,  evening,  night,  and 
morning  .  .  . 

23534-  'I  must  work  the  works  of  Him  that  sent  Me 
while  it  is  day'  .  .  .  'Day'  =  the  time  and  state  when 
there  are  good  and  truth  ;  'night,'  when  there  are  evil 
and  falsity. 

24052.  'The  third  day'  (Hos.vi.2)  =  the  judgment,  or 
the  Advent  of  the  Lord  ;  thus  the  drawing  nigh  of  His 
Kingdom.     278s2.  3,IU. 

2649.  'In  the  day  when  he  weaned  Isaac'  (Gen.xxi.S) 
=  a  state  of  separation.      'Day'  —  state. 

2726.   '  Days' =  the  state  of  the  thing  treated  of. 

2788.  'In  the  third  day'  (Gen.xxii.4)=what  is  com- 
plete, and  the  beginning  of  sauctification.  '  Day '  in 
the  Word  =  state. 

29065.  'Seventy  years'  (Is.xxiii.  15)  =  an  entire  period, 
from  the  beginning  of  the  Church's  existence  until  it 
expires,  which  also  is  'the  days  of  one  king.' 

ti.   'The  days  of  old'  and  'the  years  of  the  ages' 

(Ps.lxxvii.5)  =  (the  Most  Ancient  and  the  Ancient) 
Churches. 

3016.  'Abraham  being  old  came  to  days'  (Gen.xxiv.i) 
=when  the  state  was  at  hand  that  the  Lord's  Human 
should  become  Divine.  .  .  'Day' =  state.  Refs. 

3176.  'A  day  or  ten,  afterwards  thou  shalt  go'  (Gen. 
xxiv.55)  =  a  state  of  departure  which  appears  to  them 
full.     '  Day '  =  state. 

3251.  'These  are  the  days  of  the  years  of  the  lives  of 
Abraham  which  he  lived'  (Gen.xxv.7)=the  representa- 
tive state  of  the  Lord  as  to  the  essential  Divine  .  .  . 
'Days'  and  'years'  — states. 

3298.  'Her  days  were  fulfilled  to  bring  forth  (ver.24) 
the  first  state  of  effect.     '  Days '  = states. 

3325s.  The  reason  it  should  be  seven  days  with  its 
mother  (Ex. xxii. 30),  was  that  'the  seventh  day'  signi- 
fied the  celestial  man  ;  and  the  reason  why  on  the 
eighth  day  it  was  to  be  given  to  Jehovah,  was  that  'the 
eighth  day'  =  what  is  continuous  from  a  new  beginning  ; 
namely,  what  is  continuous  of  love. 

3390.  'It  came  to  pass,  because  the  days  were  pro- 
longed to  him'  (Gen.xxvi.8)  =  a  state  of  reception.  .  . 
'Days' =  states. 

3419.  'The  days  of  Abraham  his  father'  (ver.i8)  = 
time  and  state  antecedent  as  to  truths.  .  .  'Days' = 
time  and  state.  Refs. 

3462.  'It  came  to  pass  in  that  day'  (ver.32)  =  thc 
state  (of  doctrine). 

3467.  'Even  to  this  day'  (ver.33)  =  the  perpetuity  of 
the  state.     4304.  4316. 

3498.  '  I  know  not  the  day  of  my'death'  (Gen.xxvii.  2) 
=  life  in  the  Natural.  ' Day '  =  state  .  .  .  Thus  by  'the 
day  of  death'  is  signified  a  state  of  resuscitation  to  life. 

3607.  'The  days  of  mourning'  (ver.4i)  =  the  inversion 
of  the  state. 


Day 


27 


Day 


3613.  'Tarry  with  him  some  days'  (ver. 44)  —  what  is 
successive.  .  .  '  Days '  =  times  and  states. 

37035.  'Days  upon  the  land'  (Ex. xx.  12)  =  states  of 
good  thence  in  the  Lord's  Kingdom.     '  Days '  =  states. 

3755-  'Those  days'  (Matt.xxiv.  19)  =  the  states  in 
which  the  Church  would  then  be. 

e.   'The  days  being  shortened'  (ver. 22)  =  a  state 

of  removal. 

37S5.  'Behold,  as  yet  the  day  is  great'  (Gen.xxix.7) 
that  the  state  was  now  advancing. 

3814.  'He  dwelt  with  him  a  month  of  days'  (Gen. 
xxix.i4)=a  new  state  of  life.  .  .  'A  month  of  days'  =  a 
new  state.  .  .  When  a  year,  month,  or  day  is  mentioned 
in  the  singular,  it  =  a  whole  state,  thus  the  end  of  the 
former  and  the  beginning  of  the  following  one. 

3827.  'They  were  in  his  eyes  as  some  days  in  his 
loving  her' (ver. 20)  =  a  state  of  love.  .  .  ' Days '  =  states. 

3830.  'Because  my  days  are  fulfilled  that  I  may  come 
to  her'  (ver. 21)  =  that  now  is  the  state.     ' Days '  =  states. 

3941.  'Reuben  went  in  the  days  of  harvest'  (Gen. 
xxx.  1 4)  =  faith  as  to  its  state  of  love  and  charity. 
'  Days '  =  states. 

4010.  'He  put  a  way  of  three  days  between  himself 
and  Jacob'  (ver. 36)  =  their  state  quite  separated... 
'  Days '  =  states. 

4060.  'Immediately  after  the  affliction  of  those  days' 
(Matt.xxiv. 29)= the  state  of  the  Church  as  to  the  truth 
which  is  of  faith.  .  .  '  Days '  =  states. 

41 19.  'It  was  told  Laban  on  the  third  day'  (Gen. 
xxxi.22)  =  the  end  of  conjunction.  'The  third  day'  = 
what  is  last,  and  also  what  is  complete,  thus  the  end, 
and  also  the  beginning ;  for  the  end  of  a  state  of  con- 
junction is  the  beginning  of  the  following  state,  which 
is  one  of  separation,  which  state  is  also  here  signified  by 
'the  third  day.' 

4175.  'In  the  day  the  heat  devoured  me,  and  the  cold 
in  the  night'  (ver. 40)  =  temptations.  .  .  'Day'  =  a  state 
of  faith  or  truth,  which  is  then  at  its  height ;  and 
'night'  a  state  of  no  faith  or  truth. 

4334-  'Of  that  day  and  hour  knoweth  no  one'  (Matt, 
xxiv.  36)  =  that  the  state  of  the  Church  at  that  time 
would  not  appear  to  anyone,  either  on  earth  or  in 
Heaven.  By  'day  and  hour'  here  are  not  meant  day 
and  hour,  or  time,  but  the  state  as  to  good  and  truth. 

4387.  'Esau  returned  in  that  day  to  his  way  to  Seir' 
(Gen.  xxxiii.  16)  =  the  state  of  Divine  natural  good  at  that 
time  to  which  the  goods  of  truth  were  adjoined.  'Day' 
=  state. 

4495.  'It  came  to  pass  on  the  third  day'  (Gen.xxxiv. 
25)  =  what  is  continuous  even  to  the  end.  'The  third 
day  '  =  what  is  complete  from  beginning  to  end,  thus 
also  what  is  continuous.  Ex.  and  111. 

4548.  'Who  answered  me  in  the  day  of  my  straitness' 
(Gen. xxxv. 3)  =  in  a  state  in  which  he  preferred  truth  to 
good.     '  Day '  =  state. 

4616.  'And  the  days  of  Isaac  were'  (ver. 28)  =  the 
state  now  of  the  Divine  Rational.     '  Days '  =  states. 

4620.  'Old  and  full  of  days'  (ver. 29)  =  what  is  new  of 
life.  .  .  'Full  of  days' =  a  full  state. 


47S0.  'He  mourned  over  his  son  many  days'  (Gen. 
xxxvii.  34)  =  a  state  of  mourning  for  destroyed  good  and 
truth.  .  .  '  Days '  =  states  ;  here,  states  of  great  mourning, 
because  it  is  said  'many  days.' 

4850.  'The  days  were  multiplied'  (Gen.xxxviii.  12)  =  a 
change  of  state.  .  .  For  'day,'  or  time,  in  the  internal 
sense,  is  state. 

49012.  There  are  no  days  and  years  there,  because  the 
Sun  there  ...  is  always  rising  and  never  sets. 

49263.  'To  build  according  to  the  days  of  eternity' 
(Amos  ix.  1 1  )  =  according  to  the  state  of  the  Church  in 
ancient  times ;  that  state,  and  that  time,  in  the 
Word,  are  called  'the  days  of  eternity,'  and  'the  days 
of  an  age,'  and  also  those  ' of  generation  and  generation.' 

5000.  'She  spake  to  Joseph  day  by  day'  (Gen.xxxix. 
10)  =  thought  concerning  that  thing.  .  .  'Day  by  day,' 
or  every  day = intensely. 

5089.  'They  were  for  days  in  custody'  (Gen.xl.4)  = 
that  they  were  a  long  time  in  a  state  of  rejection. 
' Days '  =  states  ;  here,  therefore,  'for  days'  =  a  long  time 
in  a  state. 

5122.  'The  three  shoots  are  three  days'  (ver.  12) = con- 
tinuous derivations  even  to  the  last.  .  .  'Days' -states. 

5123.  'Yet  within  three  days'  (ver.  13)  =  then  what  is 
new.  .  .  'Days' =  states.  .  .  Hence  it  is  evident  that 
'three  days' =  a  complete  state;  consequently,  'within 
three  days,'  or  after  three  days,  =  a  new  state  ;  for  after 
a  state  is  completed  a  new  one  commences. 

5153.  'Are  three  days'  (ver.  18)  =  even  to  the  last. 

5154.  'Yet  within  three  days'  (ver.  19)= that  which 
is  in  the  last. 

5159.  'It  came  to  pass  on  the  third  day'  (ver. 20)= in 
the  last.  'The  third  day '  =  the  last  state  ;  for  'day'  = 
state. 

5265.  Hence  the  seventh  day  was  made  holy. 

527oe.  Wherefore,  in  the  representative  Church  the 
days  commenced  in  the  evening, 

53602.  This  state  (of  desolation  and  vastation)  is 
called  'the  great  day  of  Jehovah,'  'the  day  of  wrath' 
and  'of  His  vengeance,'  'the  day  of  darkness'  and  'of 
thick  darkness,'  'of  cloud,'  and  'of  dimness,'  'the 
day  of  visitation,'  also  'the  day  when  the  earth  will 
perish,'  thus  'the  last  day,'  and  'the  day  of  judgment ; ' 
and  as  they  have  not  understood  the  internal  sense  of 
the  Word  they  have  hitherto  supposed  that  it  is  the 
day  when  the  earth  will  perish  .  .  .  not  knowing  that 
by  'day'  here  is  signified  state,  and  by  'the  earth,'  the 
Church  ;  thus  by  'the  day  when  the  earth  will  perish,' 
the  state  when  the  Church  will  be  destroyed. 

5458.  'Joseph  said  to  them  on  the  third  day'  (Gen. 
xlii.  i8)=the  perception  of  the  Celestial  of  the  Spiritual 
concerning  those  truths  separated  from  itself,  when 
fulfilment  has  taken  place.  .  .  'In  the  third  day '  =  the 
last  state  when  there  comes  a  new  one,  thus  when 
fulfilment  has  taken  place. 

5612.  'I  shall  sin  against  thee  in  all  days'  (Gen.xliii. 
9)  =  that  the  Church  will  no  longer  possess  any  good.  .  . 
'In  all  days '  =  in  perpetuity,  thus  no  longer. 

5798s.  The  last  time  of  the  Church  and  its  destruc- 
tion, is  called  'the  day  of  Jehovah's  anger.' 


Day 


28 


Day 


[A.]  60003.  'Day'  (John  ix.4)  =  truth  from  good; 
'night,'  falsity  from  evil.  It  is  the  first  time  of  the 
Church  which  is  meant  by  '  day,'  for  truth  is  then  received 
because  they  are  in  good  ;  and  it  is  the  last  time  which 
is  signified  by  'night,'  for  then  nothing  of  truth  is 
received  because  they  are  not  in  good. 

6093.  'How  many  are  the  days  of  the  years  of  thy 
life  ? '  (Gen.  xlvii.  8)  =  concerning  the  state  of  the  natural 
life  from  the  spiritual.      'Days,'  and  also  'years' estates. 

6095.  'The  days  of  the  years  of  my  sojournings'  (ver. 
9)  =  concerning  what  is  successive  of  life.  'Days'  and 
'  years '  =  states. 

6097.  'Few  and  evil  have  been  the  days  of  the  years 
of  my  life'  (id. )  =  that  the  state  of  the  natural  life  is  full 
of  temptations.      'Days' and  'years' =  states. 

6098.  'And  have  not  attained  to  the  days  of  the  years 
of  the  life  of  my  fathers'  (id. )  —  that  he  was  not  raised 
to  the  state  of  their  life.  'Day'  and  'years  of  life'  = 
.states  of  the  spiritual  life. 

6165.   'Even  to  this  day'  (Gen. xlvii. 26)  =  to  eternity. 

6175.  'The  day  of  Jacob,  the  years  of  his  life,  was 
seven  years  and  a  hundred  and  forty  years '  (ver.  28)  — 
the  general  state  and  its  quality. 

6176.  'The  days  of  Israel  drew  near  for  dying'  (ver. 
29)  =  the  state  immediately  before  regeneration.  .  . 
'  Days  '  =  states. 

6278.  'From  then  even  to  this  day' (Gen.xlviii.  15)  = 
continually.  'To-day,'  and  'to  this  day' =  what  is  per- 
petual and  eternal  .  .  . 

6298.  'He  blessed  them  in  this  day'  (Gen.xlviii. 20)  = 
foresight  and  providence  to  eternity.  .  .  'In  this  day,' 
or  to-day  =  what  is  eternal. 

6337.  'I  will  tell  you  what  shall  happen  at  the  end 
of  the  days'  (Gen.xlix. i)  =  the  quality  of  the  state  of 
the  Church  in  that  order  in  which  they  then  were.  .  . 
'The  end  of  the  days'  =  the  last  of  the  state,  in  which 
they  are  together  ;  for  '  days '  =  states. 

6505.  'Forty  days  were  fulfilled  to  him'  (Gen.  1.1,3) 
=  a  state  of  preparation  through  temptations.  .  .  'Days' 
=  states. 

6508.    'Seventy  days'  (id.)  =  a  full  state. 

6573.  'In  order  to  do  according  to  this  day'  (ver. 20)  = 
that  it  is  according  to  order  from  eternity  .  .  .  'Accord- 
ing to  this  day '  =  from  eternity. 

6699.  Some  myriads  of  men  flow  thither  daily-^e/- 
diem. 

6755.  'It  came  to  pass  in  those  days  and  Moses  grew' 
(Ex.ii.  Il)=when  these  states  lasted,  and  increase  in 
scientific  truths.     'Days'  =  states. 

6767-.  'The  day  of  killing'  (Jer.xii.3)  =  the  time  of  the 
vastation  of  the  Church,  when  there  is  no  longer  any 
faith  because  no  charity.     8902^. 

679S.  'It  came  to  pass  in  these  many  days'  (Ex.ii. 23) 
=  after  many  changes  of  state.      'Days' estates. 

71 10.  'Pharaoh  commanded  in  that  day'  (Ex.v.6)  = 
the  cupidity  of  infesting  the  truths  of  the  Church  while 
in  that  state.  .  •  ' Day '  =  state. 

7133.   'Fulfil  your  works,  the   word  of  a  da*y  in  its 


own  day'  (ver.  13)  =  that  they  should  serve  falsities  so 
called  in  every  state.  .  .  '  The  word  of  a  day  iu  its  own 
day'  =  in  every  state.     7157. 

7240.  '  It  came  to  pass  in  that  day  Jehovah  spake  to 
Moses  in  the  land  of  Egypt'  (Ex.vi.28)  =  the  state  of  the 
Church  at  the  time  when  command  was  given  by  the 
law  from  the  Divine  to  those  ayIio  were  of  the  Lord's 
Spiritual  Kingdom,  while  still  in  the  vicinity  of  those  in 
the  Hells.     '  Day '= state. 

7680.  'All  that  day,  and  all  that  night'  (Ex.x.i3)  = 
everything  of  perception,  both  obscure  and  not  obscure, 
with  those  who  infest,  that  it  was  destroyed.  'Day'  = 
a  state  of  perception  not  obscure  ;  '  night' =  a  state  of 
obscure  perception  ;  for  the  times  of  the  day  .  .  .  corre- 
spond to  the  enlightenments  which  are  of  intelligence 
and  wisdom  ;  thus  to  perceptions  ;  in  general,  day  and 
night. 

7715-   'For  three  days' (Ex.x.22)  =  a  full  state.  Ex. 

7887.  'Even  in  the  first  day  ye  shall  make  leaven  to 
cease  from  your  houses'  (Ex.xii. I5)  =  that  nothing  false 
whatever  shall  be  in  good.  '  The  first  day '  =  the  begin- 
ing  of  that  state.     7891. 

7S90.  'From  the  first  day  even  to  the  seventh  day' 
(id.)=a  holy  full  state.  'Seven  days' =  a  holy  state, 
and  also  a  full  state. 

7S92.  'In  the  seventh  day  there  shall  be  a  holy  con- 
vocation for  you'  (ver.  1 6)= thus  in  the  end  of  the  state. 
'  The  seventh  day, '  which  was  the  last  one  of  the  feast, 
=  the  end  thereof. 

7905.  'For  seven  days' (ver.  i9)  =  the  entire  period  of 
this  state.  'Seven  days' =  a  holy  state,  and  also  an  entire 
period  from  beginning  to  end,  or  a  full  state  :  the  same 
as  'a  week.' 

8017.  ' It  came  to  pass  in  this  same  day'  (ver. 51)  =  a 
state  of  the  Lord's  presence.     '  Day '  =  time  and  state. 

8059.  '  In  the  seventh  day  a  feast  to  Jehovah '  (Ex. 
xiii.6)  =  the  holy  worship  of  the  Lord.  'The  seventh 
day'  =  a  holy  state. 

8400.  'In  the  fifteenth  day  of  the  second  month'  (Ex. 
xvi.  i)  =  the  state  relatively.  .  .  '  Month '  =  the  end  of  a 
former  state  and  the  beginning  of  a  following  one,  thus 
a  new  state  ;  '  day '  =  state  in  general.  Refs. 

8418.  'They  shall  gather  the  word  of  a  day  in  its  own 
day'  (Ex. xvi. 4)  =  constantly  for  the  necessity.  Ex. 

8421.  'It  shall  be  in  the  sixth  day'  (ver. 5)= in  the 
end  of  each  state.     '  Day '  =  state.     8488. 

8506.  'Six  days  shall  ye  gather  it' (ver. 26)  =  the  recep- 
tion of  truth  before  it  is  conjoined  with  good.  'Six 
days'  =  a  state  of  combat  and  labour;  here,  a  state  of 
the  reception  of  truth,  or  the  state  in  which  good  is 
acquired  through  truth,  for  in  this  state  there  are  com- 
bat and  labour .  .  . 

8633.  They  have  no  holy-/es^o.s-days  (in  Jupiter). 

8752.  'In  this  day'  (Ex.xix. i)  =  at  that  time.  .  . 
'Day'  =  state  ;  wherefore,  'in  this  day'  =  at  the  time 
when  there  is  fulness  of  state. 

8888.  See  Combat  at  this  ref. 

e.  The  prior  state  (of  regeneration)  is  signified  by 

the  six  days  which  precede  the  seventh,  and  the  posterior 
state  by  the  seventh  day.     943 ie. 


Day 


29 


Day 


8898.  'That  thy  days  may  be  prolonged  upon  the 
Land'  (ver.  12)  =  the  consequent  state  of  life  in  Heaven. 
.  .  .  'Thy  days' =: the  state  of  life. 

89022.  It  treats  here  of  the  last  time  of  the  Church, 
when  there  are  no  longer  any  faith  and  charity,  which 
time  is  'the  cruel  day  of  Jehovah  .  .  .'  (Is.xiii.9). 

89063.  'The  day  of  Jehovah '  (Joel  ii.  1 )  =  the  last  state, 
or  the  last  time  of  the  Church,  when  there  is  no  longer 
any  truth,  but  in  the  place  of  truth  there  is  falsity. 

9037.  'If  he  shall  continue  a  day  or  two'  (Ex.xxi.21) 
==  a  state  of  life  remaining  even  to  the  full.  '  Day '  =  the 
state  of  life;  'two  da,ys-biduum' =ihe  succeeding  state, 
thus  a  full  state. 

91983.  'The  days  of  Elias'  (Luke  iv.25)  =  the  state  of 
reception  of  truth  Divine  from  the  Word  at  that  time 
.  .  .  '  Days '  —  states. 

9226.  'Seven  days  shall  it  be  with  its  mother'  (Ex. 
xxii.3o)  =  the  first  state  with  truths.  'Seven  days' = 
the  first  state  of  those  who  are  being  regenerated  ;  for 
'  days'  =  states. 

9227.  'On  the  eighth  day  thou  shalt  give  it  Me' 
(id.)  =  the  beginning  of  the  following  state,  when  the 
life  is  from  good.  .  .  '  The  eighth  day '  =  the  beginning  of 
the  following  state. 

9326.  'The  number  of  thy  days  I  will  fulfil'  (Ex. 
xxiii.26)  =  even  to  a  full  state.  '  Days '  =  states  of  life. 
Refs. 

9431.  'Six  days'  (Ex.xxiv. i6)  =  while  in  a  state  of 
truth.  Ex. 

9432.  'He  called  to  Moses  in  the  seventh  day'  (id. )  = 
when  truth  is  conjoined  with  good.  'The  seventh  day' 
=  the  second  state,  when  truth  is  conjoined  with  good, 
or  when  man  is  in  good. 

10122.  'Daily-m  diem,'  or  every  day  (Ex. xxix. 36)  = 
continually. 

10127.  'Seven  days  thou  shalt  propitiate  upon  the 
altar'  (ver.  37) -what  is  full  as  to  influx  into  Heaven  and 
the  Church.     'Seven  days '  =  what  is  full. 

10132.  'Daily'  (ver.38)  =  in  every  state  ;  for  by  'day' 
is  signified  state,  and  by  the  morning  of  the  day  and  its 
evening  on  which  the  burnt-offerings  of  lambs  were  to 
be  made,  is  signified  every  state. 

102 1 75.  'To  number  our  days'  (Ps.xc.  12)  =  to  order 
and  dispose  the  states  of  life  ;  and  the  days  are  said  to 
be  numbered  when  they  are  ordered  and  disposed,  thus 
when  they  are  finished  ;  as  in  Is.xxxviii.  10. 

106094.  It  here  treats  of  the  Lord's  Advent,  for  this 
is  signified  by  'the  day  of  Jehovah'  (Joel  i.  15). 

1077 1.  Relatively  to  the  time  of  the  days  in  our  Earth, 
the  day  (in  the  Fifth  Earth)  is  fifteen  hours  long. 

10834.  (The  Spirits  of  the  Sixth  Earth)  said  .  .  .  that 
their  day  is  equal  to  nine  hours  of  our  time,  which  they 
were  able  to  ascertain  from  the  length  of  the  days  in  our 
Earth  as  perceived  in  me. 

H.  1553.  It  is  from  this  correspondence  that  'a  day,' 
and  'a  year,'  in  the  Word,  =  the  states  of  life  in  general, 
(g).  Refs.     W.733. 

452.  See  DiE-o&ire,  at  these  refs.     T.138. 


L.  4.  In  this  first  article  I  shall  merely  adduce 
passages  from  the  Word  in  which  it  is  said  'that 
day,'  'in  that  day,'  and  'in  that  time  ;'  in  which  by 
'day'  and  'time'  are  meant  the  Advent  of  the  Lord. 

Fully  111. 

5.  In  these  passages,  by  'day'  and  'time'  is  meant 
the  Advent  of  the  Lord  ;  by  'the  day'  or  'time  of  dark- 
ness,' 'of  thick  darkness,'  'of  dimness,'  'of  no  light,'  'of 
devastation,'  'of  the  end  of  iniquity,'  'of  destruction,' is 
meant  the  Advent  of  the  Lord  when  He  was  no  longe* 
known,  and  therefore  when  there  was  no  longer  any- 
thing of  the  Church  remaining.  By  'a  day  cruel,' 
'terrible,'  'of  wrath,'  'of  anger,'  'of  tumult,'  'of  visita- 
tion,' 'of  sacrifice,'  'of  retribution,'  'of  straitness,'  !of 
war,'  'of  a  cry,'  is  meant  the  Advent  of  the  Lord  to 
judgment.  By  'the  day  in  which  Jehovah  alone  shall 
be  exalted,'  'in  which  He  shall  be  one  and  His  name 
one,'  'in  which  the  branch  of  Jehovah  shall  be  for 
ornament  and  glory,'  'in  which  the  righteous  shall 
flourish,'  'in  which  he  shall  be  vivified,'  in  which  he 
shall  seek  his  flock,'  'in  which  he  shall  make  a  new 
covenant,'  'in  which  the  mountains  shall  drop  new 
wine,'  'in  which  living  water  shall  go  forth  from  Jeru- 
salem,' 'in  which  they  shall  look  back  to  the  God  of 
Israel,'  and  many  similar  expressions,  is  meant  the 
Advent  of  the  Lord  to  establish  a  new  Church,  which 
shall  acknowledge  Him  as  the  Redeemer  and  Saviour. 

S.  I4e.  By  'the  day  of  Jehovah'  (Is.xxiv.21  ;  Joel 
ii.  1  ;  iii.  14)  is  meant  the  Advent  of  the  Lord,  which 
took  place  where  there  was  no  longer  any  residue  of 
good  and  truth  in  the  Church,  and  not  any  Knowledge 
of  the  Lord. 

W.  732.  Their  Sun  is  constantly  in  its  Orient  .  .  . 
hence  they  have  no  days,  etc. 

390e.  The  most,  after  a  period  of  two  d&ys-biduum- 
out  of  the  body,  are  in  the  Spiritual  World  ;  in  fact,  I 
have  spoken  with  some  after  two  days.     H.3124. 

R.  42.  'Unless  those  days  should  be  shortened,  no 
flesh  should  be  saved,  but  for  the  elect's  sake  those  days 
shall  be  shortened'  (Matt.xxiv.22)=:that  unless  the 
Church  were  finished  before  its  time  it  would  utterly 
perish. 

• -e.  Hence  also  it  is,  that  in  the  Word  an  entire 

period  is  called  'a  day;'  its  first  state  'daybreak'  and 
'  morning, '  and  its  last  '  evening '  and  '  night. ' 

101.  'Ye  shall  have  affliction  ten  days'  (Rev.ii.  10)  = 
that  this  is  to  last  the  full  time,  that  is,  as  long  as  they 
will  to  remain  in  falsities.  .  .  'Ten  days' =  the  duration 
of  that  state  to  the  full  .  .  .  because  ' days '  =  states. 


380.  'They  serve.  Him  day  and  night' (Rev. vii.  15)  = 
that  they  constantly  and  faithfully  live  according  to  the 
truths,  that  is,  the  precepts,  which  they  receive  from 
Him.     E.478.  3,Ex. 

414.  'That  the  day  shone  not  for  a  third  part  of  it, 
and  the  night  likewise'  (Rev.viii.  I2)=that  there  was  no 
longer  with  them  from  the  Word  any  spiritual  truth  or 
natural  truth  serviceable  for  doctrine  and  life.  By  'the 
day  not  shining'  is  meant  that  there  was  no  light  from 
the  sun,  and  by  'the  night  likewise'  is  meant  that  there 
was  no  light  from  the  moon  and  stars.  By  light  in 
general  is  signified  Divine  truth  .  .  .  Divinetruth  in  the 


Day 


30 


Day 


spiritual  sense  of  the  Word  is  as  the  light  of  the  sun  in 
the  day  ;  and  Divine  truth  in  its  natural  sense  is  as  the 
light  of  the  moon  and  stars  in  the  night  .  .  .  These 
things  are  also  meant  by  'day'  and  'night'  in  the 
following  passages.   111.     E.527.  4,I11. 

[R.]  446.  'An  hour,  a  day,  a  month,  and  a  year' 
(Rev.ix.  15)  =  continually  and  perpetually;  the  same  as 
all  time.     E.571. 

637.  'They  shall  have  no  rest  day  and  night'  (Rev. 
xiv. ii)=their  perpetual  state  in  undelightful  things 
after  death.  .  .  By  'day  and  night'  is  signified  all  time, 
and  in  the  spiritual  sense,  in  every  state,  and  thus 
perpetually  ;  for  in  that  sense  '  day  and  night '  =  states 
of  life. 

704.  That  fighting  against  the  truths  of  the  New 
Church  (is  signified),  is  because  it  is  said  'in  that  great 
day  of  God  Almighty'  (Rev.xvi.  14),  and  by  that  day  is 
signified  the  Advent  of  the  Lord,  and  then  a  New  Church. 

— 2,iu.  707,111. 

e.  As  it  is  the  consummation  of  the  age  .  .  .  when 

the  Advent  of  the  Lord  and  the  beginning  of  the  New 
Church  take  place,  by  'the  day  of  Jehovah'  in  many 
places  is  signified  the  end  of  the  former  Church  .  .  . 

765.  'In  one  day'  (Rev.xviii.8)  =  the  time  of  the  Last 
Judgment,  which  is  also  called  'the  day  of  judgment.' 
E.i 124. 

S64.  'To  be  tormented  day  and  night'  (Rev.xx.  10)  = 
to  be  interiorly  infested  constantly. 

T.  200e.  'Day,'  mentioned  twice  (Is.xix.23,24)  means 
the  first  and  the  second  Advent  of  the  Lord. 


Hist.  Crea.  i.  5.  By  'a  day'  here  and  in  the  rest  of 
this  chapter  is  not  meant  a  common  day,  but  the  whole 
space  of  that  time,  or  that  whole  time  of  the  creation  in 
which  the  sun,  the  globe  of  the  future  Earth,  and  the 
ethereal  atmospheres  came  forth  ;  for  in  the  Holy 
Scriptures  entire  periods  of  time  are  called  'days.' 
Ad.  9. 

8.  'And  there  came  forth  from  the  evening  and  the 
morning  the  second  day,'  or  the  second  space  of  time, 
within  which  was  made  the  aerial  atmosphere  .  .  .  for 
with  God  ...  a  thousand  years,  that  is,  a  great  length 
of  time,  are  as  a  day.     Ad.  8.  9. 

Ad.  3.  These  'days'  are  to  be  called  days  of  creation, 
and  mean  entire  spaces  of  time  ...     8. 

D.  1973.  What  is  meant  by  'the  evening  and  the 
morning  a  day'  (Gen.i).  .  .  That  ' day '  — time  in  general, 
may  be  very  well  known  from  the  Scriptures,  for  this 
word  means  time. 

2680.  The  heavenly  changes  and  revolutions  .  .  .  are 
represented  in  the  world  by  days,  etc. 

5493.  On  the  fourth  day  after  death  (Er.Br.)  was 
called  to  judgment  ...  On  the  same  day  he  was  at  once 
cast  into  Hell  .  .  . 

5495.  On  the  fourth  day  he  was  taken  out  thence,  and 
his  former  life  such  as  he  had  in  the  world  was  granted 
to  him,  and  on  the  fifth  day  he  rushed  into  every  kind 
of  wickedness  .  .  .  and  was  also  several  times  most 
grievously  punished  ;  which  was  on  the  fifth  day  after 
death. 


E.  634.  'The  days  come,  when  ye  shall  long  to  see 
one  of  the  days  of  the  Son  of  Man,  but  ye  shall  not  see 
it'  (Lukexvii.22) :  'to  long  for  one  of  the  days  of  the 
Son  of  Man'  =  to  long  for  truth  Divine  which  is  genuine 
in  some  respect. 

137.  'In  the  days  wherein  Antipas  was  My  faithful 
martyr,  who  was  slain  among  you'  (Rev.ii.  13)  =  in  that 
time  and  state  wherein  all  are  hated  who  profess  the 
Divine  Human  of  the  Lord.  'Day'  — time  and  state. 
Refs. 

I99e.  'Upon  Thy  book  all  my  days  were  written,  in 
which  they  were  formed  ;  and  not  one  of  them  is  want- 
ing' (Ps.  exxxix.  16)  =  all  the  states  of  life  .  .  . 

285.  'They  have  no  rest  day  and  night,  saying,  Holy, 
Holy,  Holy'  (Rev.iv.8)  =  the  Most  Holy  which  proceeds 
from  the  Lord.  Ex. 

298s.   'The  day  of  anger'  (Ps.cx.5)  =  a  state  of  combat. 

3043.  'The  day  of  Jehovah'  (Is.xiii.9)=the  last  end 
of  the  Church,  when  comes  the  judgment.     72124. 

31512.  'We  are  killed  every  day'  (Ps.xliv.22)=that  of 
ourselves  we  are  always  falling  into  falsities  and  being 
led  astray  by  them,  especially  at  the  time  when  falsities 
reign. 

15.   'The  day  of  the  great  slaughter'  (Is.xxx.25)  = 

the  Last  Judgment,  when  the  wicked  are  condemned 
and  perish.     405fi. 

328s.  The  casting  down  into  Hell  of  those  who  were 
insurgent  ...  is  meant  by  .  .  .  'the  day  of  vengeance  is 
in  Mine  heart'  (Is.lxiii.4). 

372s.  That  they  would  know  neither  good  nor  truth, 
is  signified  by  'the  sun  shall  set  upon  the  prophets,  and 
the  day  shall  become  black  over  them'  (Mic.iii.6) :  'the 
sun '  =  the  good  of  love  ;  and  'the  day,'  the  truth  of 
faith  .  .  . 

386".  'The  days  of  the  entire'  (Ps.xxxvii. i8)  =  the 
states  of  those  who  are  in  good  and  thence  in  truths,  or 
who  are  in  charity  and  thence  in  faith. 

39113.  'In  that  day'  (Is.xix.  i8)  =  the  Advent  of  the 
Lord,  and  the  states  of  those  at  that  time  who  are  in 
scientific  truths  from  the  Lord.     548s.  6$47. 

40112.  'The  day  of  Jehovah  cruel,  of  indignation  and 
of  wrath  of  anger'  (Is.xiii.9)  =  the  day  of  the  Last  Judg- 
ment.    4134. 

a.  The  reason  it  said  that  'the  sun  was  made  to 

rule  by  day'  (Ps.cxxxvi.8),  is  that  'day'  =  the  light  of 
the  spiritual  man,  for  it  has  enlightenment  and  per- 
ception from  the  good  of  love. 

40523.  This  Judgment  is  what  is  meant  in  the  Word 
of  the  Old  Testament  by  'the  day  of  indignation,'  'of 
anger,'  'of  wrath,'  'of  the  vengeance  of  Jehovah.' 

a5.    'The  day  of  Jehovah  Zebaoth'  (Is.ii.  I2)  =  the 

Last  Judgment  .  .  .  4103.  5149. 

413.  'For  the  great  day  of  His  wrath  is  come'  (Rev. 
vi.  17)= the  Last  Judgment  upon  the  evil  .  .  .  The  Judg- 
ment upon  the  evil  is  called  'the  day  of  indignation,' 
'of  wrath,'  'of  anger,'  and  'of  vengeance;'  but  the 
Judgment  upon  the  good  is  called  'the  time  of  the  Lord's 
coming,'  etc. 

7.  By  'the  day  of  Jehovah's  vengeance'  (Is.xxxiv. 


Day 


31 


Day 


8;   lxi.2),  as  by  'the  day  of  His  anger,'  and  'of  His 
wrath'  is  signified  the  Last  Judgment.     85016. 

42216.   'In  that  day'  (Zech.xiv.8)  =  His  Advent. 

43016.  'Day'  (John  xi.9)=enlightenment  in  truths 
from  good  ;  and  'the  twelve  hours  of  the  day,'  all  things 
of  truth  from  good. 

43325.  'The  days  come' (Jer.xxxi. 27)  =  the  Advent  of 
the  Lord.     7684. 

438s.  That  the  Word  shall  last  to  eternity,  is  sig- 
nified by  'as  thy  days  so  shall  thy  renown  be'  (Deut. 
xxxiii.25). 

4447.  'The  covenant  of  the  day' (Jer.xxxiii. 20)  =  con- 
junction through  love;  'the  covenant  of  the  night,' 
conjunction  through  faith.     See  527s. 

5026.  'In  that  day  the  great  trumpet  shall  sound'  (Is. 
xxvii.  13)  .  .  .  These  things  are  said  concerning  the  Ad- 
vent of  the  Lord. 

5264.  The  Last  Judgment,  which  then  follows,  is 
meant  by  'The  day  of  Jehovah  great  and  terrible'  (Joel 
ii.11).  111. 

5.  These  things  are  said  of  the  last  time  of  the 

Church,  when  the  Lord  would  come  into  the  world  and 
effect  a  Judgment  :  as  there  are  then  no  longer  any  good 
of  love  or  truth  of  faith,  but  evil  of  falsity  and  falsity 
of  evil,  it  is  called  'that  day,'  'a  day  of  darkness  and  of 
thick  darkness.'  111. 

5324.  'On  the  third  day'  (Hos.vi.2)  =  full  reformation 
and  restoration. 

5403.  'Behold,  the  day  cometh  that  burnetii  as  an 
oven'  (Mal.iv.  1)  :  these  things  are  said  of  the  last  time 
of  the  Church,  and  of  the  Last  Judgment  then. 

550.   'In  those  days'  (Rev. ix. 6)  =  then. 

5857.  'In  that  day  shall  a  man  look  back  unto  His 
Maker'  (Is.xvii.7)  .  .  .  These  things  are  said  of  the 
Advent  of  the  Lord  and  of  a  new  Church  then. 

594e.  Hence,  the  Last  Judgment,  when  they  who  are 
in  falsities  of  evil  will  perish,  is  called  'a  day  of  cloud 
and  of  dimness' (Joel.ii. 2  ;  Zeph.i.15).     11352. 

611.  'The  days  of  the  voice  of  the  seventh  Angel' 
(Rev. x.  y)  —  the  last  state  of  the  Church. 

636.  'A  thousand  two  hundred  and  sixty  days'  (Rev. 
xi.3)  =  even  to  the  end  of  the  Old  Church  and  the  be- 
ginning of  the  New  Church.  Ex. 

644.  This  revelation  and  preaching  from  revelation  at 
the  end  of  the  Church  is  what  is  chiefly  meant  by  '  the 
days  of  the  prophecy  of  the  two  witnesses'  (Rev.xi.6). 

65423.  'In  that  day' (Is. xxvii.  12)  =  the  Advent  of  the 
Lord. 

38.  '  A  day  of  cloud '  (Ezek.  xxx.  3)  =  the  state  of  the 

Church  consequent  upon  truths  not  being  understood, 
thus,  consequent  upon  falsities. 

658.  'Three  days  and  a  half  (Rev.xi.9)  =  what  is 
plenary ;  here,  plenary  extinction. 

664.  'After  three  days  and  a  half  (ver.n)  =  when 
it  was  complete  ;  thus,  the  end  of  the  Old  Church  and 
the  beginning  of  the  New  Church.  .  .  The  reason  it  is 
said  'three  days  and  a  half,'  is  that  'day'  in  the  Word  = 
states  ;  here,  the  last  state  of  the  Church.  Ex. 


684s3.  The  days  of  the  heavens'  (Ps.lxxxix.29)  =  the 
states  of  the  whole  Heaven,  which  are  from  His  Divine. 

7066.  'Three  days  and  three  nights'  (Matt.xii.4o)  =  to 
the  full. 

72 17.  'While  it  is  yet  day'  (Jer.xv.9)  =  while  the 
Word  is  still  acknowledged. 

15.  That  those  Knowledges  perish  which  are  not 

made  to  be  of  life,  is  signified  by  'in  the  midst  of  his 
days  he  forsaketh  them'  (Jer.xvii.  11). 

22.    'The  great  day'  (Jer.xxx.7)  =  the  Advent  of 

the  Lord,  and  then  the  Judgment  by  Him. 

73040.  'The  days  of  youth'  (Hos.ii. i5)=the  times  of 
the  Ancient  Church. 

747.  'Which  accuseth  them  before  God  day  and 
night'  (Rev.xii.  10)  =  and  scolded  and  disputed  with 
them  from  the  Word  continually.  .  .  'Days  aud  nights' 
=  continually  and  without  intermission  :  'days  and 
nights '  —  all  the  states  of  life;  'day,'  a  state  of  life 
when  the  mind  is  in  a  clear  idea  ;  and  'night,'  when  it 
is  in  an  obscure  one  .  .  . 

78 116.  'The  day  of  Jehovah'  (Amos  v.  18)  — the  Advent 
of  the  Lord,  Who  is  the  Messiah  Whom  they  awaited.  .  . 
But  as  the  Lord  did  not  come  for  the  sake  of  any 
kingdom  on  earth  .  .  .  and  as  the  Jewish  nation  was 
in  the  falsities  of  evil,  and  these  were  then  made 
manifest,  it  is  said,  'Woe  to  those  who  long  for  the 
day  of  Jehovah  ;  what  is  the  day  of  Jehovah  to  you  ?  it 
is  one  of  darkness  and  not  of  light. ' 

8032.  I.  Man  should  read  the  Word  every  day,  one 
chapter  or  two  .  .  . 

81 117.  'The  extremity  of  the  days'  (Jer.xlviii.47)  = 
the  Advent  of  the  Lord. 

890.  'They  shall  have  no  rest  day  and  night'  (Rev. 
xiv.  11)  =  continual  infestation  by  evils  and  thence 
falsities.  .  .  'Day  and  night '  =  continually.  .  .  By  'day' 
is  signified  the  state  of  their  falsity  ;  and  by  'night,'  the 
state  of  their  evil  ;  for  as  to  his  thoughts  man  is  in 
light,  thus  in  day,  and  as  to  his  affection,  in  obscurity 
or  in  night  .  .  .  Hence  there  was  upon  the  Tent  a  cloud 
by  day,  and  a  fire  by  night .  .  . 

9002.  'He  shall  prolong  his  days'  (Is.liii.  io)  =  the 
Divine  good,  which  proceeds  from  Him  ;  for  'long'  and 
'prolong'  is  said  of  good  ;  and  ' days '  =  states. 

1004.  'Of  that  great  day  of  God  Almighty'  (Rev.xvi. 
1 4)  =  the  last  state  of  the  Church,  when  the  Advent  of 
Lord  and  the  Last  Judgment  take  place.  .  .  Often  is  it 
said  in  the  Word  'the  great  day,'  'the  day  of  Jehovah,' 
'the  day  of  anger  and  of  wrath,'  'the  day  of  vengeance,' 
'the  terrible  day  ;'  and  in  these  places  there  is  meant 
the  last  state  of  the  Church,  and  then  the  Advent  of  the 
Lord  and  the  Last  Judgment. 

11003.  'In  that  day'  (Hos.ii.  1 8) = the  Advent  of  the 
Lord. 

D.  Wis.  vii.  42.  That  the  separation  of  the  spirit 
from  the  body  usually  takes  place  on  the  second  day 
after  the  last  agony,  has  been  given  to  know  from  the 
fact,  that  I  have  spoken  with  some  deceased  persons, 
who  were  then  Spirits,  on  the  third  day  after. 

5  M.  4.  Man  passes  into  the  Spiritual  World  usually 
on  the  third  day  after  he  has  breathed  his  last  .  .  . 


Day  after 


32 


Day  Spring 


Day  after.    Postridie. 

A.  10497.  'It  came  to  pass  the  day  after'  (Ex.xxxii. 
30)  =  the  duration  of  such  worship  even  to  the  end  of 
the  Church.  'The  day  after '  =  what  is  perpetual  and 
eternal ;  and,  when  said  of  the  Jewish  nation,  =  even  to 
the  end  of  the  Church.  The  reason  'the  day  after'  = 
what  is  perpetual  and  eternal,  is  that  'the  morrow,' 
when  said  of  such  things  as  signify  Divine  celestial  and 
spiritual  things  =  what  is  perpetual  and  eternal. 

Day,  By.     Interdiu. 

A.  8106.  'By  day  in  a  pillar  of  cloud'  (Ex.xiii.2i)  = 
that  when  there  was  a  state  of  enlightenment,  it  was 
tempered  hy  what  is  obscure  of  truth.  'By  day,'  or  'in 
the  day'  =  in  a  state  of  enlightenment.  .  .  Hence  'day' 
=  a  state  of  enlightenment  or  of  clear  perception. 
E.50410. 

9642s.  'The  arrow  that  flieth  by  day'  (Ps.xci.5)  =  the 
falsity  which  is  openly  taught. 

R.  922.  'Its  gates  shall  not  be  shut  by  day'  (Rev. 
xxi.25)  =  that  those  will  be  continually  received  into 
the  New  Jerusalem  who  are  in  truths  from  the  good  of 
love  from  the  Lord.  .  .  'By  day '  =  continually,  because 
there  is  always  light  there. 

E.  336s.  The  falsities  which  are  known  to  be  falsities, 
are  meant  by  '  the  arrow  that  flieth  by  day. ' 

59415.  Protection  against  injury  by  too  much  light 
...  is  signified  by  'a  cloud  by  day'  (Is.iv.5). 

Days,  Two.     Biduum. 

A.  24052.   'Two  days'  (Hos.vi.2)  =  the  time  and  state 
which  precedes. 
9037.  See  Day  at  these  refs.     W.390e. 

Daybreak.    Diluculum. 

A.  883.  The  time  of  evening  is  as  the  daybreak  before 
the  morning.  Ex.  .  .  As  the  evening  signified  the  day- 
break before  the  morning,  the  evening  was  so  often 
mentioned  in  the  Jewish  Church  .  .  .     2323, Ex. 

2405.  See  Dawn  at  these  refs.     T.5712. 

5579e-  In  the  Spiritual  World,  this  hunger  ...  is  the 
evening,  and  after  it  come  the  daybreak  and  the 
morning. 

6o73e.  The  daybreak  and  morning,  which  follow  the 
night,  =  the  first  of  the  Church. 

61  io6.  In  Heaven  there  is  no  night,  but  only  evening, 
which  is  succeeded  by  the  daybreak  that  precedes  the 
morning. 

821 1.  The  end  and  the  beginning  of  these  variations 
(of  state)  is  the  morning,  and,  in  special,  the  daybreak  ; 
for  then  night  is  ended  and  day  begins. 

8426e.  In  Heaven  there  are  evening  and  daybreak 
before  the  morning  ;  but  not  night. 

101343.  By  'night,'  or  'twilight'  is  signified  a  state 
of  love  in  obscurity. 

e.  That  cockcrowing  and  daybreak  are  the  same 

thing,  is  evident  from  Mark  xiii.35. 

10135.  Morning,  noon,  evening,  night  or  twilight, 
and  again  morning :  when  the  Angels  are  in  a  state  of 


.  .  .  love  in  obscurity  or  in  some  cold,  it  is  night  with 
them,  or,  rather,  it  is  the  daybreak  before  the  morning. 

H.  i55e.  ' Daybreak '  =  the  obscurity  which  precedes 
the  morning. 

(f).  'Daybreak'  — a  state  intermediate  between  the 
last  and  the  first. 

R.  4e.  See  Day  at  this  ref. 

8164.  The  last  state  of  the  Church  is  called  'even- 
ing' and  'night,'  and  its  first  state  'daybreak'  and 
'  morning. ' 

T.  335.  Once,  when  I  awoke  at  daybreak  .  .  . 

766.  When  a  man  receives  the  Lord,  by  acknowledg- 
ing Him  as  His  God,  the  Creator,  Redeemer,  and  Saviour, 
it  is  His  first  Advent,  which  is  called  'daybreak.' 


E.  92.  'Cockcrowing,'  equally  with  ' daybreak, '  =  the 
last  time  of  the  Church. 

1872.  'The  daybreak'  before  the  morning,  or  'the 
cockcrowing' = a  state  of  commencing  faith  and  charity. 

Day  Spring.     See  under  Dawn. 

Deacon.    Diaconus.   D.5079. 

Dead.     See  Half  bead. 

Dead.     See  Rephaim. 

Deadly.     See  Destruction-**///?////. 

Deadly.     Funestis.    A.775e. 

Deadly.     Internecinus. 

A.  8i8e.  See  Hate  at  these  refs.  10323.  1267. 
D.  4205,  etc. 

M.  5o9e.  This  lust  (of  varieties)  is  deadly  to  marriage 
love  ;  and,  as  marriage  love  constitutes  the  inmost  of 
life  with  man,  it  is  deadly  to  that  life. 

T.  309.  Not  to  bring  any  deadly  evil  upon  his  name 
and  reputation. 

Deadly.     See  Death-/*/A^w. 
Deaf.    Surdus. 

A.  196.  Such  are  not  only  deaf  serpents,  but  are  flying 
serpents  .  .  . 

489.  'The  deaf  that  have  ears'  (Is.xliii.8)=those  who 
comply  with  truths. 

241 78.  The  Ancient  Church  .  .  \  referred  into  classes 
all  the  goods  of  charity  ;  that  is,  all  who  were  in  good 
.  .  .  and  called  them  'the  deaf,'  etc. 

40272.  It  would  be  like  .  .  .  speaking  to  the  deaf. 

69S9.  'Deaf  (Ex.iv.  n)  =  no  perception  of  truth,  and 
consequently  no  obedience.  'The  deaf  —  those  who  do 
not  perceive  what  truth  is,  and  therefore  do  not  obey  it. 
.  .  .  The  reason  'deaf  has  this  signification,  is  that 
healing  corresponds  to  both  perception  and  obedience.  .  . 
In  the  Word,  by  'the  deaf  are  also  signified  the  gentiles 
who  do  not  know  the  truths  of  faith,  because  they  have 
not  the  Word,  and  therefore  cannot  live  according  to 
them,  and  still  when  they  are  instructed  receive  them, 
and  live  according  to  them.   111. 

.   'The  deaf  here,  (Is.xliii.8)  =  those  who,  through 


Dear 


33 


Death 


the  Advent  of  the  Lord,  would  come  into  a  state  of 
reception  of  the  truths  of  faith,  that  is,  of  perceiving 
and  obeying  them.  The  same  are  signified  by  the  deaf 
whom  the  Lord  healed.     7337. 

e.  As   'the  deaf  have  this  signification,  it  was 

forbidden  to  those  with  whom  the  Representative  Church 
was  instituted  'to  curse  the  deaf  (Lev.xix.  14). 

92094.  'The  deaf  hear'  (Lukevii.22)  .  .  .  'The  deaf 
= those  who  are  not  in  the  faith  of  truth,  because  they 
are  not  in  the  perception  of  it. 

931 15.  'He  maketh  the  deaf  to  hear'  (Mark  vii.37) : 
'the  deaf  =  those  who  do  not  know  the  truths  of  faith, 
and  therefore  cannot  live  according  to  them. 

9397e.  As  'the  deaf,'  or  those  who  do  not  hear,  are 
those  who  are  not  in  the  faith  of  truth,  because  not  in 
the  Knowledge  and  thence  in  the  apperception  of  it, 
when  the  Lord  healed  the  deaf  man,  He  'put  His  finger 
into  his  ears,  and  said,  Ephatha,  that  is,  Be  thou 
opened,  and  immediately  his  hearings  were  opened' 
(Mark  vii). 

S.  1 7*.  That  the  deaf  received  their  hearing  signified 
that  those  hearkened  and  obeyed  who  had  before  heard 
nothing  about  the  Lord  and  the  Word. 

E.  239s.  'The  deaf  who  hear  the  words  of  the  book' 
(Is.xxix.  18)  =  those  who  want  to  obey  truths,  and  there- 
by carry  on  a  life  of  good,  but  are  not  able  because  they 
have  not  the  Word. 

7.  That  those  who  are  not  in  the  perception  and 

will  of  good  will  then  be  obedient  and  live  in  good,  is 
signified  by  'the  ears  of  the  deaf  shall  be  opened'  (Is. 
xxxv.  5). 

409-.  '  Who  is  blind  but  My  Servant,  or  deaf  as  My 
Angel  Whom  I  send  ?'  (Is.xlii.  19)  .  .  .  The  reason  He  is 
called  'blind'  and  'deaf,'  is  that  the  Lord  is  as  though  He 
does  not  see  and  perceive  the  sins  of  men  ;  for  He  leads 
men  gently,  bending  and  not  breaking  ;  thus  withdraw- 
ing them  from  evils  and  leading  them  to  good  ;  wherefore 
He  does  not  chastise  and  punish  like  one  who  sees  and 
perceives.  This  is  meant  by  'Who  is  blind  but  My 
Servant,  or  deaf  as  My  Angel?'  'blind'  and  'Servant' 
being  said  in  respect  to  Divine  truth;  and  'deaf  and 
'Angel,'  in  respect  to  Divine  good  ;  for  'blind'  relates 
to  the  understanding  and  thence  to  perception  ;  and 
'deaf,'  to  perception  and  thence  to  the  will.  The 
meaning  therefore  is,  that  He  is  as  though  He  does  not 
see,  although  the  Divine  truth  is  His  from  which  He 
understands  all  things  ;  and  does  not  will  according  to 
what  He  perceives,  although  the  Divine  good  is  His, 
from  which  He  can  do  all  things. 

455'21.  'The  deaf  =  those  who  are  not  in  the  under- 
standing of  truth  and  thence  not  in  obedience. 

55617.  He  is  called  by  the  Lord  'deaf  and  dumb' 
(Mark  ix.  25),  because  he  did  not  want  to  perceive  and 
understand  truth. 

Dear.     Charus. 

A.  229.  The  Rational  suffered  itself  to  be  deceived  by 
the  proprium  because  it  was  dear  to  it. 


D.  3249.  He  induced  the  persuasion  that  he  would 
take  away  that  which  was  dearest  to  me. 
C 


4225.  They  feared  death  on  account  of  their  life  in  the 
world  and  the  body,  which  they  held  most  dear. 

Death.     See  DiE-mori,  and  DiK-mortificari. 

Death.    Lethus. 

Deadly.     Let /talis,  Lethiferus. 

A.  817.  Thus  there  arose  the  suspicion  that  he  had 
perpetrated  something  deadly  during  the  bodily  life. 
D.  1260. 

1035.  That  such  a  deadly-fe^i/era-and  suffocative 
persuasion  should  no  longer  come  forth.  Sig. 

14584.  'Before  ...  He  turn  it  into  a  deadly  shade' 
(Jer.xiii.  16). 

15 15.  The  stench  (of  a  certain  woman)  was  as  it  were 
deadly. 

7686e.  The  falsity  which  (the  Nephilim)  infused  was 
attended  with  a  direful  Persuasive,  and  was  deadly  .  .  . 

P.  1122.  Gangrenous  sores  .  .  .  which  bring  death  to 
the  body. 

R.  425.  'A  scorpion' =  a  deadly  Persuasive  .  .  .  For 
when  a  scorpion  stings  a  man,  it  induces  a  stupor  upon 
the  limbs,  and,  if  it  is  not  cured,  death. 

61 12.  Death  floats  before  their  eyes. 

M.  53.  This  state  is  the  death  of  your  joys. 

T.  1 65s.  Like  one  who  ...  is  struck  (by  a  scorpion) 
with  a  deadly  wound. 


E.  70614.  That  'they  should  not  be  hurt  if  they  drank 
a  deadly  thing'  (Markxvi.  i8)  =  that  the  wickedness  of 
the  Hells  should  not  infect  them. 

Debate.     See  under  Controvert. 

Debate.     Disceptare,  Disceptatio. 

A.  367  7e.  They  love  only  ...  to  debate,  not  what 
they  are,  but  whether  they  are  ;  and,  so  long  as  they  are 
in  this  state,  they  will  not  know  anything  whatever 
about  these  innumerable  things.     3747e- 

9818.  They  who  are  in  the  Celestial  Kingdom  .  .  . 
never  have  any  debate  about  truths  ;  so  much  so,  that 
when  the  conversation  turns  to  the  subject  of  truths, 
they  merely  say,  It  is  so,  or,  It  is  not  so  .  .  . 

994211.  'To  sue  at  the  law,  and  to  want  to  take  away 
the  coat'  =  to  debate  about  truths,  and  to  want  to  per- 
suade that  they  are  not  true. 

H.  575.  The  gnashing  of  teeth  is  the  continual  debate 
and  combat  of  falsities  together,  thus  of  those  who  are 
in  falsities,  conjoined  with  contempt  for  others,  enmity, 
mockery,  ridicule,  reviling .  .  .  These  debates  and  combats 
are  heard  outside  those  Hells  as  gnashings  of  teeth  ;  and 
are  also  turned  into  gnashings  of  teeth  when  truths 
from  Heaven  flow  in  thither  ...  All  the  fallacies  of  the 
senses  are  truths  to  them,  and  it  is  from  these  that  they 
debate.  This  is  the  reason  why  their  debates  are  heard 
as  gnashings  of  teeth  .  .  . 

P.  1972.  The  debate  was  warm. 

R.  386.  I  once  heard  as  it  were  the  gnashing  of  teeth 
.  .  .  The  Angels  said,  They  are  schools  .  .  .  where  they 
debate  together.  These  debates  are  heard  thus  at  a 
distance  ;  but  when  near,  only  as  debates.  Des.     T.460. 


Debate 


34 


Debt 


T.  72.  (A  debate  in  the  Spiritual  World  on  the  sub- 
ject, Why  does  not  God  impute  the  merit  of  His  Son  to 
everybody. ) 

336.  Among  the  ancients  it  was  .  .  .  debated  which 
of  the  two  must  be  first,  (charity  or  faith). 

E.  40540.  'He  debates  with  Israel'  (Mic.vi.2). 

Debate.     Disputare,  Disputatio. 

A.  342s3.  They  who  only  debate  whether  these  things 
exist,  and  so  long  as  they  do  so,  are  outside  the  doors  of 
wisdom,  and  are  like  persons  who  only  knock  at  the 
door,  without  being  able  to  peep  into  the  magnificent 
palaces  of  wisdom  ;  and,  what  is  wonderful,  people  who 
act  in  this  way  think  themselves  wiser  than  everybody 
else  .  .  . 

5658°.  He  who  makes  pleasure  and  wisdom  to  consist 
in  debating  whether  it  is  so  or  is  not  so,  cannot  have 
the  least  knowledge  about  the  innumerable  things  which 
are  correspondences. 

90113.  'The  iron  of  an  axe,'  and  'to  cut  wood'  =  debate 
about  good  from  religiosity. 


D.  1937.  It  was  debated  among  Spirits  .  .  .  The 
reasonings  and  replies  were  so  subtle  that  men  would 
wonder  at  the  possibility  of  carrying  on  a  discussion  by 
such  skilful  arguments.  But  I  observed  that  after  the 
discussion  some  were  so  befogged  that  they  did  not  know 
what  was  truth,  as  is  wont  to  be  the  case  with  truths 
which  are  long  debated  about ;  they  are  bedimmed,  so 
that  (the  disputants)  are  afterwards  blinded  in  the  truth 
itself. 

2695.  Against  the  principles,  as  against  the  cupidities 
of  anyone,  there  should  be  no  disputation  from  what  is 
opposite,  because  it  would  have  no  effect ;  but  principles, 
even  when  false,  are  bent  by  the  Lord  to  what  is  true, 
as  cupidities  are  into  what  is  good  ;  wherefore  the  sense 
of  the  letter  ought  not  to  be  broken. 

3459.  See  Animal  Spirit  at  this  ref. 

3493.  That  the  Knowledges  of  faith  may  be  brought 
even  to  denial  by  disputations. 

.  (Such)  are  able  to  debate  with  others,  and  even 

to  be  darkened  [without  suffering]. 

4676.  They  do  not  care  about  those  tangled  questions 
and  disputations  as  to  whether  faith  saves,  etc. 

5591.  See  SPEAK-Zogro,  at  this  ref. 

E.  7354.  'He  disputed  about  the  body  of  Moses' 
(Jude  9). 

Deborah.     Deborah. 

A.  339 13.  See  Barak  at  these  refs.     E.4474. 

87S33.  'Until  that  I  Deborah  arose,  that  I  arose  a 
mother  in  Israel'  (Judg.v.7)  ...  In  this  prophetic  song 
of  Deborah  and  Barak  it  treats  of  the  perversion  of  the 
truth  of  the  Church,  and  of  its  restoration.     E.6526. 

E-  3S533-  In  tne  song  of  Deborah  and  Barak  it  treats 
of  the  combat  of  truth  against  falsity,  and  of  the  victory 
of  the  former.     42218. 

43413.  See  Sisera  at  this  ref. 

Deborah.     Deborah.     (Rebekah's  nurse.) 
A.  4563.   'Deborah  the  nurse  of  Rebekah  died'  (Gen. 


xxxv. 8)  =  that  hereditary  evil  was  driven  out.  .  . 
'Deborah'  as  the  nurse  of  Rebekah  =  hereditary  evil. 
Ex.  .  .  But  here,  'Deborah  the  nurse  of  Rebekah' =  that 
which  was  received  from  the  mother  and  nourished  from 
infancy :  this  was  the  hereditary  evil  from  the  mother 
against  which  the  Lord  fought  .  .  .  and  which  He  drove 
out. 

3.  This  is  why  it  is  recorded  in  this  verse  that 

'Deborah  the  nurse  of  Rebekah  died  and  was  buried 
under  an  oak.' 

4564.  '  She  was  buried  beneath  Bethel  under  an  oak : 
=  that  it  was  rejected  for  ever. 

Debt.     See  Obligation-^//**;//. 

Decalogue.     Decalogus. 

See  CoiiMAND-prampere,  Law,  and  lABLE-tabula. 

A.  576"*.  That  the  Decalogue  consisted  of  ten  com- 
mandments, or  ten  words,  and  that  Jehovah  wrote  them 
on  tables  (Deut.x.  4)= remains  .  .  . 

1288.  As  '  words '  —  all  things  of  doctrine,  the  com- 
mandments of  the  Decalogue  are  called  'words.'  111. 

1 798s.  Do  not  all  doctrinal  things  belong  to  charity 
...  To  instance  only  the  commandments  of  the  Deca- 
logue .  .  . 

4.  These  are  the  commandments  of  the  Decalogue, 

which  are  exterior  doctrinal  things  of  faith,  and  which, 
with  those  who  are  in  charity  and  its  life,  are  known, 
not  down  to  the  memory,  but  are  in  his  heart .  .  . 

18342.  See  Charity  at  this  ref. 

2863s.  It  is  known  that  the  gentiles  .  .  .  had  for  a 
law  the  commandments  of  the  Decalogue.  Enum.     4190. 

3295e.  He  who  does  not  honour  his  parents,  but  learns 
to  honour  them  from  the  commandment  of  the  Decalogue; 
when  he  first  honours  them  it  is  from  the  commandment ; 
but  this  honour,  being  from  the  commandment,  is  not 
good  in  itself,  because  it  is  not  from  love,  but  either 
from  obedience  to  the  law  or  fear  of  the  law.  Still,  it  is 
called  the  good  of  truth,  although  at  its  first  coming 
forth  it  is  truth. 

68045.  The  stipulations  or  compacts  which  in  the  Word 
are  called  'a  covenant,'  are,  on  man's  part,  in  a  confined 
sense,  the  ten  commandments  or  the  Decalogue  .  .  . 

921  ie.  Let  them  take  care  they  do  not  believe  that  the 
laws  of  life  are  abrogated,  such  as  those  in  the  Decalogue, 
and  in  other  places  in  the  Old  Testament ;  for  these 
laws  have  been  confirmed  in  both  the  internal  and 
external  form,  because  they  cannot  be  separated. 

Life.  Title  page.  The  Doctrine  of  Life  for  the  New 
Jerusalem  from  the  Commandments  of  the  Decalogue. 

53.  The  Decalogue  teaches  what  evils  are  sins.  Gen. 
art. 

55e.  All  these  (miracles,  etc.)  were  from  the  mere 
presence  of  the  Lord  in  His  ten  words,  which  are  the 
commandments  of  the  Decalogue. 

64.  It  is  a  general  thing  in  the  whole  Christian  World 
for  the  Decalogue  to  be  taught,  and  for  little  children 
to  be  initiated  through  it  into  the  Christian  religion,  for 
it  is  in  the  hands  of  all  young  children  :  their  parents 
and  masters  tell  them  that  to  do  those  things  is  to  sin 


Decalogue 


35 


Decalogue 


against  God  .  .  .  Who  may  not  wonder  that  the  same 
parents  and  masters,  and  also  the  children  when  they 
become  adults,  think  that  they  are  not  under  that  law, 
and  that  they  are  not  able  to  do  the  things  of  that  law  ? 
Can  there  be  any  other  reason  than  that  they  love  evils, 
and  consequently  the  falsities  which  favour  them  ? 
These,  therefore,  are  they  who  do  not  make  the  com- 
mandments of  the  Decalogue  commandments  of  religion. 

65.  All  nations  .  .  .  with  whom  there  is  religion,  have 
similar  commandments  to  those  in  the  Decalogue  ;  and 
all  who,  from  religion,  live  them,  are  saved  ;  but  all 
who  do  not  live  them  from  religion  are  damned  .  .  .  See 
53.     R.5292. 

258*.  Everyone  born  a  Christian  knows  that  evils  are 
to  be  shunned  as  sins  from  the  fact  that  the  Decalogue 
is  placed  in  the  hands  of  every  boy  and  girl,  and  is 
taught  them  by  parents  and  masters  ;  and,  further,  all 
citizens  of  the  kingdom,  especially  the  common  people, 
are  examined  by  the  priest,  from  the  Decalogue  alone, 
repeated  from  memory,  as  to  what  they  know  of  the 
Christian  religion  ;  and  are  also  counselled  to  do  the 
things  therein  commanded.  In  no  case  is  it  then  said 
by  any  priest  that  they  are  not  under  the  yoke  of  that 
law,  or  that  they  cannot  do  the  things  commanded  be- 
cause they  cannot  do  any  good  from  themselves.    T.525. 

265s.  Again,  I  have  said,  Why  have  you  taught  your 
little  children  the  Decalogue  ?  Is  it  not  that  they  might 
know  what  evils  are  the  sins  which  are  to  be  shunned  ? 
Is  it  that  they  might  only  know  these  things,  and 
believe,  and  not  do  ?  Why,  therefore,  is  it  said  that 
this  is  new  ?  To  this  they  have  only  been  able  to  reply, 
that  they  know  and  still  do  not  know ;  and  that  they 
never  think  of  the  sixth  commandment  when  they  are 
committing  adultery,  nor  of  the  seventh  commandment 
when  they  are  stealing  or  committing  fraud,  and  so  on  .  .  . 

32611.  That  these  two  things  are  the  primary  ones  of 
every  religion,  may  be  evident  from  the  fact,  that  these 
two  things  are  what  the  Decalogue  teaches  ;  and  this 
was  the  first  of  the  Word,  was  promulgated  by  Jehovah 
from  Mount  Sinai  by  a  living  voice,  and  was  written  by 
the  finger  of  God  on  two  tables  of  stone ;  and  then, 
being  placed  in  the  ark,  was  called  'Jehovah,'  and  con- 
stituted the  Holy  of  holies  in  the  tabernacle  and  in  the 
oracle  of  the  Temple  .  .  .  and  all  the  things  there  were 
holy  from  it  alone. 

329A  What  at  this  day  is  the  Decalogue,  but  as  a 
little  book  or  writing  sealed  up,  and  open  only  in  the 
hands  of  little  children  and  youth  ?  Say  to  anyone 
somewhat  advanced  in  age,  Do  not  do  this  because  it  is 
contrary  to  the  Decalogue  ;  and  who  listens  ?  But  if 
you  say,  Do  not  do  this,  because  it  is  contrary  to  the 
Divine  laws,  he  may  listen  to  that ;  when,  nevertheless, 
the  commandments  of  the  Decalogue  are  the  Divine 
laws  themselves.  The  trial  was  made  with  many  in  the 
Spiritual  World,  and  when  the  Decalogue  or  Catechism 
was  mentioned  they  rejected  it  with  contempt :  this  was 
because  the  Decalogue  in  its  second  table,  which  is  man's, 
teaches  that  evils  are  to  be  shunned  ;  and  he  who  does 
not  shun  them  .  .  .  hears  the  Decalogue  or  Catechism 
mentioned  with  some  degree  of  contempt,  as  if  he  heard 
some  book  for  little  children  named,  which  is  no  longer 
of  any  use  to  him. 


R.  529.  By  'the  ark  in  the  temple'  (Rev.xi.19)  ig 
meant  the  Decalogue,  for  in  the  ark  were  the  two  tables 
on  which  the  Decalogue  was  written. 

669.  'After  these  things  I  saw,  and  behold,  the  temple 
of  the  tabernacle  of  the  testimony  in  heaven  was  opened' 
(Rev.xv.5)  =  that  the  inmost  of  Heaven  was  seen,  where 
the  Lord  is  in  His  holiness  in  the  Word,  and  in  the 
Law  which  is  the  Decalogue.  .  .  The  inmost  of  the 
tabernacle  was  where  the  ark  was,  in  which  were  the 
two  tables,  upon  which  the  ten  words  were  written  by 
the  finger  of  God,  which  are  the  ten  commandments  of 
the  Decalogue,  which  are  meant  by  'the  Testimony' 
.  .  .  111. 

T.  282.  The  Catechism  or  Decalogue  explained  as  to 
its  external  and  internal  sense.     Chap. 

283.  In  the  Israelitish  Church  the  Decalogue  was 
holiness  itself.  Gen.  art. 

.  As  the  commandments  of  the  Decalogue  were 

the  first-fruits  of  the  Word,  and  therefore  the  first-fruits 
of  the  Church  that  was  about  to  be  established  with  the 
Israelitish  nation,  and  as  they  were  in  a  brief  summary 
the  complex  of  all  things  of  religion,  by  which  the  con- 
junction of  God  with  man  and  of  man  with  God  takes 
place,  they  were  so  holy  that  there  is  nothing  more 
holy.  111.     284. 

289.  The  reason  the  Decalogue  in  its  spiritual  and 
celestial  senses  contains  universally  all  the  precepts  of 
doctrine  and  of  life,  thus  all  things  of  faith  and  charity. 
Ex.     E.10242,  Ex. 

582.  What  would  the  Decalogue,  the  beginning  of 
reformation,  then  be,  more  than  the  paper  sold  in  low 
shops,  and  used  to  wrap  up  spices  ? 


D.  60652.  It  was  then  replied  that  truth  and  life  are 
to  live  according  to  the  commandments  of  the  Decalogue. 
Ex. 

E.  675s.  The  reason  there  were  ten  Avoids  or  ten 
commandments,  of  which  the  Decalogue  consisted,  was 
that  'ten'  =  all  things,  and,  therefore,  by  the  'ten 
words'  is  signified  the  Law  in  the  whole  complex. 

9342.  See  WoiiK-opus,  at  this  ref. 

93  52.  The  evils  enumerated  in  the  Decalogue  contain 
within  them  all  the  evils  that  can  ever  exist,  wherefore 
they  are  called  the  ten  commandments,  because  'ten'  = 
all.  Ex. 

9392.  The  interior  of  man  is  no  otherwise  purified,  than 
as  he  desists  from  evils,  acording  to  the  commandments 
of  the  Decalogue.  Ex. 

9484.  Religion  with  man  consists  in  a  life  according  to 
the  Divine  commandments,  which,  in  sum,  are  contained 
in  the  Decalogue  :  with  him  who  does  not  live  according 
to  them  there  cannot  be  religion,  because  he  does  not 
fear  God,  still  less  love  Him ;  nor  does  he  fear  man, 
still  less  love  him  .  .  .  Yet  everyone  can  live  according 
to  these  commandments,  and  he  who  is  wise  does  so  live, 
as  a  civil  man,  as  a  moral  man,  and  as  a  natural  man  ; 
but  he  who  does  not  live  according  to  them  as  a  spiritual 
man  cannot  be  saved  ;  for  to  live  according  to  them  as  a 
spiritual  man  is  to  do  so  on  account  of  the  Divine  in  them  ; 
whereas  to  live  according  to  them  as  a  civil  man  is  to  do 
so  on  account  of  what  is  just,  and  to  avoid  the  penalties 
of  the  world  ;  and  to  live  according  to  them  as  a  moral 


Decalogue 


36 


Decant 


man  is  to  do  so  on  account  of  what  is  honest,  and  to 
avoid  the  loss  of  reputation  and  honour ;  but  to  live 
according  to  them  as  a  natural  man  is  to  do  so  on 
account  of  what  is  human,  and  to  avoid  the  ill  report  of 
not  being  of  a  sound  mind.  Ex. 

[E.]  I024e.  That  the  ten  commandments  of  the  Deca- 
logue are  all  things  of  the  Word  in  sum,  can  only  apj)ear 
from  these  commandments  as  to  their  three  senses. 

I026e.  The  first  three  commandments  (of  the  Deca- 
logue) are  of  love  to  the  Lord,  the  last  six  are  of  love 
towards  the  neighbour,  and  the  fourth  commandment, 
which  is,  'Honour  thy  father  and  thy  mother,'  is  the 
intermediate  commandment  .  .  . 

1027.  How  conjunction  is  effected  through  the  com- 
mandments of  the  Decalogue.  .  .  The  Lord  conjoins  man 
with  Himself  by  this,  that  man  knows,  understands, 
wills,  and  does  these  commandments  :  when  man  does 
them  there  is  conjunction,  but  if  he  does  not  do  them 
he  ceases  to  will  them,  and  therewith  to  understand  and 
know  them.  But  ...  as  the  Lord  alone  conjoins  man 
with  Himself,  and  not  man  himself  with  the  Lord,  and 
conjunction  is  effected  through  doing,  it  follows  that  the 
Lord  with  man  does  these  commandments.  But  (as) 
conjunction  cannot  be  effected  unless  there  is  something 
reciprocal  with  man,  the  Lord  has  endowed  man  with 
the  freedom  of  willing  and  acting  as  of  himself .  .  . 
Wherefore,  while  man  conjoins  himself  with  the  Lord 
by  means  of  the  last  six  commandments  as  of  himself, 
the  Lord  conjoins  Himself  with  man  by  the  first  three 
commandments,  which  are,  that  man  should  acknow- 
ledge God,  believe  in  the  Lord,  and  hold  His  name  holy. 
The  faith  of  these  is  not  with  man  .  .  .  unless  he  abstains 
from  the  sins  which  are  demurred  to  in  the  last  six  com- 
mandments. 

I028e.  As  they  who  abstain  from  the  evil  of  one  com- 
mandment (of  the  Decalogue),  and  shun  it  as  a  sin 
against  God,  and  are  afterwards  averse  to  it,  fear  God, 
they  come  into  communion  with  the  Angels,  and  are  led 
by  the  Lord  to  abstain  from  the  evils  of  all  the  other 
commandments,  and  to  shun  them  and  at  last  be  averse 
to  them,  as  sins  ;  and  if,  perchance,  they  have  sinned 
against  them,  still  they  repent,  and  so  by  degrees  are 
withdrawn  from  them. 

1 167.  That  man,  in  proportion  as  he  can  be  withdrawn 
from  evils,  does  good  from  the  Lord  which  is  good  in 
itself;  and  in  proportion  as  he  cannot  be  withdrawn 
from  evils,  does  good  from  himself  which  has  evil  in  it, 
may  be  illustrated  by  the  commandments  of  the  De- 
calogue. Ex. 

H79e.  I  have  seen  (those  who  had  no  worship  on 
earth),  and  at  first  they  appeared  as  if  they  were  not 
men,  but  afterwards  I  saw  them  as  men,  and  heard 
them  speaking  soundly  from  the  commandments  of  the 
Decalogue. 

J.(Post.)  340.  He  who  is  in  adultery  is  in  evil  and 
falsity,  and  adultery  is  all  sin  against  the  Decalogue, 
for  he  who  is  in  it  is  in  all  the  evil  of  the  Decalogue  ; 
and  contrariwise. 

D.  Love  xvii5.  The  evils  man  is  to  shun  are  all  con- 
spicuously written  in  the  Decalogue  .  .  . 

D.  Wis.  ix2.  The  way  man  must  go  to   come  into 


conjunction  with  the  Lord  .  .  .  the  Lord  teaches  in  the 
Word,  and  in  special  in  the  Decalogue,  wherefore  the 
two  tables  of  it  were  written  by  the  finger  of  the  Lord 
Himself,  one  of  which  regards  the  Lord,  and  the  other 
man,  and  both  conjunction  ;  wherefore,  iu  order  that 
the  way  may  be  known,  the  Decalogue  shall  be  ex- 
plained. 

De  Just.  64.  I  asked  (the  priests  from  the  Reformed) 
what  they  understand  by  good  works,  whether  such 
things  as  are  enjoined  by  the  Roman  Catholics,  or  works 
according  to  the  second  table  of  the  Decalogue.  They 
answered,  Both.  I  asked  them  whether  the  works  of 
that  table  of  the  Decalogue  contribute  anything  to 
salvation.  They  answered,  Not  anything,  but  still 
they  are  to  be  done,  because  they  are  commanded. 

Decant.     Decantare. 
Decantation.    Decantatio. 

P.  336e.  The  lungs  decant  the  blood. 

M.  1452.  The  purification  of  natural  spirits  .  .  . 
called  decantation,  etc.  (corresponds  to  the  perfecting 
of  wisdom)  as  by  decantations,  etc. 

D.  Wis.  iii.  2.  The  spermatic  vessels,  in  which  the 
seed  is  cohobated  and  decanted. 

Decease.     See  Die. 

Deceit.     Dolus. 
Deceitful.    Dolosus. 
Deceitfully.     Dolose. 

See  under  Serpent. 

A.  358.  Simulation  and  deceit  was  then  [held] 
abominable. 

623e.  'Deceit  in  his  mouth'  (Is.liii.9)  is  said  of  the 
things  of  the  understanding. 

821.  There  are  some  who  outwardly  present  an  honest 
face  and  life,  so  that  no  one  would  suspect  them  not  to 
be  honest .  .  .  They  do  not  act  openly,  but  through 
others  by  deceitful  artifices  they  despoil  others  of  their 
goods  .  .  .  They  are  hidden  robbers,  and  their  kind  of 
hatred  is  conjoined  with  conceit,  greed  for  gain,  un- 
mercifulness,  and  deceit.  (Their  state  after  death.) 
D.2492. 

824.  On  the  Hells  of  the  deceitful  and  of  witches. 
Gen.  art. 

827.  See  Adultery  at  this  ref. 

830.  They  who  deceive-decipiunt-men  with  sharp 
deceit,  putting  on  an  agreeable  face  and  address,  but 
hiding  poisonous  deceits  within,  and  thus  captivating 
men  with  the  end  of  destroying  them,  have  a  Hell  which 
is  more  fearful  than  that  of  others,  even  more  so  than 
the  Hell  of  murderers.  They  seem  to  themselves  to 
live  among  serpents  ;  and  the  more  hurtful  their  deceits 
have  been,  the  more  direful,  poisonous,  and  numerous 
do  the  serpents  appear  which  encompass  and  torture 
them  .  .  .  These  are  they  who  exercise  deceits  with  pre- 
meditation, feeling  therein  the  delight  of  life.  The 
punishments  of  the  deceitful  are  various,  each  according 
to  the  nature  of  the  deceit.  .  .  They  are  not  tolerated  in 
Societies  .  .  .  for  whatever  any  Spirit  thinks,  his  neigh- 
bours at  once  see  and  perceive,  thus  if  there  is  anything 
of  deceit,  and  also  the  nature  of  the  deceit  ;  wherefore, 


Deceit 


37 


Deceit 


being  at  last  driven  out  of  all  Societies,  they  sit  solitary, 
appearing  then  to  have  a  broad  face,  four  or  five  times 
as  broad  as  those  of  others  .  .  .  sitting  in  torment  like 
images  of  death.  There  are  others  who  are  deceitful  by 
nature,  but  not  with  premeditation,  and  not  in  a 
clandestine  manner  with  a  feigned  countenance  :  they 
are  at  once  found  out,  and  their  thought  is  manifestly 
perceived :  they  boast,  too,  about  it,  as  if  they  wanted 
to  seem  deep  :  these  have  not  such  a  Hell.  D.2857, 
below. 

947.  They  who  are  deceitful,  and  who  suppose  them- 
selves to  be  able  to  obtain  all  things  by  means  of  deceit- 
ful machinations,  and  who  in  the  life  of  the  body  have 
confirmed  themselves  from  the  fact  that  such  things 
have  succeeded  with  them,  seem  to  themselves  to  dwell 
in  a  certain  tun  on  the  left  which  is  called  the  infernal 
tun,  over  which  there  is  a  covering,  and  outside  a 
small  globe  on  a  pyramidal  base,  which  they  suppose 
to  be  the  universe  under  their  inspection  and  govern- 
ment. This  is  exactly  how  it  appears  to  them.  Those 
of  them  who  have  deceitfully  persecuted  the  innocent 
are  there  for  ages  ;  I  have  been  told  that  some  have 
been  there  already  for  twenty  centuries-saecwZa.  When 
they  are  let  out,  they  have  the  phantasy  that  the 
universe  is  a  kind  of  globe  which  they  walk  round  and 
tread  under  foot,  believing  themselves  to  be  the  gods  of 
the  universe.  I  have  sometimes  seen  them  and  have 
spoken  to  them  about  their  phantasy  ;  but  having  been 
of  such  a  character  in  the  world,  they  could  not  be 
withdrawn  from  it.  I  have  also  sometimes  perceived 
with  what  subtle  deceit  they  were  able  to  pervert  the 
thoughts,  in  a  moment  bending  them  away,  and  sub- 
stituting others,  so  that  one  could  hardly  tell  that  they 
were  from  them.  It  is  incredible  how  perfectly  natural 
it  is  to  them  to  do  this.  On  this  account,  such  are 
never  admitted  to  men,  for  they  infuse  their  poison  so 
clandestinely  and  covertly  that  it  is  not  possible  to  per- 
ceive it. 

95<De.  As  they  are  not  deceitful,  their  Hell  is  not  so 
grievous. 

957.  They  who  in  the  life  of  the  body  have  contracted 
the  nature  of  saying  one  thing  and  thinking  another  .  .  . 
wander  about  .  .  .  being  driven  away  with  x^enalties  .  .  . 
according  to  the  nature  of  the  deceitful  simulation  which 
they  have  contracted.  Des. 

958e.  Whoever  is  let  into  this  cone  .  .  .  has  all  his 
joints  miserably  torn  :  it  is  deceitful  dissemblers  who 
are  let  into  it  and  so  punished. 

960.  There  are  certain  deceitful  Spirits,  who,  while 
they  lived  in  the  body,  had  practised  deceits  covertly  ; 
and  some  of  whom  by  baleful  arts  had  pretended  to  be 
like  Angels,  with  a  view  to  entrap  people.  In  the  other 
life,  they  learn  how  to  withdraw  into  subtler  nature, 
and  to  snatch  themselves  away  from  the  sight  of  others, 
supposing  themselves  thus  to  be  safe  from  every  penalty. 
But  these  not  only  undergo  the  penalties  of  rending,  as 
the  others  do,  according  to  the  nature  and  wickedness  of 
their  deceit,  but  are  also  stuck  together  ;  and  when  this 
is  done,  the  more  they  want  to  be  loosed  .  .  .  the  more 
closely  are  they  tied.  This  penalty  is  attended  with  a 
more  intense  torture,  because  this  answers  to  their  more 
hidden  deceits. 


10942.  They  had  attended  the  Church  and  the  sacra- 
ments like  other  people  ;  as  had  also  the  deceitful,  and 
these  in  fact  more  than  other  people. 

m8e.  (With  the  men  of  the  Most  Ancient  Church), 
simulation,  and  still  more  deceit,  was  an  enormous  crime. 

1  i82e.  The  more  love  of  the  world  and  of  self  there  is 
in  that  external  worship,  the  less  life  and  holiness  there 
are  in  his  worship  ;  the  more  hatred  towards  the  neigh- 
bour there  is  in  the  love  of  self  and  the  world,  the  more 
profanity  there  is  in  the  worship  ;  the  more  malice  there 
is  in  the  hatred,  the  more  profanity  still  there  is  in  the 
worship  ;  and  the  more  deceit  there  is  in  the  malice,  the 
more  profanity  still  there  is  in  the  worship. 

1 27 1.  There  were  afterwards  some  deceitful  Spirits 
who  wanted  to  emerge,  and  infused  into  them  to  say 
that  they  were  nothing  .  .  .  wherefore  some  were  per- 
mitted to  rise  up  .  .  .  They  supposed  that  they  could  do 
everything  .  .  .  but  they  were  thrust  down  again  by  a 
little  child  .  .  .  The  deceitful  also  were  punished,  being 
first  almost  suffocated  by  the  others,  and  afterwards 
stuck  together,  to  cause  them  to  desist  from  such  things  ; 
but  they  were  afterwards  liberated. 

1273.  If  (the  novitiate  Spirit)  is  a  dissembler,  a 
hypocrite,  or  is  deceitful  ...  he  is  sometimes  received 
by  good  Spirits,  but  after  a  short  time  is  dissociated,  and 
then  wanders  about  without  Augels,  begging  to  be  re- 
ceived, and  is  sometimes  punished  ;  and  at  last  is  carried 
down  among  the  infernals. 

1380.  They  who  have  been  deceitful  often  appear 
above  the  head  ;  yet  are  really  in  Hell  under  foot. 
2754-  375°- 

1395.  (As  to  this  kind  of  perception),  I  have  often 
listened  while  the  deceitful  Mere  speaking,  and  have 
perceived  not  only  that  there  was  deceit,  but  also  the 
nature  of  the  deceit,  and  what  wickedness  there  was  in 
the  deceit :  it  is  as  though  there  were  an  image  of  the 
deceit  in  each  tone  of  the  voice.  I  could  also  perceive 
whether  the  deceit  was  the  speaker's  own,  or  was  that 
of  others  who  spoke  through  him. 

16402.  Of  what  genius  and  nature  Spirits  are,  mani- 
festly appears  from  their  speech,  as  well  as  from  their 
sphere  ...  So  that  if  they  are  deceitful,  although  at 
the  moment  of  speaking  they  use  no  deceit,  still  the 
genus  and  species  of  their  deceit  are  perceived  from  each 
word  and  idea  .  .  . 

1 69 1.  All  hatreds  come  forth  from  the  love  of  self  and 
of  the  world  ;  from  hatreds  all  revenges  and  cruelties  ; 
from  the  former  and  the  latter  all  deceits. 

1695.  Still,  licence  is  not  granted  to  (evil  Spirits)  to 
think  and  speak  what  is  false,  except  that  which  is  from 
their  evil  ;  but  not  that  which  is  contrary  to  their  own 
proper  evil ;  for  this  is  deceit. 

17023.  (It  is  in  consequence  of  possessing  an  interior 
man  that  deceit  is  possible  to  man.) 

18202.  Those  (evil  Genii)  who  are  malignant  and 
deceitful,  insinuate  themselves  into  the  very  loves  .  .  . 

1861.  See  Cupidity  at  this  ref. 

22193.  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  from  self-love  spring 
...  all  infamous  simulations  and  deceits  .  .  . 


Deceit 


38 


Deceit 


[A.]  2269e.  In  the  deceitful  and  in  hypocrites  (good 
and  evil)  are  not  far  from  being  conjoined,  but  still  the 
Lord  takes  care  that  they  are  not  conjoined  ;  which  is  the 
reason  why  in  the  other  life  the  deceitful  and  hypocrites 
undergo  the  most  direful  sufferings  of  all. 

2426e.  It  is  the  deceitful  and  the  hypocrites  within 
the  Church  who  are  the  most  exposed  to  this  danger  (of 
mixing  evil  with  good).  Sig. 

2492-.  With  those  who  have  been  deceitful  and 
hypocrites,  this  (callosity  of  the  exterior  memory) 
appears  as  it  were  bony  and  of  ebony,  and  reflects  the 
rays  of  light.     H.466. 

2590.  Such  (Gentiles)  ...  do  not  contrive  machina- 
tions and  deceits. 

2754.  See  Christian  at  this  ref. 

3934s-  Something  counterfeit,  such  as  there  is  in 
hypocrisy  and  deceit  .  .  . 

3957s.  He  who  has  acquired  a  life  of  deceit,  and 
therein  has  had  the  delight  of  his  life,  cannot  put  it  off, 
but  is  also  in  that  life  after  death. 

399312-  Simulation  and  cunning  which  have  evil  as 
their  end,  are  not  prudence,  but  are  cunning  and  deceit, 
with  which  good  cannot  be  at  all  conjoined  ;  for  the 
deceit  which  is  the  end  of  evil  induces  what  is  infernal 
on  each  and  all  things  with  man,  and  sets  evil  in  the 
middle,  and  rejects  good  to  the  circumferences,  which 
order  is  the  infernal  order  itself. 

4327-  By  this  was  signified  that  the  fibres  of  the 
cerebrum  have  intruded  themselves,  and  exercise  com- 
mand over  those  of  the  cerebellum,  and  that  thence 
what  is  fictitious,  simulated,  counterfeited,  and  deceit- 
ful reigns  within,  and  outwardly  appears  as  what  is 
sincere  and  good. 

"•  They  who  at  this  day  relate  to  (the  general 

involuntary  sense)  are  they  who  think  deceitfully  .  .  . 
putting  on  a  most  friendly  expression  .  .  .  and  speak- 
ing sweetly  like  those  who  are  pre-eminently  endowed 
with  charity  ;  yet  being  the  most  bitter  enemies  .  .  . 

4464=.  The  sphere  of  one  who  is  in  pleasures  from 
deceits,  etc.  .  . 

4533-  When  they  are  looked  into  by  the  Angels  .  .  . 
the  deceitful  appear  as  serpents,  and  the  most  deceitful 
as  vipers. 

4631.  See  Assassin  at  this  ref. 

4663%  He  who  in  the  life  of  the  body  has  practised 
deceits  against  his  companions,  also  practises  deceits 
against  his  companions  in  the  other  life. 

5058.  There  was  one  who  in  the  world  had  been 
[accounted]  among  the  more  worthy  ;  he  was  then 
known  to  me,  but  not  his  inward  character  ;  but,  in  the 
other  life,  after  some  revolutions  of  the  state  of  his  life, 
he  was  shown  to  have  been  deceitful.  When  he  had 
been  for  some  time  among  the  deceitful  in  the  other 
life,  and  had  there  suffered  hard  things,  he  wanted  to 
be  separated  from  them.  .  .  He  was  admitted  into  a 
Society  consisting  of  the  simple  good  .  .  .  but  he  at 
once  began  to  carry  on  his  life  by  cunning  and  deceit. 
Within  an  hour,  the  good  began  to  lament  that  he  had 
taken  from  them  their  perception  of  good  and  truth, 


and  consequently  their  delight  .  .  .  Some  light  from  the 
interior  Heaven  was  then  admitted,  in  which  he  appeared 
as  a  devil  and  having  the  upper  part  of  his  nose 
furrowed  with  a  filthy  wound.  He  also  began  to  be 
inwardly  tortured  ;  and  as  soon  as  he  felt  it  he  cast 
himself  into  Hell. 

5 1 28s.  There  are  two  things  which  not  only  close  up 
the  way  of  communication  (with  the  Rational),  but  also 
deprive  the  man  of  the  capacity  of  ever  becoming 
rational ;  these  are  deceit  and  profanation.  Deceit  is 
like  a  subtle  poison  which  infects  the  interiors,  and 
profanation  is  that  which  commingles  falsities  with 
truths,  and  evils  with  goods  ;  by  these  two  the  Rational 
utterly  perishes.  With  every  man  there  are  goods  and 
truths  stored  up  by  the  Lord  from  infancy  .  .  .  Deceit 
infects  these,  and  profanation  commingles  them. 

5394e.  A  cadaverous  stench  also  exhaled  from  the 
caverns  ;  the  reason  was,  that  the  cruel  and  deceitful 
were  therein,  to  whom  a  cadaverous  stench  is  most 
delightful. 

5559e.  With  those  who  have  been  deceitful,  these 
outermost  things  (in  the  cuticles)  appear  as  if  they  were 
conglutinations  of  mere  serpents. 

56087.   '  Vipers '  =  those  who  are  the  most  deceitful. 

5989.  The  most  deceitful,  who  are  above  the  head, 
once  took  a  Subject  and  sent  him  to  me,  in  order  that 
they  might  be  able  to  flow  in  with  their  deceits  ;  but 
...  he  extricated  himself  from  them.  They  afterwards 
took  another,  but  could  not  reduce  him  to  speak  ;  he 
was  more  deceitful  than  they,  which  he  showed  by  as  it 
were  folding  himself  up  into  the  form  of  a  spiral .  .  . 
D.4097.  4098. 

6197.  The  deceitful  who  appear  right  over  head, 
have  sometimes  flowed  into  me  so  subtly  that  I  did  not 
know  whence  it  was,  and  could  scarcely  perceive  other- 
wise than  that  that  which  flowed  in  was  in  me  and  from 
me,  as  is  usually  the  case  with  others  ;  but  as  I  knew 
for  certain  that  it  was  from  some  other  source,  the  Lord 
gave  me  a  perception  so  exquisite,  that  I  perceived  each 
influx  of  them  .  .  .  When  they  observed  this,  they  were 
very  indignant,  especially  that  I  should  reflect  upon 
that  which  was  from  them  .  .  .  The  deceitful  chiefly 
insinuated  such  things  as  are  against  the  Lord. 

6398e.  Malice,  cunning,  and  deceit  are  signified  by 
'serpents,'  but  by  venomous  ones,  as  'vipers,'  and  the 
like  ;  of  which  reasoning  is  the  poison. 

69 142.  Even  at  this  day  some  who  are  more  deceitful 
than  others  .  .  .  are  under  the  view  of  the  celestial 
(Angels),  and,  so  long  as  they  are  so,  are  withheld  from 
their  wicked  deceits. 

7272s.  From  these  principles  he  lives  in  .  .  .  in  deceit, 

etc.  .  . 

736oe.  (The  inhabitants  of  Mars)  do  not  know  what 
hypocrisy  is,  nor  fraudulent  simulation  and  deceit. 

8622e.  Inwardly,  they  were  deceitful  tigers. 

S8702.  Such  are  dissemblers,  hypocrites,  and  the 
deceitful :  these  are  they  who  make  an  image  of  the 
things  which  are  from  the  Divine.  In  the  other  life, 
evil  Spirits  make  such  images  .  .  .  dissemblers,  hypocrites, 
and  the  deceitful  there  learn  this  .  .  . 


Deceit 


39 


Deceit 


9013.  'To  slay  him  with  guile'  (Ex.xxi.  14)  =  malice 
thence  to  deprive  the  neighbour  of  eternal  life.  .  .  'Guile' 
=  malice  from  the  will  with  previous  thought  or  pre- 
meditation, thus  of  set  purpose.  Evils  are  done  either 
from  enmity,  hatred,  or  revenge,  and  either  with  deceit 
or  without  deceit ;  but  the  evils  done  by  deceit  are  the 
worst,  because  deceit  is  like  poison  which  infects  and 
destroys  with  infernal  corruption  and  wasting  away  ; 
for  it  goes  through  the  whole  mind,  even  to  its  interiors  : 
the  reason  is,  that  he  who  is  in  deceit  meditates  on 
evil,  and  therewith  nourishes  his  understanding  and 
delights  it,  and  so  destroys  everything  therein  which 
belongs  to  man,  that  is,  which  is  of  life  from  the  good 
of  faith  and  of  charity.  They  who  in  the  world  have 
with  deceit  ensnared  the  neighbour  as  to  worldly  and 
earthly  things,  in  the  other  life  with  deceit  ensnare  the 
neighbour  as  to  spiritual  and  celestial  things  ;  and  as 
they  do  this  in  covert  they  are  relegated  to  the  Hells 
behind  the  back,  deep  down  according  to  the  malignity 
and  hurtfulness  of  the  deceit.  These  are  called  .  .  . 
Genii.  .  .  When  they  are  looked  at  by  the  Angels,  they 
appear  as  serpents,  for  their  nature  is  that  of  serpents, 
and  that  which  comes  from  them  is  like  poison,  and 
also  is  spiritual  poison  ;  wherefore  'poison,'  in  the  Word, 
= deceit ;  and  poisonous  serpents,  like  asps,  cockatrices, 
and  '  vipers, '  —  the  deceitful.  111. 

4.  Deceit  is  called  hypocrisy  when  there  is  piety 

in  the  mouth  and  impiety  in  the  heart,  or  when  there 
is  charity  in  the  mouth  and  hatred  in  the  heart,  or  when 
there  is  innocence  in  the  face  and  gesture,  but  cruelty 
in  the  soul  and  breast,  consequently  when  men  deceive- 
fallunt-by  innocence,  charity,  and  piety ;  such  are 
serpents  and  vipers,  in  the  internal  sense,  because  .  .  . 
in  the  light  of  Heaven  those  appear  as  serpents  and 
vipers  who  conceal  evils  under  truths,  that  is,  who 
deceitfully  bend  truths  to  the  doing  of  evil,  for  they  as 
it  were  hide  poison  under  their  teeth,  and  so  kill.  But 
they  who  are  in  the  faith  of  truth  and  the  good  of  life 
from  the  Lord  cannot  be  injured  by  their  poisons, 
because  they  are  in  light  from  the  Lord,  in  which  the 
deceitful  appear  as  serpents,  and  their  deceits  as 
poisons.  Sig. 

6.  They  who  are  interiorly  affected  with  spiritual 

deceit,  that  is,  hypocrisy,  are  meant  by  those  who  speak 
against  the  Holy  Spirit,  for  whom  there  is  no  forgiveness 
.  .  .  for  thus  falsity  lies  hidden  in  the  truths  they  speak, 
and  evil  in  the  goods  they  do,  which  is  hidden  poison  ; 
whence  they  are  called  '  a  generation  of  vipers "...  The 
reason  there  is  no  forgiveness  for  them,  is  that  hypocrisy 
or  deceit  in  connection  with  holy  things  infects  the 
interiors  of  man,  and  destroys  all  spiritual  life  with  him, 
so  that  at  last  there  is  nothing  sound  anywhere  .  .  . 
Such,  also,  are  meant  by  the  man  who  had  not  on  a 
wedding  garment. 

9.   'Deceit,' in  the  Word,  =  hypocrisy.  111. 

H.  4813.  The  interiors  of  those  who  .  .  .  have  inwardly 
heen  in  malignant,  deceit  (appear  dimly  fiery). 

488s.  They  whose  delight  it  has  been  .  .  .  covertly  to 
plot  deceits,  are  also  in  these  vaults,  and  enter  into 
chambers  so  dark  that  they  cannot  even  see  one  another, 
and  there  they  whisper  in  corners  into  each  other's  ears  : 
into  this  is  turned  the  delight  of  their  love. 


49 12.  They  who  have  .  .  .  thus  filled  their  malignity 
with  deceits,  and  have  used  goodness  as  a  means  of 
deceit,  are  at  once  cast  into  Hell :  I  have  seen  some 
such  cast  into  Hell  immediately  after  death  ;  one  most 
deceitful  person  head  downwards  and  feet  upwards  ; 
and  others  differently. 

578.  The  worst  of  all  are  they  who  have  been  in  evils 
from  self-love,  and  have  at  the  same  time  inwardly 
acted  from  deceit,  for  deceit  enters  more  intimately 
into  the  thoughts  and  intentions,  and  infects  them  with 
poison,  and  thus  destroys  the  whole  spiritual  life  of  man. 
Most  of  them  are  in  the  Hells  at  the  back,  and  are 
called  Genii,  and  there  it  is  their  delight  to  make 
themselves  invisible  and  fly  about  others  like  phantoms, 
and  covertly  introduce  evils,  which  they  scatter  about 
as  vipers  do  poison.  These  are  more  direfully  tormented 
than  any.  But  they  who  have  not  been  deceitful .  .  . 
yet  are  in  evils  from  self-love,  are  also  in  the  Hells  at 
the  back,  but  not  in  such  deep  ones. 

579.  See  Genii  at  this  ref. 

Life  81.  See  Cunning  at  these  refs.     D.5692. 

R.  624.  'And  in  their  mouth  was  found  no  guile' 
(Rev.xiv.5)- -that  they  do  not  from  cunning  and  purpose 
speak  and  persuade  to  falsity  and  evil.  .  .  '  Guile '  = 
persuasion  to  evil  by  means  of  falsity  ;  properly,  from 
cunning  and  purpose.  For  he  who  persuades  to  any- 
thing from  cunning  or  deceit  persuades  from  purpose 
also  ;  for  cunning  or  deceit  purposes  to  itself,  conceals 
its  purpose,  and  effects  it  when  there  is  an  opportunity. 
'A  lie,'  in  the  Word,  =  falsity  and  false  speaking,  and 
1  deceit' =  each  from  purpose.  111. 

e.  The  deceitful  are  signified  in  the  Word  by 

poisonous  serpents,  as  by  'crocodiles'  and  'vipers  ;'  and 
the  deceit  is  signified  by  their  'poison.' 

M.  793.  Their  deceit  and  cunning  are  represented  by 
the  crocodiles  (we  saw). 

513.  The  lust  of  seducing  innocencies  .  .  .  prevails 
especially  with  the  deceitful.  Des.     D.  1070. 

5143.  If  they  had  allured  by  deceit,  they  are  carried 
down  ...  to  the  Hell  of  the  deceitful,  which  is  in  the 
western  quarter  deep  down  at  the  back,  and  there  they 
appear  as  serpents  of  various  kinds,  and  the  most 
deceitful  as  vipers  .  .  Presently,  as  they  sit  or  stand, 
they  make  themselves  invisible,  and  fly  about  in  the 
cavern  like  phantoms  .  .  .  and  after  flying  they  rest 
themselves ;  and  then,  wonderful  to  say,  one  does  not 
know  another ;  the  reason  of  which  is  that  they  are  in 
deceit,  and  deceit  does  not  believe  another,  and  there- 
fore withdraws  itself. 

T.  32ie.  In  the  widest  natural  sense  (the  eighth  com- 
mandment) includes  plots,  deceits,  and  evils  of  purpose 
against  anyone  .  .  . 

322.  This  falsity  is  meant  in  the  Word  by  'a  lie;' 
and  the  purpose  by  'deceit.'  111. 

324.  They  who  speak  falsities  from  deceit  or  purpose, 
and  utter  them  in  a  tone  imitative  of  spiritual  affection, 
and  especially  if  they  mingle  with  them  truths  from  the 
Word  .  .  .  were  called  by  the  ancients  enchanters,  and 
also  pythons  and  serpents  of  the  tree  of  knowledge  of 
good  and  evil.     (Described  by  comparisons.) 


Deceit 


40 


Deceit 


D.  127  (Index).  The  Spirits  who  say  there  is  one 
Creator  of  the  universe,  and  are  unwilling  to  acknowledge 
the  Lord,  are  evil  and  deceitful  in  proportion  as  they 
recede  from  the  acknowledgment  of  the  Lord. 

132  (Index).  Certain  Spirits  are  most  deceitful ; 
Sirens  are. 

191.  There  are  deceitful  Spirits  who  can  put  on  the 
appearance  of  Angels  ;  but  they  are  the  worst  .  .  . 

225.  Some  of  (the  worst  Genii,  or  furies)  infested  me 
so  deceitfully  and  acutely  that  I  could  never  have 
believed  it  possible  for  such  poisons  to  exist .  .  . 

284.  They  sought  for  innocencies  with  all  deceit  and 
diligence. 

287.  The  lowest  infernal  crew  consists  of  those  who 
act  the  most  deceitfully  .  .  . 

480.  The  worst  Spirits  are  those  who  have  been  called 
Christians  .  .  .  They  are  most  deceitful,  and  contrive 
such  deceits  together  against  the  Lord  .  .  .  and  against 
the  faithful  (as  to  excite  astonishment). 

535.  They  know  that  (the  Spirits  of  our  Earth)  are 
cunning  and  deceitful.     594. 

639.  I  was  told  that  (these  Spirits  who  are  very  high 
up  in  Heaven)  are  Genii,  whose  influx  is  malignant  and 
most  deceitful  .  .  . 

640.  On  the  way,  before  their  deceit  or  poison  came 
to  me,  it  was  taken  up  by  intermediate  Spirits,  and  so 
tempered. 

641.  There  are  Spirits  who  lie  concealed  ...  so  that 
their  phantasies,  and  their  deceitful  arts  and  wiles  do 
not  become  so  manifest  as  those  of  other  Spirits  :  they 
are  in  the  zenith  .  .  .  and  suppose  that  they  can  betake 
themselves  into  subtler  nature  ;  wherefore,  as  they  say, 
they  do  not  fear  anything.  But  still  their  deceits 
appear  manifestly  whenever  it  is  so  permitted  by  the 
Lord  .  .  .  They  insert  themselves  in  covert  into  the 
manifest  deceits  of  others. 

644.  The  Spirits  who  were  continually  plotting  deceits 
.  .  .  were  warned  by  others  to  desist,  but  they  confessed 
they  could  not,  even  if  they  were  to  die  ...     1247. 

865.  The  callosities  in  which  are  mixed  such  things 
as  savour  of  deceit .  .  .  cannot  be  so  easily  softened  and 
resolved  ;  wherefore  it  is  effected  by  the  punishment  of 
rending  asunder. 

909.  Such  dwell  near  the  place  where  are  the  worst 
infernal  deceitful  Spirits  .  .  .  for  deceits  are  manifold. 

929e.   Everything  sharp  =  deceit,  or  cunning. 

956.  No  one  can  judge  concerning  the  life  of  another 
from  (his  intellectual  abilities),  for  the  evil  can  be  more 
acute  .  .  .  than  the  good,  as  they  who  are  deceitful, 
yea,  the  most  deceitful,  and  robbers  .  .  . 

107 1.  On  the  punishment  of  a  certain  Spirit  who 
desired  to  do  everything  from  himself,  as  though  he 
were  alone,  being  at  the  same  time  deceitful. 

1 169.  This  deceitful  (way)  acquired  in  the  life  of  the 
body,  is  so  manifestly  obvious  to  the  Angels  .  .  .  that 
they  observe  it  in  every  word  he  says.     1824. 

1246.  (On  the  deceitful  in  the  dark  chamber.) 


1257.  On  a  certain  cunning  and  deceitful  Spirit ;  his 
life  ;  and  his  punishment  in  the  other  life. 

1354.  Such  Spirits  come  by  deceit  into  the  region  ol 
the  left  eye  .  .  .     (Their  punishment  described.) 

1356.  That  those  who  are  inwardly  deceitiwl-subdoli- 
are  unexpectedly  cast  out  of  Societies.  Des. 

1490.  The  more  interiorly  (these  revengeful  Spirits) 
can  enter  and  thus  pervert,  the  more  they  desire  to  do 
so,  and  that  with  various  deceits  .  .  . 

1808.  Sought  with  art  and  deceit  to  exercise  com- 
mand .  .  . 

1863.  On  those  who  in  their  lifetime  deceitfully  kill 
men. 

1992.  Some  turn  good  into  evil  from  deceit. 

1993.  There  are  three  general  causes  ...  by  which 
good  is  turned  into  evil,  namely,  from  deceit,  from  art. 
and  from  a  nature  which  has  been  contracted. 

1994.  Truth,  also,  is  turned  into  falsity,  either  from 
deceit  .  .  .  from  art  ...  or  from  nature  ...  as  is  the 
case  with  the  Gentiles,  who  are  much  more  easily  saved 
than  those  who  act  from  deceit  and  art. 

2046.  Their  state  can  be  known  from  the  sound  of 
their  voice,  as  .  .  .  whether  they  are  deceitful,  which  is 
manifested  in  the  speech  itself,  although  no  deceits  are 
perceived.  .  .  The  speech  of  the  deceitful  is  tacit,  there 
being  in  every  tone  an  image  of  the  deceit,  which  is 
Known  by  those  to  whom  the  Lord  gives  to  Know  it. 

2078.  "Wherefore  he  cannot  desist,  as  is  evident  from 
his  acting  deceitfully  under  the  pleasantness  of  another 
as  it  were  appropriated  to  himself. 

2346.  Such  are  they  who  are  the  worst,  who  entirely 
profane  holy  things,  and  are  nothing  but  hatreds 
attended  with  deceits.  In  the  other  life  these  cannot 
be  reformed  .  .  . 

2408.  Some  (personate  others)  in  order  to  contrive 
deceits  the  better. 

2492.  There  are  genera  and  species  of  those  who  are 
serpents,  or  of  those  who  in  the  life  of  the  body  have 
been  deceitful,  and  who  in  the  other  life  are  called 
serpents  .  .  .  for  the  Angels  see  their  interiors,  and  then 
their  deceits  appear  before  the  eyes  of  Spirits  as  creeping 
things  .  .  .  because  in  serpents  there  are  poisons,  by 
which  in  nature  are  represented  deceits. 

2494.  At  first,  I  supposed  that  they  were  good  Spirits, 
but  when  I  perceived  their  wiles  I  Knew  that  they 
were  deceitful,  for  whatever  wiles  they  were  able  to 
plot  and  at  once  carry  out,  they  applied  themselves  to. 

2495.  But  there  was  a  certain  kind  of  deceit  in  others, 
not  so  observable  .  .  .  Their  deceit  was  active  .  .  . 

2500.  Such  accustom  themselves  to  the  like  deceits. 
Enum. 

2503.  This  kind  of  deceit  may  be  called  the  deceit  of 
flatterers  .  .  .  being  thus  distinguished  into  genera,  and 
these  into  species. 

2525.  These  are  they  who  in  life  have  been  deceitful. 

2532.  Hence  it  may  be  evident  how  unhappy  those 
become  after  death  who  are  deceitful,  and  are  accustomed 
to  deceits  ;   for  deceits  are  what  occupy  this  interior 


Deceit 


41 


Deceit 


sphere  .  .  .  These  are  tormented  much  longer  .  .  .  for 
before  the  deceits  which  have  entered  their  natural 
disposition  .  .  .  are  extirpated,  there  is  a  long  time  of 
torment .  .  . 

2762.  In  those  who  are  deceitful,  when  they  are 
looked  at  by  Angels,  there  appear  as  it  were  other 
confluxes  of  serpents  of  various  kinds,  according  to  the 
nature  of  the  deceit. 

2848.  On  the  deceitful. 

.  Spirits  who  are  deceitful  are  not  permitted  to 

be  in  the  World  of  Spirits,  unless  their  poisons  are  taken 
away,  or  are  tempered,  so  that  they  cannot  injure  any- 
one. Many,  indeed,  are  to  be  preserved-reseruajjt/i-who 
do  what  is  evil  from  a  nature  as  it  were  like  this,  and 
that  deceitfully,  too,  but  who  yet  do  so  from  natural 
instinct.  It  is  they  who  occasion  evil  with  premeditation, 
who  hide  their  poisons,  and  thus  do  so  deceitfully,  who 
are  not  tolerated.  A  distinction  is  to  be  drawn  between 
deceit  as  an  instinct,  and  premeditated  deceit. 

2855.  On  the  Hell  of  those  who  act  from  premeditated 
deceit,  and  who  have  put  on  such  a  nature. 

.  Spirits  were  shown  me  who  were  accustomed  to 

deceive-decipere-men  with  acute  deceit,  putting  on  an 
agreeable  face  and  address,  and  concealing  poisonous 
deceits  within  .  .  .  They  were  permitted  to  come  into 
view,  and  to  contrive  their  deceitful  arts  .  .  . 

2856.  I  was  told  that .  .  .  such  were  they  who  contrive 
subtle  deceits,  with  premeditation,  and  thus  deceive- 
decipiimt-mndev  the  guise  of  a  friendly  countenance, 
thinking  of  nothing  but  their  neighbour's  ruin  .  .  . 

2857.  Their  Hell  is  more  frightful  than  any  other, 
worse  than  that  of  murderers  from  hatred,  and  that  of 
those  who  act  without  premeditated  deceit  .  .  .  See 
A.  830,  above. 

2858.  Such  are  not  like  those  who  are  deceitful  by 
nature,  and  who  make  prudence  to  consist  therein  ;  for 
when  these  are  present  the  fact  is  at  once  known  both 
from  their  wanting  to  speak  into  the  ear,  and  tacitly, 
and  also  from  the  sound  of  their  speech  .  .  .  Such  deceit- 
ful ones  do  not  receive  so  frightful  a  Hell,  but  a  different 
one .  .  . 

2876.  A  discourse  with  a  certain  deceitful  Spirit. 

.  He  said    that   he   could   deceive-dectpere-the 

devil,  so  artfully  did  he  insinuate  his  deceits  ;  insisting 
that  as  all  derive  their  life  from  the  Lord  .  .  .  the  Lord 
led  him  to  deceits  .  .  . 

2936.  That  the  deceitful  send  Subjects,  through 
whom  they  perform  their  deceits,  so  that  they  them- 
selves may  lie  hidden. 

.  (The  nature  of  the  deceitful  shown.) 

2963.  Sirens  are  they  who  insinuate  themselves  into 
the  cupidities  ...  in  such  a  manner  .  .  .  that  they 
(themselves)  are  unaware  that  evil  or  deceit  is  beneath 
.  .  .  But  they  who,  when  they  insinuate  themselves, 
meditate  concerning  deceits  .  .  .  are  not  Sirens,  but  are 
the  deceitful. 

3080.  If  Heaven  merely  looks  at  a  deceitful  one,  he 
is  turned  into  a  ball  of  serpents. 

3186.  On  those  who  do  not  care  for  interior  things; 
the  deceitful. 


.  Some  of  them,  who  were  more  deceitful,  in- 
sinuated themselves deceitfully-6it6cZo^e-into  the  company 
of  angelic  Spirits  ...  as  was  perceived  from  a  kind  of 
inanimate  snowiness  being  perceived  around  .  .  . 

3206.  (In  Gehenna)  are  the  most  deceitful,  especially 
Sirens,  who  enter  into  the  dispositions  of  others  by  an 
appearance  of  piety,  and  most  deceitfully  delude  and 
seduce  .  .  . 

3214.  On  a  deceitful  murderer. 

.  There  exhaled  from  him  so  much  subtle  poison, 

that  it  excited  the  deceitful  and  the  more  deceitful 
Sirens,  who  so  scattered  and  exercised  their  poisonous 
deceits,  that  it  cannot  be  described. 

32i5e.  Then  the  deceitful  murderer  appeared  like  an 
inanimate  mass,  thus  representing  himself  out  of  deceit ; 
and  then  perhaps  pouring  round  his  deceits  like  poisons . .  . 

3457.  There  were  above  the  head  those  who  act  with 
clandestine  deceit .  .  .  they  at  once  acted  from  then- 
nature  .  .  . 

3601.  Such  deceitful  ones,  who  persuade  to  pity  .  .  . 
keep  themselves  under  the  occiput .  .  . 

3605J.  On  the  quality  of  the  phantasies  of  those  who 
are  deceitful  Genii. 

3638.  The  deceitful  are  pre-eminently  in  such  (interior) 
thought  .  .  . 

3640e.  (The  evil  who  are  in  the  interior  sphere)  are 
entirely  removed  from  the  deceitful,  and  still  more  from 
the  most  deceitful,  so  that  they  cannot  communicate  .  .  . 

3647.  There  was  a  certain  one  among  the  deceitful  or 
the  Sirens  above  the  head.  That  he  was  a  new  one, 
was  observed  from  the  nature  of  his  deceit,  which  was 
greater  and  more  intense  than  their  deceit  ...  I  thus 
Knew  that  a  new  deceitful  one  was  in  their  company 
.  .  .  He  had  been  a  Pontiff  .  .  . 

3663.  They  are  more  deceitful  than  others,  and  by 
such  are  the  Pontiffs  ruled  as  soon  as  they  are  made 
Pontiffs. 

3664.  These  are  they  who  rule  the  Spirits  above 
spoken  of  as  being  more  deceitful  than  others  .  .  . 

3684.  This  was  confirmed  by  the  deceitful  above  the 
head,  who  said  that  they  could  treat  him  like  a  dog. 

3712.  Such,  above  all  others,  desire  to  come  into  the 
world  through  others,  because  they  are  most  deceitful .  . . 

3713.  They  do  not  manifest  their  deceit .  .  . 

3780.  It  was  observed  that  (the  Quakers)  are  not  so 
deceitful  as  others,  but  that  there  is  a  kind  of  secret 
deceit .  .  . 

3793.  The  deceit  (of  the  Quakers)  was  found  to  consist 
in  this,  that  they  dare  not  publish  their  thoughts  .  .  . 
wherefore  they  are  deceitful  in  covert,  their  nature 
drawing  them  back  .  .  .  This  kind  of  deceit  differs  from 
all  others. 

3838.  There  was  a  subtle  Spirit  with  me  who  was  a 
Subject  of  the  deceitful  above  the  head  .  .  .  and  who 
believed  himself  to  be  the  Holy  Spirit .  .  . 

3841.  Those  above  the  head,  the  deceitful  among  the 
more  deceitful,  who  suppose  themselves  to  be  the  Holy 
Spirit  .  .  .  actuated  him  .  .  .     3843°. 


Deceit 


42 


Deceit 


[D.]  3847.  As  the  deceitful  who  are  above  the  head  are 
devoid  of  conscience  .  .  .  they  wanted  to  induce  upon 
me  that  what  is  indifferent  ought  to  be  a  matter  of 
conscience  .  .  . 

3849.  Yet,  inwardly,  they  are  wolves,  as  are  the 
deceitful  who  are  above  the  head. 

3851.  As  I  lay  in  bed,  the  deceitful  Spirits  above  the 
head  formed  a  design  to  destroy  me  .  .  . 

3923e-  They  are  not  only  malignities,  but  are  also 
filthily  deceitful,  thus  wanting  to  plot  their  deceits 
through  the  innocent.     3924°. 

3925.  Through  the  noble  offspring  of  the  Most  Ancient 
Church,  the  Lord  rules  those  most  deceitful  ones  of  all, 
who  are  the  highest  up  above  the  head.     e. 

3926.  On  the  most  deceitful  above  the  head. 

.  The  most  deceitful   above  the  head  plotted 

nefarious  deceits  .  .  .  When  it  was  detected,  they  sent 
those  deceitful  ones  whom  they  lead  .  .  . 

3927.  They  are  punished  by  grievous  punishments  of 
doubling  up  .  .  .  being  reduced  into  a  very  gross  state 
.  .  .  even  contrary  to  their  deceits  ;  and  then  they  are 
also  doubled  up,  or  by  doublings  up  they  are  broken  and 
torn  as  to  all  their  members  from  the  breast  in  succession 
to  the  feet .  .  .  Their  heads  are  hard  and  bony,  and,  if 
thus  treated,  would  be  broken  .  .  . 

3933.  The  deceitful  and  the  most  deceitful  are  in 
general  such  that  they  take  hardly  anything  from  man's 
ideas  but  what  is  innocent  and  heavenly,  and  thereby 
lay  an  ambush  for  him,  turning  it  by  various  methods 
to  destroy  the  man  .  .  . 

3968.  Those  most  deceitful  Spirits  were  then  seen 
(acting)  not  by  bodily  circumflexions,  but  by  borings 
.  .  .  and  by  spiral  turnings,  and  it  was  said  that  such 
are  the  worst,  because  they  act  so  deceitfully  in  order 
to  extricate  themselves  from  the  societies  of  others  .  .  . 
As,  however,  they  are  devoid  of  persuasion,  and  act 
solely  from  phantasy,  they  could  be  tolerated  in  the 
World  of  Spirits  ;  still,  they  are  cadaverous. 

3978.  On  the  most  deceitful. 

.  There  were   some  who,  in  the  middle  of  the 

night,  when  I  suddenly  awoke,  assaulted  me  with  such 
subtle  deceit  that  it  cannot  be  described.  It  was 
scarcely  observed  by  the  angelic  Spirits  .  .  . 

3997.  They  who  are  highest  above  the  head  .  .  .  who 
flow  into  the  lower  deceitful  ones,  while  I  was  writing, 
inflicted  a  pain  in  the  region  of  the  abdomen,  which  was 
their  own  anguish  .  .  .  because  they  did  not  want  to  be 
exposed,  or  written  about.  I  spoke  to  them,  and  per- 
ceived that  they  could  insinuate  themselves  into  my 
affections  and  excite  my  pity  .  .  . 

4020.  Both  the  deceitful  and  the  most  deceitful  above 
the  head  joined  themselves  to  (the  Sirens),  and  flowed 
in  through  them  .  .  .  and  when  they  were  told  that  they 
should  desist,  because  if  they  persevered  they  would  be 
reduced  into  a  miserable  state,  they  said  that  they  could 
not  possibly  desist. 

4039.  The  evil  who  in  the  life  of  the  body  have  been 
but  little  deceitful,  in  the  other  life  become  very 
deceitful. 


4041.  The  deceitful  Spirits  above  the  head,  by  mere 
thought  and  the  leading  of  it,  led  the  Spirits  above  me 
to  speak  .  .  .  This  was  shown  by  others,  who  led  the 
deceitful,  too,  to  speak  .  .  . 

4057.  I  wondered  that  the  deceitful,  Sirens,  etc.,  were 
possessed  of  such  knowledge  in  infusing  and  doing  evil 
...  I  knew  that  in  the  life  of  the  body  they  knew 
nothing  of  the  kind  ;  as,  for  instance,  that  the  deceitful 
should  flow  in  most  deceitfully  into  all  things  of  thought 
and  affection,  and  pervert  them  .  .  .  But  in  proportion 
as  anyone  is  in  the  life  of  cupidities,  he  is  in  the  know- 
ledge of  those  things  which  belong  to  the  cupidities  ; 
hence,  in  the  other  life,  come  such  deceits  and  malig- 
nities. 

4067.  When  the  most  deceitful  above  the  head  .  .  . 
wanted  to  destroy  me,  they  said  that  they  could  not, 
because  there  is  nothing  (of  me);  but  if  there  were  any- 
thing, they  could  do  it.  .  .  To  be  anything,  as  anything 
of  proprium,  would  be  to  be  what  they  can  attack  and 
destroy  ...  as  the  most  deceitful  would  then  have  it 
within  their  rights  .  .  .  Thus  is  he  safe,  who,  in  the 
truth  of  faith,  believes  himself  to  be  nothing. 

4068.  When  (the  noble  offspring  of  the  Most  Ancient 
Church)  spoke  with  me,  the  most  deceitful  who  were 
highest  up  above  the  head  fell  down  over  my  head,  and 
gravitated  upon  the  head  so  heavily  that  I  felt  it  like 
a  weight,  insomuch  that  if  they  had  not  been  directly 
over  my  head,  [they  would  have  sunk]  into  the  deep  .  .  . 

4069.  The  noble  offspring  of  the  Most  Ancient  Church 
said  that  it  was  given  them  to  rule  the  most  deceitful, 
and  that  when  they  took  from  them  their  lofty  disposi- 
tion or  pride,  which  holds  them  in  their  highest  station, 
they  fell  down  .  .  .  and  then  the  most  deceitful  could 
not  open  their  mouths. 

4085.  Such  are  in  Hell  .  .  .  in  the  filthiest  excrements; 
and  are  vastated  to  the  very  bones,  because  they  are 
most  deceitful  .  .  . 

4086.  Certain  evil  and  deceitful  Spirits  are  really  in 
Hell,  although  they  appear  in  the  World  of  Spirits,  as, 
for  instance,  the  most  deceitful  above  the  head  are  in 
Hell  under  the  buttocks  ...  So  with  others  who  are  in 
Gehenna  .  .  .  when  the  phantasy  of  magic  and  deceit 
comes  on  them,  they  seem  to  be  elsewhere  .  .  . 

4097.  The  deceitful  above  the  head  knew  how  to  take 
to  themselves  (female)  Subjects  from  those  who  are  above 
the  head,  whom  others  had  not  observed  to  be  present 
.  .  .     4098. 

4098s.  While  the  deceitful  remained  above  the  head 
(this  Siren)  could  turn  them  into  monsters  .  .  .  wherefore 
they  were  not  permitted  to  have  such  a  one  for  a  Subject. 

4101.  On  the  most  deceitful. 

.  It  is  amazing  that  the  most  deceitful  above  the 

head,  who  have  been  Pontiffs  and  the  like,  as  soon  as 
anything  innocent  appears,  cannot  desist  from  seizing 
it  as  a  means  for  laying  an  ambush.  Examp. 

4352.  On  hypocrites  and  the  deceitful. 

.  Spirits  clearly  showed  that  hypocrites  and  the 

deceitful  are  much  more  foolish  and  senseless  than 
others  who  openly  speak  what  is  right  and  true  .  .  . 
(Bergenstierna)   supposed   himself  to   have   been    very 


Deceit 


43 


Deceive 


prudent  and  wise,  and  that  no  one  had  observed  him, 
whereas  all  could  observe  his  hypocrisy  and  deceit.  It 
is  granted  to  nearly  every  man  thus  to  see  that  there 
are  deceit  and  hypocrisy,  and  also  the  quality  of  the 
deceit  and  hypocrisy,  and  that,  too,  in  every  single 
thing  he  says.  This  dissociates  them  from  others,  and 
no  one  trusts  them,  because  all  are  aware  of  it  after 
slight  intercourse.  That  they  should  suppose  no  one 
can  see  and  know  this,  is  due  to  their  senselessness  ;  so 
that  they  apprehend  less  than  others.  All  the  deceitful 
are  of  this  character,  and  still  more  is  this  the  case  in 
the  other  life  .  .  . 

4370.  On  deceitful  and  evil  Spirits  who  desire  to  tor- 
ment innocent  little  children  .  .  . 

4424.  She  projected  herself  through  spiral  forms,  by 
which  is  signified  something  deceitful .  .  . 

4546.  To  the  right,  obliquely  in  front  (in  the  Hells) 
are  the  deceitful,  deeper  and  deeper  in  proportion  as 
they  are  more  deceitful. 

4583.  On  a  certain  most  wicked  one,  who  was  deceitful 
under  the  appearance  of  innocence  :  his  Hell. 

4589.  Hell.  On  those  who  inmostly  cherish  deceits 
against  the  neighbour,  and  outwardly  appear  sincere. 

46812.  (On  the  Jesuits.)  The  deceitful ...  are  at  the 
back  of  the  former,  and  appear  as  if  standing  .  .  .  They 
take  extreme  care  not  to  be  discovered  ;  when  discovered 
before  the  eyes  of  the  Angels  they  appear  like  con- 
glomerated serpents  .  .  .  They  reject  from  themselves 
.  .  .  those  who  are  not  deceitful .  .  .  They  cast  them- 
selves above  the  head  .  .  .  and  look  down  below,  plotting 
deceits  .  .  .  Their  deceits  cannot  be  described  .  .  . 

5 109.  The  deceitful  (are  vastated)  in  a  different  way, 
because  they  think  more  deeply  or  interiorly  than 
others  .  .  . 

5634s.  With  those  who  have  been  deceitful,  and  have 
burned  with  revenge  to  the  very  end  of  life,  and  have 
perceived  their  delight  therein,  there  is  nothing  whole 
remaining. 

6053.  Deceit  is  heinous  because  it  enters  into  the  in- 
teriors of  man,  even  into  the  Rational  .  .  .  and  there 
completely  closes  the  spiritual  mind. 

.  These  three  evils  (adultery,  the  love  of  exercising 

command,  and  deceit)  will  be  especially  shunned  by 
those  who  will  be  of  the  New  Jerusalem. 

Min.  4774.  On  revenge  attended  with  deceit. 

.  (The  archbishop  James  Beuzelius)  took  extreme 

delight  in  contriving  deceits  in  his  thought .  .  . 

.  Hence  it  is  evident  that  the  lust  of  doing  evil 

to  others  from  interior  deceit  leads  the  spirit  into  such 
cupidities  as  it  had  not  exercised  before,  or  as  it  had  not 
had  hereditarily  ...  so  that  the  life  which  is  the  interior 
life  is  diminished  ...  It  was  said  that  they  who  are  in 
the  lust  of  revenge,  and  at  the  same  time  in  deceit .  .  . 
appear  like  dried  up  skeletons. 

4786e.  When  (revengeful  devils)  speak,  there  is  heard 
as  it  were  a  silent  hiss  after  their  speech,  and  this  from 
interior  deceit. 

E.  32918.  'The  Lord  shall  redeem  their  soul  from 
deceit  and  violence'  (Ps.lxxii.  14)  =  deliverance  from  the 


evils  and  falsities  which  destroy  the  goods  of  love  and 
truths  of  faith. 

23_   cpjjg  man  0f  "bl00<js  and  deceits'  (Ps.v.6)  = 

those  who  are  in  falsities  from  evil. 

866.  'In  their  mouth  was  found  no  guile' =  that  they 
are  averse  to  think  and  to  persuade  falsities.  .  .  '  Guile ' 
=  to  deceive-^a^ere-and  seduce  from  purpose,  thus  from 
the  intention  which  is  of  the  will ;  and  thus  from  the 
mind  to  think  and  persuade  falsities,  which  destroy  man 
to  eternity. 

2.  What  else 'deceit' =  in  the  Word.  111. 

3.  'Deceit'  (Zeph.iii.  13)  =  falsity  not  from  ignor- 
ance of  truth,  but  from  the  deliberate  purpose  of  deceiving 
-fallendi,  as  is  the  case  with  the  wicked. 

*.   'Deceit'  (Ps.v.6)  =  this  from  purpose. 

.  The  lips  and  tongue,  with  which  they  speak  a 

lie  and  deceit  (Jer.ix.5,6)  =  thought  with  intention  to 
persuade  falsities  contrary  to  truths,  and  to  seduce. 

.   'Iniquity'  (Job xiii. 7)  =  regards  evil;    'deceit,' 

falsity  thence. 

.   In  these  places,  'deceit'  does  not  mean  deceit 

in  the  natural  sense,  in  which  it  means  fraudulent 
machination,  and  a  lie  from  malice  against  others  ;  but 
deceit  in  the  spiritual  sense,  in  which  'deceit'  is  thought 
from  the  intention  of  the  will,  that  is,  from  the  purpose 
or  deliberation  of  speaking  and  persuading  falsities  ;  and 
thus  a  mind  to  destroy. 

5.  This  done  from  purpose  is  meant  by  '  the  deceit 

of  their  heart'  (Jer.xiv.  14). 

6.  That  by  'deceit'  is  meant  the  falsification  of 

the  truths  of  the  Word  from  purpose,  and  also  from  the 
cupidity  of  seducing,  is  evident  from  Hosea  :  'Ephraim 
hath  encompassed  me  with  a  lie,  and  the  house  of  Israel 
with  deceit'  (xiii.  12)  .  .  .  Hence  'a  lie'  and  'deceit'  =  to 
persuade  falsities  from  purpose  and  cupidity. 

7.  From  this   it  is  evident  again  that  'deceit' 

means  deceit  in  the  spiritual  sense,  which  is  that  which 
is  against  the  truths  and  goods  of  the  Word  and  of  the 
Church,  thus  the  mind  and  cupidity  of  destroying  them. 

8.  The  reason  deceit  was  so  grievous  a  crime  is 

that  deliberation  and  purpose  are  of  the  will,  and  what- 
ever is  of  the  will  is  of  the  man  himself,  and  is  called 
the  evil  of  his  heart .  .  . 

9.  Hence  it  is  evident  that  'deceit'  in  general  =  all 

the  evil  of  intention  to  destroy  truths  through  falsities. 

e.  (Refs.  to  passages  on  the  subject  of  deceit.) 

9o8e.  'The  lip  of  a  lie,  and  the  tongue  of  deceit'  (Ps. 
cxx.  2)  =  falsities  from  evil. 

J. (Post.)  5.  In  England  .  .  .  there  is  no  liberty  to  use 
deceit  and  cunning  in  order  to  deceive-faUendum-others 
.  .  .  But  the  opposite  is  the  case  with  the  Italians  at  the 
present  day  ;  there,  there  is  liberty  to  deceive-fallendi- 
with  cunning  and  deceit .  .  . 

Deceive.     Decipere. 
Deception.    Deceptio. 

A.  830.  See  Deceit  at  these  refs.    D.2855.  2856.  2876. 

949.  In  that  chamber  .  .  .  they  consult  how  they  may 
fraudulently  deceive  others. 

11782.  '  Hunting '  =  to  deceive  by  persuasions,  and  by 
Knowledges  which  they  pervert. 


Deceive 


44 


Decline 


[A.]  5573.  Still,  they  did  not  use  these  pretences  in 
order  to  deceive  by  means  of  lies. 

9348.  The  deception  of  evils.  Sig.  .  .  Why  evils 
deceive.  Ex. 


D.  2075.  A  Spirit  acted  in  a  more  subtle  manner  than 
others  .  .  .  thus  deceiving,  which  was  natural  to  him  . .  . 

2967.  To-day  he  invents  another  wile,  in  order  to 
deceive  the  innocent  .  .  . 

37ioe.  They  seize  truths  and  goods,  but  solely  with 
the  end  of  deceiving  others. 

4321.  See  Paul  at  this  ref. 

Min.  47o6e.  Thus  by  deception  they  can  bend  the 
minds  of  others  .  .  . 

Deceive.    Falkre. 

A.  957e.  (They  are  punished)  until  they  are  struck 
with  terror  and  horror  at  deceiving  by  false  speeches. 

5270-.  He  is  much  mistaken.     53424. 

7356.  The  delight  of  their  life  to  reason  from  falsities, 
and  thus  to  deceive  and  seduce  others. 

9013.  See    Deceit    at    these   refs.      E.866.     3. 

J.(Post.)5. 

R.  455.  They  speak  truths  with  the  mouth,  but  falsify 
them  .  .  .  and  thus  deceive.  Sig. 


De  Conj.  88.  They  who  speak  much  about  God,  but 
care  nothing  about  deceiving  men  .  .  .  commit  adultery 
with  maid-servants  .  .  . 

Decimate.     See  under  Ten. 
Decision.    Derisio. 

A.  1 8574.  '  I  have  heard  a  consummation  and  decision ' 
(Is.xxviii.22). 

.   'Seventy  weeks  are  decreed  upon  thy  people' 

(Dan.ix.24). 

.    'Even    to    the    consummation    and   decision' 

(ver.27). 

2905e.  See  Consummate  at  these  refs.  R.478-. 
T.755e-  E.3749. 

10456.  Suspense  as  to  the  combat  between  falsity  and 
truth,  and  no  decision.  Sig. 


M.  i67e.  This  would  carry  with  it  the  declaration 
and  publication  of  their  love. 

296s.  Hence  .  .  .  declaration  belongs  to  the  men. 

300.  After  a  declaration  of  consent,  pledges  are  to  be 
given. 

3.  They  were   then   declared  to   be   bride    and 

bridegroom. 

D.  4650.  They  then  declared  that  they  now  know 
what  the  internal  man  is. 

E.  7S52.  They  declare  such  to  be  saved. 

Decline.     See  Turn  aside. 

Declivity.     Dedivitas,  Dec  live. 
M.  794.  We  descended  by  a  long  declivity. 

D.  4896.  They  appeared  as  on  a  height  to  which 
there  was  no  slope,  when  yet  there  are  everywhere 
slopes  by  which  people  ascend. 

5244.  According  to  the  declivity  of  the  globe  .  .  . 

Decorate.     Decorare. 
Decoration.     Decoramentum. 

A.  1627.  It  has  also  been  granted  me  to  see  the 
decorations  (in  Heaven),  as  for  instance  those  on  the 
steps  and  gates  ;  they  seemed  to  move  as  if  they  were 
alive,  and  to  vary  themselves  with  an  ever  new  beauty 
and  symmetry  ;  and  I  was  informed  that  the  variations 
can  go  on  for  ever  .  .  .  with  a  constantly  new  harmony  .  .  . 

I774e.  Adorned  with  chaplets  and  heavenly  orna- 
ments. 

2758e.  Their  wings  decorated  with  golden  and  silver 
colours  .  .  . 

R.  606.  Decorated  with  the  laurel  of  tutorship. 

M.  91.  To  decorate  herself,  and  exalt  her  beauty. 

T.  4042.  (The  love  of  the  world)  is  less  hurtful  if  it 
regards  as  an  end  the  splendid  things  of  the  world,  such 
as  palaces,  decorations  .  .  . 

797e.  They  adorned  (Melancthon's)  room  with  decora- 
tions .  .  . 


D.  5545.  AVithout  such  an  Intellectual,  he  could 
never  come  to  a  decision  as  to  what  is  true. 

E.  3973.  'Consummation'  and  'decision'  in  these 
passages=the  last  state  of  the  Church,  which  exists 
when  there  is  no  longer  truth  because  there  is  no  longer 
good  .  .  .  and  then  comes  the  Last  Judgment. 

De  Verbo  12.  This  will  of  good,  when  it  is  determined 
to  this  use,  becomes  .  .  .  the  affection  of  truth,  then  the 
perception  of  truth,  and  presently,  by  means  of  rational 
light,  the  thought  of  truth,  thus  decision  and  conclu- 
sion .  .  . 

Declare.     See  Tell,  XjTTER-enunfiare,  and 
Pronounce. 

Declare.     Dedarare. 
Declaration.     Dedaratio. 


D.  711.  There  was  only  shown  me  the  decoration 
which  followed,  only  the  decoration  of  a  gate  .  .  . 

1087.  On  rainbow  decorations. 

.  The  varieties  of  such  representations  or  decora- 
tions are  as  numerous  as  minds.  These  are  distinct 
from  the  decorations  of  the  spiritual. 

3381.  Men  and  little  children  so  decorated  that  they 
can  never  be  described. 

56oie.  On  their  beds  and  ceilings  there  sometimes 
appear  beautiful  variegations  of  many  decorations  when 
they  live  a  life  of  truth  and  good  ;  otherwise  they  are 
changed. 

6042.  (Melancthon)  found  out  how  by  a  phantastic 
art  to  produce  appearances  of  decorations  .  .  . 

6o88e.  There  are  also  table  decorations  which  cannot 
be  described  in  natural  language. 

J. (Post.)  28.  In  (Melancthon's)  chamber  there  are 
bare   stone  walls  without  decorations  .  .   .  When   he 


Decorum 


45 


De  Domino 


writes  these  things  about  good  works,  he  begins  to 
adorn  his  chamber  with  various  decorations  ;  but  after 
he  has  written  and  left  them  on  the  table  he  cannot  see 
them  .  .  .  and  then  the  decorations  of  his  chamber 
vanish. 

229.  The  truths  of  faith  are  compared  to  the  decora- 
tions and  furniture  in  palaces  .  .  . 

254.  The  decorations  in  the  houses  (of  the  Jews)  are 
resplendent  with  silver,  gold,  and  diamonds. 

Decorum.     See  Becoming. 

Decrease.     Decrescere,  Decrescentia. 

A.  4942.  As  the  Church  decreases  .  .  . 

495.  As  the  Most  Ancient  Church  decreased  .  .  . 

530.  The  case  with  Churches  is  that  they  decrease  .  .  . 
29093.  29 1  o4.  29 1 33. 

29053.  Good  and  truth  ...  is  wont  to  decrease. 

W.  94.  Spiritual  heat  and  light  decrease  in  proceed- 
ing, and  the  decrease  takes  place  through  degrees. 

186.  Thus  does  wisdom  decrease  down  to  ignorance, 
as  light  decreases  to  shade. 

2532.  In  each  Society  the  light  decreases  from  the 
middle  to  the  boundaries. 

302.  The  atmospheres  .  .  .  decrease  in  downward 
progression  according  to  degrees  of  breadth  .  .  .     303. 

Decree.     Decernere,  Decretum. 

A.  3401.  A  decree  from  the  Lord  in  the  Spiritual 
Church.  Sig.     3402. 

4738s.  When  it  was  decreed  concerning  the  Lord's 
two  natures  .  .  . 


D.  2876.  It  was  decreed  from  eternity  .  .  . 

Decree.     Sancire. 

P.  256.  A  religion  which  decrees  .  .  .  So,  too,  with 
some  other  things  decreed  of  the  Christian  religion. 

317.  Many  statutes  and  ordinances-sarea'ta. 

322s.  There  hardly  exists  a  nation  so  barbarous  as  not 
to  have  decreed  by  laws  that  murder  is  not  to  be 
committed  .  .  . 

R.  7984.  A  religion  by  which  it  is  decreed  that 
Divine  Power  belongs  to  a  man. 

T.  143.  The  Decalogue  .  .  .  decrees  that  .  .  . 

16.  (The  notion  that  the  Father  and  the  Son)  decree- 
decernant-a.nd  decree  who  are  worthy  .  .  . 

1342.  (And  that)  the  rest  may  remain  sons  of  wrath, 
as  was  before  decreed. 

465.  These  are  the  precepts,  dogmas,  and  decrees  of 
the  modern  Church  concerning  free-will  .  .  .  They  have 
been  presented  in  order  that  the  precepts,  dogmas,  and 
decrees  of  the  New  Church  on  these  subjects  may  be 
more  clearly  seen. 

50 13.  They  have  decreed  that  man  can  contribute 
nothing  .  .  . 

503.  They  then  poured  forth  and  published  their 
decree. 


De  Domino.     {The  work.) 

De  Dom.  1.  Date  of  the  De  Domino.  Ath.2.  45. 
52,  etc. 

Dedan.     Dedan. 
Dedanites.     Dedanim. 

A.  1168.  'Sheba  and  Dedan' (Gen.x.7)  are  the  nations 
with  whom  (these  Knowledges  of  faith)  were  :  in  the 
internal  sense  by  these  same  nations  are  signified  the 
Knowledges  themselves  ;  but  with  this  difference,  that 
by  'the  sons  of  Cush'  are  signified  the  Knowledges  of 
spiritual  things  ;  and  by  'the  sons  of  Raamah'  (that  is, 
Sheba  and  Dedan),  the  Knowledges  of  celestial  things. 
ii7i,Ill. 

1 1 72.  That  by  'Dedan'  are  signified  the  Knowledges 
of  lower  celestial  things,  which  are  in  rituals.  111. 

e.   'Dedan,'  here  (Jer.xlix.8),  in  the  proper  sense 

=  the  rituals  in  which  there  is  no  internal  worship  or 
adoration  of  the  Lord  from  the  heart  .  .  . 

3240.  'Jokshan  begat  Sheba  and  Dedan'  (Gen.xxv.3) 
=  the  derivations  from  the  first  lot. 

3.   'Sheba  and  Dedan'  are  those  who  constitute 

the  first  class,  that  is,  those  who  in  the  Lord's  Spiritual 
Kingdom  are  in  the  good  of  faith,  and  who  possess 
doctrinal  things  of  charity  ;  hence  it  is  that  'Sheba  and 
Dedan'  =  the  Knowledges  of  celestial  things,  or,  what  is 
the  same,  those  who  are  in  the  Knowledges  of  celestial 
things,  that  is,  who  are  in  the  doctrinal  things  of 
charity ;  for  doctrinal  things  are  Knowledges,  and 
charity  is  the  Celestial  which  belongs  to  the  spiritual 
man.  That  'Sheba  and  Dedan'  have  this  signification, 
was  shown  before;  but  there  'Sheba  and  Dedan'  are 
grandsons  of  Ham,  and  are  called  sons  of  Raamah.  The 
fact  is  that  there  never  were  such  persons  .  .  .  Yet  there 
were  nations  which  were  so  called,  but  which  were 
descended  from  others,  as  were  'Sheba  and  Dedan,'  who, 
as  is  here  evident,  were  descended  from  Jokshan  the  son 
of  Abraham  by  Keturah.  (The  signification  of  Dedan 
ill.) 

6.   'Sheba    and    Dedan'    (Ezek.xxxviii.  13)  =  the 

internal  things  of  worship,  namely,  the  goods  of  faith. 
...  In  the  proper  sense,  '  Sheba' = those  who  are  in  the 
Knowledges  of  good  ;  '  Dedan, '  those  who  are  in  the 
Knowledges  of  truth  from  good. 

324 1 .  '  The  sons  of  Dedan  were  Ashurim,  and  Letushim, 
and  Leummim'  (Gen.xxv.3)=the  derivations  from  the 
second  lot.  '  Dedan '  =  those  who  are  in  the  good  of 
faith,  properly,  those  who  are  in  the  truth  of  faith  from 
good. 

32687.  'The  troops  of  the  Dedanites'  (Is.xxi.i3)  = 
those  who  are  in  Knowledges. 

E.  1958.  'Dedan  was  thy  tradress  with  garments  of 
liberty  for  the  chariot'  (Ezek.xxvii.20) :  ' Dedan '  = 
those  who  are  in  the  Knowledges  of  celestial  things. 

Deduce.    See  Draw  down. 

Deed.     See  under  Do. 

Deem.      Censer e. 

A.  10217.  The  word  for  number  used  here  in  the 
Original  Language  means  to  survey,  reckon,  etc. 


Deep 


46 


Deep 


T.  343e.  Almost  nothing  besides  this  is  deemed  to  be 
properly  theological. 

Deep.     See  under  HiGH-atttts. 

Deep.     Abyssus. 

A.  18.  'The  faces  of  the  deep'  (Gen.i. 2)  =  cupidities 
and  thence  falsities,  from  and  in  which  he  is  wholly. 
As  he  has  no  light,  he  is  like  an  abyss,  or  a  confused 
dark  something.  Such  are  also  called  'the  abysses  and 
depths  of  the  sea '  in  various  places  in  the  Word,  which 
are  '  dried  up '  or  '  wasted '  before  man  is  being  regenerated, 
as  in  Is.li.  10. 

2o6e.  What  can  be  the  result  but  an  abyss  of  dark- 
ness ? 

215.  They  fall  into  mere  falsities,  thus  into  an  abyss 
of  darkness. 

756.  'The  fountains  of  the  great  deep  were  broken 
up'  (Gen.vii. u)  =  the  extreme  of  temptation  as  to 
voluntary  things.  .  .  'The  deep' =  cupidities  and  falsi  ties 
thence.  111.  845. 

.   'The  deep,'  and  'many  waters'  (Ezek.xxvi.  19) 

=  the  extreme  of  temptation. 

.   'Waters,'  and  'thedeep'  (Jon.ii.5)=theextreme 

of  temptation.      16915. 

2.  In  ancient  times,  the  deep  meant  Hell ;  and 

phantasies  and  false  persuasions  were  likened  to  the 
waters  and  floods  and  also  to  the  smoke  therefrom  ;  and 
so  do  some  of  the  Hells  appear,  to  wit,  as  deeps  and  as 
seas.  .  .  That  Hell  is  called  'the  deep,'  and  the  filthy 
things  thence,  'floods,'  is  evident  from  Ezek.xxxi.  15. 

S45e.  The  fountains  of  the  deep,  which  are  the  Hells. 

16642.   ' The  bottomless  pit'  (Rev.xi. 7)  =  Hell. 

270211.  'Rivers,'  'waters,'  'fountains,'  and  'deeps' 
(Deut.viii.7)  =  the  truths  thence  derived. 

13.   'Waters,'  'floods,'  and  'deeps'  (Ps.lxxviii.  15) 

=  truths  from  the  Lord. 

35793.  'The  deep  that  lieth  under'  (Deut.xxxiii.i3)= 
natural  things. 

41974.  'The  beast  from  the  bottomless  pit,'  or  Hell, 
'shall  kill  them'  (Rev.xi. 7)  =  the  vastation  of  good  and 
truth  within  the  Church. 

6431.  'Blessings  of  the  deep  that  lieth  under'  (Gen. 
xlix.25)  =  the  scientifics  which  are  in  the  Natural. 
.  .  .  'The  deep  that  lieth  under '  =  the  scientifics  in  the 
Natural :  the  Natural  is  called  '  the  deep  that  lieth 
under '  relatively  to  interior  things,  which  are  '  heaven ; ' 
and  as  the  Natural  is  signified  by  'the  deep  that  lieth 
under,'  scientifics  are  also  signified,  for  scientifics  together 
with  their  delights  are  in  the  Natural .  .  .  'The  deep' 
also  =  scientific  truths  in  the  Natural  in  the  blessing  of 
Joseph  (Deut.xxxiii.  13). 

6726e.  'The  deep  which  was  round  about'  (Jon.ii.5) 
=  the  evil  of  falsity. 

7519.   'The  pit  of  the  abyss'  (Rev.ix.2)=Hell. 

7643.  'The  abyss  out  of  which  the  locusts  came  = 
Hell. 

80993.  'The  waters  of  the  great  deep,'  and  'the  depths 
of  the  sea'  (Is.li.  10)  =  the  Hell  where  are  those  who  are 
in  faith  separated  from  charity,  and  in  a  life  of  evil. 


8278.  'The  deeps  have  covered  them'  (Ex. xv. 5)  =  that 
falsities  from  cupidities  have  overwhelmed  them.  'The 
deeps '  =  the  falsities  which  are  from  cupidities.  By 
'deeps'  in  the  Word  are  meant  waters,  and  the  abund- 
ance of  waters  in  the  depths;  and  waters  =  truths  or 
falsities  ;  and  the  depths-prof U7ida-ihe  Hells  :  hence  it 
is  that  'the  deeps '  =  falsities  from  cupidities,  and  also 
the  Hells. 

.  That  'the  deeps'  in  the  Word  mean  waters  in 

the  depths,  and  the  abundance  of  waters,  is  evideut  from 
Ezek.xxxi.4;  etc.  In  these  places,  'the  deeps'  stand 
for  waters  in  abundance  ;  and  waters  in  abundance,  or 
the  deeps,  stand  for  the  truths  of  faith  in  abundance. 
'He  made  them  drink  great  deeps  out  of  the  rock'  (Ps. 
lxxviii.  1 5)  =  truths  of  faith  without  deficiency.  'The 
deeps  going  forth  out  of  the  valley  and  out  of  the 
mountain'  (Deut.  viii.7)  =  the  truths  of  faith  from  love.  .  . 

a.  That   'the   deeps'  =  falsities  from   cupidities, 

thus  also  the  Hells.  111. 

3.  As  these  things  are  signified  by  'the  deeps,' 

temptations  are  also  signified  by  them  ;  for  temptations 
are  effected  through  the  injection  of  falsities  and  evils  by 
the  Hells.  111. 

8279.  'The  depths-pt-ofunditates'  =  the  Hells  rela- 
tively to  evils  ;  and  'the  deeps,'  the  Hells  relatively  to 
the  falsities  which  come  from  them.  111. 

8288.  'The  deeps  were  congealed  in  the  heart  of  the 
sea'  (Ex. xv.  8)  =  that  the  mere  falsities  from  the  evil  of 
the  cupidities  of  self-love  could  not  at  all  emerge.  .  . 
'The  deeps' =  falsities  from  cupidities,  and  also  the 
Hells. 

9433e.  'The  deep  with  which  it  is  covered  as  with  a 
garment'  (Ps.civ.6)  =  scientific  truth  for  the  natural  man. 

R.  421.  'There  was  given  unto  him  the  key  of  the 
pit  of  the  abyss'  (Rev.ix.  1)  =  their  Hell  opened.  .  . 
'The  abyss'  =  the  Hell  where  are  those  who  have  con- 
firmed with  themselves  justification  and  salvation  by 
faith  alone,  who  are  all  from  the  Church  of  the 
Reformed  ;  here,  however,  those  who,  in  their  own  eyes 
and  thence  in  the  eyes  of  many  others,  appear  learned 
and  erudite,  when  yet  before  the  Angels  in  Heaven  they 
appear  bereft  of  understanding  as  to  the  things  which 
are  of  Heaven  and  the  Church  ;  for  they  who  confirm 
that  faith  even  to  its  interiors  close  the  higher  things  of 
their  understanding,  and  at  last  to  such  a  degree,  that 
they  can  no  longer  see  any  spiritual  truth  in  light.  Ex. 
B.87.  89. 

2.  (This  pit,  and  the  abyss  below  it  described.) 

B.89. 

440.  'They  had  a  king  over  them,  the  angel  of  the 
abyss,  whose  name  in  Hebrew  is  Abaddon,  and  in  Greek 
he  hath  the  name  Apollyon'  (ver.  n)  =  that  those  are  in 
the  Satanic  Hell  who  are  in  falsities  from  concupiscences, 
and  have  destroyed  the  Church  by  the  total  falsification 
of  the  Word  .  .  .  'The  abyss '  =  the  Satanic  Hell,  where 
these  are. 

4422.  They    abide    in   the   southern   quarter  of  the 


500.  See  Beast  at  this  ref. 

5662.  There  then  ascended  some  from  the  abyss  who 
at  first  appeared  like  locusts,  but  afterwards  like  dwarfs ; 


Deep 


47 


Deep 


they  were  those  who  in  the  world  had  prayed  to  God  the 
Father,  and  had  confirmed  justification  by  faith  alone  ; 
being  the  same  as  those  treated  of  in  Rev.ix.2.  .  .  . 
They  said  that  they  saw  truths  in  light  ;  but  they  were 
told  that  they  saw  them  in  fatuous  light  .  .  .  which  is 
the  confirmation  of  falsity  .  .  .  and  this  was  confirmed 
by  the  fact  that  when  they  looked  up  to  Heaven  .  .  . 
they  saw  darkness  ;  but  when  they  looked  down  to  the 
abyss  .  .  .  they  saw  light  .  .  .     T.  162. 

3.  They  then  retired,   and  let  themselves  down 

into  their  abyss  .  .  . 

-4.  When  they  came  to  their  own  in  the  abyss  .  .  . 

734.  'Is  about  to  come  up  out  of  the  abyss,  and  go 
into  perdition'  (Rev.xvii.8)  =  what  is  sometimes  deliber- 
ated in  the  Papal  Consistory  concerning  the  reception 
and  reading  of  the  "Word  by  the  laity  and  common 
people,  but  it  is  rejected.  .  .  By  'the  abyss  out  of  which 
it  is  about  to  ascend'  nothing  can  be  signified  but  that 
religiosity,  and  especially  where  its  throne  is,  thus  the 
Papal  Consistory.  It  is  an  abyss,  because  that  which  is 
decreed  there  regards  dominion  over  the  holy  things  of 
the  Church  and  over  Heaven,  and  thus  over  all  things  of 
the  Lord  and  His  Word. 

840.  'Having  the  key  of  the  abyss'  (Rev.xx. i)  =  the 
Divine  Power  of  opening  and  shutting  Hell. 

843.  'His  being  cast  into  the  abyss'  (Rev.xx. 3)  — that 
they  were  let  down  towards  Hell. 

T.  32e.  How  singulars  emulate  universals,  and  re- 
present the  infinity  of  God,  is  an  abyss,  and  is  an  ocean. 

1  io7.  That  Spirit  was  then  sent  away  into  the  abyss 
treated  of  in  Rev.ix.2,  where  the  angels  of  the  dragon 
discuss  the  mystical  things  of  their  faith. 

ii3e.  Some  of  them  fell  into  the  abyss  treated  of  in 
Rev.ix.2,  which  is  now  in  the  southern  quarter,  towards 
the  east,  where  those  are  who  confirm  justification  by 
faith  alone. 

290e.  The  Lord's  Divine  wisdom  they  call  an  abyss. 
Now  as  the  Word  is  from  this  abyss,  because  from  the 
Lord,  it  is  evident  that  there  is  a  certain  infinity  in  all 
things  of  it. 

350.  The  Lord's  Word  is  an  abyss  of  truths  .  .  . 

628s.  'The  abyss'  (Rev.ix. n)  =  the  abode  of  these 
falsities. 


D.  2679.  When  the  eternal  was  represented  as  an 
abyss  without  a  bottom,  some  who  looked  into  its 
depths  were  struck  with  intense  fear  .  .  . 

3385.  As  the  darkness  of  the  abyss. 

5372.  Being  gathered  into  one  they  were  sent  into  the 
abyss  ;  their  abyss  is  in  the  southern  quarter  (towards 
the  east)  .  .  .  Hence  it  is  that  the  dragon  is  said  to  have 
been  sent  into  the  abyss,  and  there  kept  bound  a 
thousand  years. 

5467.  They  were  cast  into  such  an  abyss  as  opened  in 
front  of  that  lake,  which  abyss  was  dark,  and  tended 
deep  under  the  sulphurous  lake.  In  front  there  also 
opened  a  similar  abyss,  which  tended  underneath  the 
other  one  ;  into  this  were  cast  those  who  knew  about  the 
Divine,  and  frequented  places  of  worship,  and  yet  had 
been  in  like  wickedness.  5468,  See  the  figure.  De 
Conj.  93. 


5751.  On  the  abyss. 

■ .  The   abyss   treated   of  in  the  Revelation,  into 

which  the  dragon  was  at  length  cast,  is  completely  and 
directly  under  the  genitals  ;  there  appears  there  a  great 
and  wide  cavern,  black  and  pitch  dark  ;  thither  was  cast 
the  dragon  himself  (Bishop  Benzel.)  and  many  who 
adhered  to  him  ...  It  is  a  vast  gulf,  and  is  the  receptacle 
of  the  filth  of  the  urine,  but  not  of  that  of  the  excrement, 
because  all  there  love  falsities,  and  commingle  falsities 
with  truths. 

E.  27511.  'The  deeps  which  He  bestows  in  treasuries' 
(Ps.xxxiii.7)  =  the  scientific  sensuous  things  which  are 
the  most  general  and  ultimate  of  the  natural  man,  and 
simultaneously  in  which  are  interior  or  higher  truths. 
12 

283s.  'To  trust  under  the  deep'  (Ps.xci. 4)  =  scientific 
truth,  which  is  the  Divine  Spiritual  Natural. 

3401S.  'The  blessings  of  the  deep  that  lieth  under' 
(Gen.xlix.)  =  the  multiplications  of  truth  from  good  in 
the  external  or  natural  man. 

34211.  'The  seas'  and  'the" deeps'  (Ps.cxxxv.)  =  those 
who  are  in  the  ultimates  (of  Heaven). 

3724.  'The  deep  which  was  covered  over  him'  (Ezek. 
xxxi.  I5)  =  the  Knowledges  of  truth.  .  .  'The  deep,'  or 
'the  sea '  =  the  Scientific  and  Cognitive  in  general  which 
is  in  the  natural  man. 

3747.  ' Fountains '  =  interior  truths;  'deeps'  (Deut. 
viii),  exterior  truths. 

38825.  'Whales'  and  'deeps'  (Ps.cxlviii.7)  =  scientifics 
and  Knowledges  in  general,  or  in  the  whole  complex. 

40520.  'The  deep'  (Ps.xxxvi.)  =  truths  in  general, 
which  are  called  the  truths  of  faith. 

21.   'The  deep'  (Ps.civ. )  =  scientifics  in  general. 

31.   '  The  deep  that  lieth  under '  =  spiritual  natural 

things. 

4487.  'The  deep  that  lieth  under'  =  the  natural  man 
where  are  the  Knowledges  of  truth  and  good  for  per- 
ception, and  scientifics  which  confirm. 

5188.  'The  deeps  that  go  forth  out  of  the  valley  and 
out  of  the  mountain'  ( Deut. viii. )  =  the  Knowledges  of 
truth  and  good  in  the  natural  man,  and  in  the  Spiritual. 

15.   'The  deep'  (Ezek. xxxi. )  =  the  Knowledges  of 

truth  which  are  in  the  natural  man. 

5352.  'The  pit  of  the  abyss'  (Rev.ix.)  =  the  Hell 
where  and  whence  are  the  falsities  of  evil. 

536.  'There  was  given  unto  him  the  key  of  the  pit  of 
the  abyss '  =  communication  and  conjunction  with  the 
Hells.  .  .  'The  pit  of  the  abyss '  =  the  Hells  where  and 
whence  are  the  falsities  of  evil. 

537.  'And  he  opened  the  pit  of  the  abyss  ^communi- 
cation and  conjunction  with  the  Hells  where  and  whence 
are  such  falsities.  .  .  The  reason  it  is  called  'the  pit  of 
the  abyss,'  is  that  'a  pit'  (or  well)  =  the  Word  in  the 
sense  of  the  letter  and  the  truth  of  doctrine  thence,  and 
in  the  opposite  sense  the  Word  falsified  and  thence 
falsity  of  doctrine  ;  and  'the  abyss'  and  depth  of  the 
sea = Hell.  The  reason  it  =  the  Hell  where  are  those 
who  falsified  the  truths  of  the  Word  by  applying  them 
to  evils  of  life,  is  that  these  Hells  appear  to  those  who 


Deep 


48 


Deep 


are  above  like  seas,  and  those  who  are  there  appear  in 
their  depths  .  .  .     538. 

[E.]  538s.  That  'seas,'  'depths,'  and  ' abysses '  =  the 
Hells  where  and  whence  are  the  falsities  of  evil.  111. 

14.  As  'the  abysses'  =  the  Hells  where  and  whence 

are  falsities,  so  'the  abysses '  =  the  ultimates  of  Heaven, 
where  and  whence  are  the  Knowledges  of  truth,  which 
are  the  truths  of  the  natural  man.  The  reason  is  that 
the  ultimates  of  Heaven  also  appear  as  it  were  in  waters, 
but  thin  and  clear  ones  .  .  .   111. 

15.   'Abysses'  in  these  places = the   ultimates  of 

Heaven,  in  which  are  the  spiritual  natural  Angels. 

e.  Moreover,    'abysses'    also  =  Divine   truths  in 

abundance,  and  the  arcana  of  Divine  Wisdom.  111. 

539.  'The  pit  of  the  abyss '  =  the  Hell  where  are  they 
who  have  falsified  the  Word. 

650.   'The  abyss '  =  Hell. 

12.   'The  deeps' and  'the  seas' (Ps.  cxlviii. )  =  the 

Natural  itself  where  are  scientifics. 

946s.  'Judgments'  are  predicated  of  Divine  truths, 
which  are  compared  to  'a  great  deep'  (Ps.xxxvi.6)  ;  for 
'the  great  deep '  =  Divine  truth. 

1055.  'Is  about  to  come  up  out  of  the  abyss,  and  go 
into  perdition '  =  the  Word  acknowledged  as  Divine  for 
form's  sake,  but  still  rejected.  '  To  come  up  out  of  the 
abyss,'  when  predicated  of  the  Word  with  those  who 
belong  to  Babylonia,  =  to  be  received  and  acknowledged 
as  Divine  for  form's  sake. 

Deep.     Profundus. 
Depth.     Profunditas. 
Deeply.     Prof  wide. 

A.  9042.  This  would  be  to  have  an  infernal  deep 
between  him  and  the  Lord. 

12863.  'Deep  of  lip'  (Ezek.iii.5)  is  said  of  the  gen- 
tiles, who,  although  they  are  in  falsity  of  doctrine,  are 
still  in  charity  .  .  . 

i3o7e.  The  more  the  Hells  will  to  lift  up  their  heads 
to  Heaven,  the  more  deeply  they  depress  themselves. 

1380.  By  phantasies  Spirits  may  be  carried  up  on 
high  .  .  .  and  at  the  same  moment  into  the  deep. 

205  73.  In  the  other  life,  all  who  are  in  self-love  are 
more  deeply  infernal  than  others. 

2754.  The  Hell  of  the  most  deceitful  is  deeply  under 
the  heel. 

46013.  The  deepest  Hell  awaits  (profaners). 

47504.  They  who  are  in  self-love,  being  against  all 
good  whatever,  are  in  the  deepest  and  therefore  in  the 
most  grievous  Hells  ;  but  they  who  are  in  the  love  of 
the  world  .  .  .  are  in  Hells  not  so  deep  .  .  .     83183. 

4936.  Magicians  .  .  .  are  deeply  in  caverns  ;  those 
who  have  been  more  pernicious  are  more  deeply  buried. 

4951.  Beneath  the  heel  .  .  .  there  is  a  Hell  deep 
down  .  .  .  Here  are  the  most  wicked  .  .  .  They  are 
often  punished,  and  are  then  let  more  deeply  down  .  .  . 
Out  of  that  deep  is  sometimes  heard  a  tumult  as  of 
massacre. 

5c>57e.  The  more  deeply  (they  cast  themselves  into 
Hell)  the  better  it  is  for  them. 


5394.  These  Hells  are  .  .  .  partly  deep  down  in  front. 

5715.  There  appeared  a  great  square  opening  tending 
obliquely  downwards  to  a  great  depth  ;  in  the  deep 
was  seen  a  round  opening  .  .  . 

572ie.  Such  are  cast  into  Hell  deeply. 

5977e.  Genii  are  in  the  Hells  at  the  back,  deep 
down  .  .  . 

6318.  They  were  seen  rising  from  the  deep  .  .  . 

63532.  They  are  more  tortured  by  the  evil  of  their 
life  in  Heaven  than  in  the  deepest  Hell. 

6677.  When  the  infernals  try  to  attack  goods,  they 
are  cast  deeply  into  Hell. 

66922.  In  the  deepest  (of  the  Hells  of  the  magicians) 
are  the  Egyptians. 

8273e.  Whenever  (the  Hells  endeavour  to  force  their 
way  up)  a  number  of  them  are  cast  down  more  deeply. 

8278.  'Abysses'  mean  abundance  of  water  in  the 
deeps  .  .  .  and  by  the  deeps  are  signified  the  Hells. 

8279.  'They  went  down  into  the  depths  like  a 
stone'  (Ex. xv. 5)  =  they  sank  to  lower  things  as  by 
their  weight  .  .  .  'The  depths'  =  lower  things  where 
the  Hells  are. 

.  See  Deep -abyssus,  at  this  ref. 

2.  (The  term  'deep'  111.) 

e.  The  reason  'the  deep '  =  Hell  relatively  to  evil, 

is  that  it  is  opposite  to  'high,'  by  which  is  signified 
Heaven,  and  which  is  predicated  of  good. 

8298.  'They  sought  the  deep  like  lead'  (Ex.xv.  10)  = 
that  evil  dragged  them  down  to  lower  things,  like 
weights  in  the  world.  'The  deep '  =  lower  things,  and 
the  Hells  as  to  evils. 

83 182.  They  who  are  in  the  evil  of  self-love  are  deeply 
in  Hell  in  proportion  to  the  quality  and  quantity  of 
that  love. 

8325.  States  of  truth  and  good,  and,  in  the  opposite 
sense,  states  of  falsity  and  evil,  are  represented  in  the 
other  life  by  heights  and  depths. 

9656.  Hence  deep  things  —  exterior  ones,  and  high 
things  =  interior  ones. 

9937s.   'The  depth  of  the  sea'  (Mic.vii.  i9)  =  Hell. 

ioi8ie.  Hell  is  said  to  be  in  the  deep,  because  there 
are  no  perfection,  intelligence  or  wisdom,  and  no  good 
and  truth  there. 

102873.  The  Hells  of  the  profanations  of  truth  .  .  . 
are  deeper  than  the  Hells  of  all  other  evils,  and  are 
rarely  opened. 

H.  3.  They  who  have  denied  the  Lord's  Divine  .  .  . 
are  let  down  into  the  deep,  and  thus  completely 
separated  from  the  rest  from  the  Christian  world. 

578.  They  who  are  not  so  deceitful  .  .  .  are  not  in 
such  deep  Hells. 

586.  In  the  deeper  Hells  are  those  who  have  acted 
interiorly  from  evil  ;  in  the  less  deep  ones  are  those 
who  have  acted  exteriorly,  that  is,  from  the  falsities 
of  evil. 

P.  296s.  Of  himself,  an  evil  man  continually  leads 
himself  more  deeply  into  his  evils.  Ex. 


Deep 


49 


Deer 


R.  143.  '  Who  have  not  known  the  depths  of  Satan, 
as  they  speak'  (Rev. ii. 24)  =  who  do  not  understand  their 
interior  things,  which  are  mere  falsities  .  .  .  Its  'depths' 
=  the  interior  things  of  the  doctrine  separated  from 
charity  .  .  .  The  deep  and  interior  things  of  this  doc- 
trine are  what  are  delivered  in  their  books,  lectures, 
and  preaching. 

232e.  Their  lot  is  that  they  are  let  down  into  the 
deep  .  .  . 

T.  1 596.  Have  you  seen  Socinus  ...  or  Arius  ?  .  .  . 
They  are  in  the  deep  beneath  you  .  .  . 

245.  Without  the  understanding  of  the  Word,  as  it  is 
in  itself,  in  its  bosom,  and  in  its  depth  .  .  . 

D.  1277.  On  the  deepest  Hell.  1278.  1279.  1288, 
Gen.  art.     3358. 

1292.  On  a  deep  Hell  under  the  feet. 

3365.  They  were  let  down  to  some  depth. 

3800.  Being  inspected  when  in  the  deep  .  .  . 

463 13.  In  all  the  Hells  there  are  places  deeper  and 
deeper,  which  are  worse  in  the  lower  parts,  and  still 
worse  in  the  still  deeper  ones  ;  I  have  seen  them  cast 
down  from  one  depth  into  another  ;  and  the  deeper  they 
go  the  denser  is  the  appearance  of  the  mist  which 
encompasses  them  .  .  . 

4682.  The  depth  (of  this  Hell)  is  great. 

5204.  There  are  gulfs  wide  and  long,  and  also  deep 
.  .  .  with  depths  doubled  and  trebled. 

5496.  The  depths  (of  their  Hell)  are  numerous  accord- 
ing to  the  degree  of  the  evil. 

E.  171.  'Who  have  not  known  the  depths  of  Satan, 
as  they  speak '  =  ensnarement  thereby  .  .  .  Satan  .  .  . 
continually  inspires  the  loves  of  self  and  of  the  world, 
and  man  receives  these  loves  with  delight,  because  they 
are  in  him  hereditarily,  and  thus  are  his  proprium  ;  thus 
does  Hell  insinuate  itself  with  man  and  ensnare  him  ; 
these  things  are  what  are  signified  by  'the  depths  of 
Satan.' 

45311.  'A  people  of  depths  of  lip'  (Is.xxxiii.  19)  = 
falsities  of  doctrine  confirmed  even  to  the  appearance  of 
truth.     45513. 

45512.  'Peoples  deep  of  lip'  (Ezek.iii.6)  =  those  who 
are  in  doctrine  which  is  not  intelligible. 

51412.  'Wonders  in  the  deep'  (Ps.cvii.24)  =  the  hidden 
things  of  intelligence  and  wisdom. 

5379.  'The  depths  of  the  waters'  (Ps.lxix.  14)  =  falsi- 
ties from  the  Hells  ;  'neither  let  the  deep  swallow  me 
up'  =  let  not  the  Hell  do  so  where  are  the  falsities  of 
evil,  or  let  not  the  falsities  of  evil  which  are  from  Hell. 

538s.  This  is  signified  by  ...  'He  dried  up  the  sea 
.  .  .  and  set  its  depths  for  a  way  that  the  redeemed  might 
pass  over'  (Is.li.  10). 

5.   'To  dry  up  all  the  depths  of  the  river'  (Zech. 

x.  n)  =  to  dissipate  all  the  falsities  of  evil,  even  the 
deeper  ones. 

7.    'The  depths  of  the  sea'  (Mic.vii.  19)  =  the  Hells 

where  and  whence  are  the  falsities  of  evil ;  therefore  it 
is  said  that  'He  will  cast  all  our  sins  into  the  depths  of 
the  sea. ' 

VOL.  11. 


n.   'Into  the  depth  even  into  the  heart  of  the 

seas'  (Jon. ii. 3)  =  Hell. 

13.   'The  sea'  and  its  ' depths '  =  the  Hells.  111. 

659s.  'In  the  depths'  (Ps.lxxxviii.6)  =  as  it  were  in 
evils. 

11823.  'To  be  sunk  in  the  deep  of  the  sea'  (Matt. 
xviii.6)=to  be  cast  into  Hell. 

Deer.     See  under  Hind. 

Defame.     Diffamare. 

A.  4689s.  They  did  so  because  if  they  spoke  against 
religion  they  would  be  defamed.     T.405:!. 

3.  He  who  believes  otherwise  is  defamed. 

5721.  If  they  detected  any  blemish  .  .  .  they  defamed 
them. 

T.  321.  'To  bear  false  witness  against  the  neighbour' 
(means)  to  traduce  and  defame  the  neighbour  .  .  . 


D.  5962.  (They)  could  acutely  defame  others. 

Defecate.     Defaecare. 
Defecation.     Defaecatio. 

A.  3492.   'Purge  (the  sons  of  Levi)'  (Mal.iii.3). 

5182.  This  is  represented  by  the  impurities  in  the 
blood,  from  which  it  is  to  be  defecated  ;  this  defecation 
is  effected  by  means  of  violent  motions  .  .  . 

8009.  That  his  truth  must  be  defecated  from  impure 
loves.  Sig. 

9293e.  'To  purify  the  sons  of  Levi,  and  to  purge  them 
as  gold  and  silver '  =  the  purification  of  good  and  truth 
from  evils  and  falsities. 

W.  4192.  So  far  the  love  is  defecated  from  its  impuri- 
ties, and  is  purified  .  .  . 

M.  1452.  Defecation,  rectification,  etc. 

E.  11593.  'Lees,'  and  'lees  well  refined'  (Is.xxv.6)  = 
truths  from  that  good,  with  the  happiness  therefrom. 

D.  Wis.  x.  3.  This  may  be  illustrated  by  the  defeca- 
tion of  the  blood  in  the  lungs  .  .  . 

Defect.     See  ¥  kv^-deficere. 

Defend.     Defender e. 
Defence.     Defensio. 

A.  270.  See  Angel  at  these  refs.  737.  751.  761. 
1683.  5954s- 

i683e.  The  good  are  in  their  veriest  life  .  .  .  when 
they  can  perform  the  use  of  defending  others  from  evils. 

2709.  See  Bow  at  this  ref. 

285 13.  Angels  from  the  Lord,  that  is,  the  Lord, 
defend  (the  rational  mind). 

4227.  Probity  defends  itself. 

4248e.  Man  cannot  undergo  temptations  before,  because 
he  is  not  as  yet  in  the  Knowledges  whereby  to  defend 
himself. 

4274.  Truth  is  assaulted  by  the  evil  Spirits,  and 
defended  by  the  Angels  who  are  with  the  man  .  .  . 

45994-  '  Towers '  =  the  interior  truths  which  defend 
those  things  which  are  of  love  and  charity. 

50087.   (When  this  ultimate  truth  is  withdrawn)  the 


Defend 


50 


Deficient 


spiritual  man  no  longer  lias  anything  wherewith  to 
defend  himself  against  the  natural  man.  Sig.  5oo9e. 
5022.  502S2. 

[A.]  50362.  See  Temptation  at  these  refs.  6097. 
8960.  8975. 

64052.  As  soon  as  a  man  who  is  in  truth  and  not  yet 
in  good  brings  anything  into  act  from  a  religious  principle, 
he  afterwards  defends  it  as  if  it  were  the  veriest  truth. 

64192.  'A  wall'  =  the  truths  of  faith  which  defend. 
111. 

66632.  He  who  defends  his  opinion  .  .  .  confirms  it. 

7297e.  '  Fortifications  '  =  truths,  in  so  far  as  they 
defend  goods. 

74372.  What  a  man  loves  he  confirms  and  defends, 
and  evils  cannot  be  confirmed  and  defended  except  by 
means  of  falsities.  The  reason  they  who  are  in  evils 
think  to  the  falsities  by  which  they  defend  evils,  is  that 
evils  are  the  very  delights  of  their  life  .  .  . 

e.  Such,  after  having  for  some  little  time  defended 

evils  by  falsities,  persuade  themselves  that  evils  are 
goods,  and  falsities  truths. 

90243.  'To  plead  their  suit '  =  to  defend  and  deliver 
from  falsities.     . 

9300s.  They  maintain  that  the  natural  man  cannot 
apprehend  the  things  of  faith. 

M.  365.  The  zeal  of  a  good   love  .  .  .  never  breaks 

forth  against  the  other,  but  only  defends  itself ;  and  it 

defends  itself  against  evil  as  when  this  rushes  into  a 
fire  and  is  burnt  up. 

D.  1063.  It  is  otherwise  when  men  defend  themselves 
from  their  enemies  ...  for  this  is  to  be  considered  as  a 
just  defence  .  .  . 

3904.  He  was  of  those  who  have  .  .  .  defended  (the 
Knowledges  of  faith)  with  zeal  .  .  .  but  now  knew 
nothing. 

3913.  The  skull  .  .  .  which  defends  (the  brain). 

4139.  The  evil  Spirits  attack,  and  the  good  only 
defend. 

4675.  Societies  of  Spirits  have  their  own  proper 
defences- defensionalia. 

e.  Every  animal  has  its  own  def ence-dffensionale. 

4735-  Whatever  opinion  they  take  up  .  .  .  they 
defend  .  .  . 

4737-  When  (Swab)  defended  himself  against  the 
evil  .  .  . 

E.  734e-  They  who  are  in  falsities  always  make  the 
attack,  but  they  who  are  in  truths  only  defend. 

D.  Wis.  xi.  2.  (2nd  series).  Hence  come  .  .  .  the 
defences  of  disagreeing  dogmas  within  the  Church. 

C.  164.  He  is  also  the  aggressor,  when  aggression  is 
defence. 

Defend.     Patrocinari. 

A.  75022.  To  defend  falsities  and  evils  .  .  .  7577s. 
7766. 

101223.  He  defends  evils  by  his  intellectual  faculty. 

106402.  Lest  he  appropriate  some  doctrinal  thing 
which  defends  evil.     e. 


D.  4659.  They  could  defend  evils  and  falsities  with 
such  ingenuity  .  .  . 

5372.  They  defended  every  evil  .  .  . 
Deficient.  See  Y  xYL-deficere. 
Defiguration.    Defiguratio. 

Coro.  43e.  For  the  sake  of  this  transfiguration  and 
defiguration  of  heavenly  things  .  .  . 

Defile.     See  under  Contaminate,  and  Un- 
clean. 

Defile.      Cofispurcare. 
Defilement.     Co?ispurcatio. 

See  Filth- spur cus. 

A.  2468s.  Such  persons  are  described  in  the  Word  .  .  . 
when  their  good  is  not  as  yet  so  much  defiled  ;  then, 
when  it  is  defiled  ;  and  afterwards,  when  it  is  altogether 
defiled.     3.  6.  w    4I74- 

4050e.  See  Lymph  at  this  ref. 

4462s.  See  Most  Ancient  Church  at  this  ref. 

5390e.  They  had  been  endowed  with  a  certain  intel- 
lectual faculty,  which  they  had  abused  to  defile  even 
the  holy  things  of  the  Word  and  of  doctrine. 

59549.  See  DEFiLE-po^ttere-at  these  refs.     E.  1953. 
7091.  They  would  thus  defile  the  Divine.  7290e. 

79022.  If  there  is  one  falsity  .  .  .  the  truths  themselves 
remaining  are  thus  defiled  .  .  . 

10049.  The  lowest  and  natural  things  are  more  defiled 
with  evils  and  falsities  than  interior  ones  .  .  . 

102082.  The  sanctuaries  .  .  .  were  defiled  when  the 
people  sinned. 

H.  302e.  The  good  which  flows  in  he  defiles  with 
merit. 

561.  Hence  the  Divine  cannot  flow  in,  because  the 
instant  it  does  so,  it  is  immersed  in  thoughts  about  self, 
and  is  defiled. 

W.  420e.  All  the  defilement  of  man  is  effected  through 
falsities  opposed  to  the  truths  of  wisdom. 

421.  The  love  or  will  is  defiled  in  the  understanding, 
and  by  it,  if  they  are  not  elevated  together.  Gen.  art. 

424.  Love  denied  in  the  understanding,  and  by  it, 
becomes  natural,  sensuous,  and  corporeal.  Gen. art. 

R.  166.  See  DEFiLE-iiiquinare,  at  these  refs.  620. 
W.419. 

729.  The  Roman  Catholic  religiosity  .  .  .  has  defiled 
and  profaned  the  things  of  the  Word  and  of  the  Church. 
Sig. 

Defile.     Inquinare. 
Defilement.     Inquinamentum. 

A.  6388.  They  thus  not  only  defile  genuine  love  or 
charity,  but  also  pervert  it. 

70903.  These  things  are  darkness  and  defilements  .  .  . 

H.  515.  Nor  have  they  denied  their  spiritual  life  by 
the  grossnesses  from  honours  and  riches. 

W.  4192.  Through  the  understanding,  the  love  .  .  . 


Defile 


51 


Deflower 


sees  what  the  evils  are  which  pollute  and  defile-conspiir- 
cant-the  love. 

R.  166.  'Who  have  not  defiled  their  garments'  (Rev. 
hi.  4)  =  who  are  in  truths,  and  have  not  defiled-conspwr- 
eaverunt-iheiv  worship  through  evils  of  life  and  the 
falsities  thence. 

620.  'These  are  they  who  have  not  been  defiled  with 
women'  (Rev.xiv.4)  =  that  they  have  not  adulterated  the 
truths  of  the  Church,  and  defiled-conspurcaiteriiit-ihem. 
with  falsities  of  faith. 

T.  366s.  The  evil  obstruct  this  influx  by  .  .  .  spiritual 
defilements  .  .  . 


E.  195.  See  Sardis  at  this  ref. 

862.  'These  are  they  who  have  not  been  defiled  with 
women '  =  those  who  have  not  falsified  the  truths  of  the 
Word. 

Defile.     Polluere. 
Defilement.    Pollutio. 

A.  4439.  'Jacob  heard  that  he  had  defiled  Dinah  his 
daughter'  (Gen.  xxxiv.  5)  =  conjunction  not  lawful.  .  .  The 
defilement  of  marriages  =  conjunction  not  lawful. 

4460.  'Because  he  defiled  Dinah  their  sister' =  initia- 
tion to  conjunction. 

45039.  '  To  defile  the  houses,  and  fill  the  courts  with 
the  slain'  (Ezek.ix.7)  =  to  profane  goods  and  truths. 

4504.  '  Because  they  had  defiled  their  sister '  =  because 
they  had  defiled-/oe<iat;erMn£-the  truth  of  faith. 

59549.  'Defiled garments'  (Zech.iii.  3)  =  truths  defiled- 
conspurcatis-by  the  falsities  which  are  from  evil. 
E.74016. 


E.  1953.  Thus  are  Knowledges  from  the  Word  polluted 
and  detiled-conspurcantur-by  the  loves  of  self  and  of 
the  world  .  .  . 

38815.  'To  defile  the  temple  of  holiness'  (Ps.lxxix.  1) 
=to  profane  worship. 

Define.     Defi,7iire. 
Definition.     Definitio. 
Definite.     Definitus. 

A.  448e.  They  deprive  Spirits  of  all  sense  by  their 
definitions  and  suppositious. 

2575*.  As  a  thousand  ...  is  a  definite  number  .  .  . 

8533.  Goods  .  .  .  are  determined  with  every  man 
while  he  lives  in  the  world ;  they  are  determined 
according  to  the  quantity  and  quality  of  the  faith  and 
charity  in  his  life. 

T.  173.  They  said  .  .  .  Thus  do  the  chiefs  of  the 
Church  define  the  word  person.  .  .  I  said,  Is  this  a 
definition  of  person  ?  .  .  .  You  have  defined  person  as 
being  that  which  properly  subsists  .  .  . 

28.  It  cannot  define  it  otherwise  .  .  . 

52.  Here  we  will  open  the  subject  of  order  by  a  general 
definition  of  it.  .  .  In  this  definition  .  .  . 

132.  The  determined  damnation  .  .  . 

423.  Charity  may  be  defined  as  .  .  . 


D.  2369.   Inhering  in  their  significations  and  defini- 


tions of  such  words  ...  in  the  definitions  of  certain 
words  .  .  . 

2370.  They  who  have  not  inhered  in  the  philosophical 
definitions  of  words  .  .  . 

4627.  Cannot  be  defined  .  .  , 

Min.  4578.  See  Philosophy  at  these  refs.     4655. 

Deflower.     Deflorare. 
Defloration.    Defioratio. 

A.  828.  (On  those  who  are  in  the  desire  to  deflower 
virgins ;  the  enormity  and  the  punishment  of  this 
crime.)     D.2704.  De  Conj.126. 

M.  3i9e.  The  lust  of  defloration  .  .  .  has  led  some  to 
desire  repeated  marriages. 

454.  The  lust  of  fornication  is  more  grievous  as  it 
verges  to  the  desire  of  .  .  .  defloration.  Gen.  art. 

501.  On  the  lust  of  defloration.     Gen.art. 

.  This  lust  is  not  only  a  lust  of  adultery,  but  is 

more  grievous  than  (ordinary  adulteries)  ;  for  the  lust  of 
defloration  .  .  .  cannot  previously  exist  with  anyone. 

5022.  The  wives  said  .  .  .  that  this  state  commenced 
from  the  moment  of  defloration  .  .  . 

504.  Defloration,  without  a  view  to  marriage,  is  the 
villainy  of  a  robber.  Gen.art. 

.  Some  adulterers  are  possessed  of  the  desire  of 

deflowering  virgins,  and  thus  girls  .  .  .  and  after  deflora- 
tion they  leave  them,  and  continually  seek  for  others 
.  .  .  and  this  lust  grows  to  be  the  chief  of  the  delights 
of  their  flesh.  .  .  This  villainy  remains  inrooted  .  .  .  after 
death.  .  .  A  woman  deflowered  by  such  .  .  .  becomes  a 
harlot,  which  is  to  be  laid  at  the  door  of  that  robber.  .  . 
As  such  are  violators  of  marriage,  and  despisers  of  the 
female  sex,  and  thus  are  spiritual  robbers,  it  is  evident 
that  the  Divine  Nemesis  pursues  them. 

505.  The  lot  of  those  who  have  confirmed  themselves 
in  the  persuasion  that  the  lust  of  defloration  is  not  an 
evil  of  sin,  after  death  is  grievous.  Gen.art. 


D.  4741.  See  Charles  XII.  at  this  ref. 

Deformity.     See  Ugly. 

Defraud.     See  under  Fraud. 

Defunct.     See  DiE-de/ungere. 

Degrade.     See  under  Abrogate. 

Degree.     Grains. 
Graduate.      Graduare. 

See  under  Region. 

A.  62.  By  degrees  (man  becomes  regenerate). 

3i6e.  Are  led  by  degrees  to  Heaven. 

543.  To  that  degree  that  they  could  bear  no  more  .  .  . 
Hence  it  is  evident,  that  not  only  are  there  degrees  (of 
heavenly  joy)  .  .  . 

657.  There  are  three  degrees  of  intellectual  things  in 
man ;  the  lowest  is  the  Scientific,  the  middle  is  the 
Rational,  the  highest  is  the  Intellectual ;  these  are  so 
distinct  from  each  other  as  never  to  be  confounded. 
(Sig.  by  the  three  stories  of  the  ark. ) 

658.  These  three  degrees  .  .  .  understanding,  reason, 


Degree 


52 


Degree 


and  knowledge,  are  also  signified  by  the  windows  of  the 
three  tiers  in  the  Temple  (i  Kings  vi.)  ;  and  also  by  the 
rivers  which  went  forth  from  Eden.     655s. 

[A.]  15553.  The  new  life  is  received  by  degrees. 

1627.  Decorations  of  steps,  described. 

i66ie.  By  degrees.  1871.  41452.  7186  (occurs  five 
times).  H.335. 

1S205.  In  the  highest  degree.  (In  the  sense  of 
superlative. ) 

20232.  Love  to  the  Lord  is  in  a  higher  degree  (than 
love  towards  the  neighbour). 

25046.  All  these  are  called  spiritual  things,  which  are 
thus  distinguished  into  degrees,  and  succeed  each  other 
in  such  an  order. 

30202.  The  natural  mind  is  a  distinct  mind  from  the 
rational  one,  and  is  in  a  lower  degree  .  .  . 

3209.  The  Rational  is  in  a  degree  above  theNatural .  . . 

3309.  Scieutifics  are  of  two  kinds,  or  of  two  degrees, 
sensuous  things  and  scientific  ones.  Sig.  and  Ex. 

3404.  These  appearances  or  truths  are  of  a  higher 
degree.  Tr. 

34052.  The  appearances  of  truth  which  are  of  a  higher 
degree  far  surpass  in  abundance  and  perfection  those 
which  are  in  a  lower  degree  ;  for  myriads  of  myriads  of 
things  which  are  distinctly  perceived  by  those  who  are 
in  a  higher  degree,  appear  as  only  a  single  one  to  those 
who  are  in  a  lower  degree  ;  for  lower  things  are  nothing 
but  compounds  of  higher  ones  ;  as  may  be  inferred  from 
the  memories  of  man,  the  interior  of  which,  being  in  a 
higher  degree,  far  surpasses  the  exterior  one,  which  is 
in  a  lower  degree. 

e.  The  Angels  of  the  Third  Heaven  are  in  the 

fourth  degree  above  man. 

3412.  The  appearances  of  truth  of  a  lower  degree.  Tr. 
3646.  In  a  like  degree  and  manner. 

2.  The  souls  of  men  are  in  a  higher  degree  (than 

those  of  brutes). 

3691.  The  reason  it  is  said,  the  good  and  truth  of  that 
degree,  is  that  goods  and  truths  are  entirely  distinct 
from  each  other  according  to  degrees  ;  interior  goods  and 
truths  are  in  a  higher  degree,  and  exterior  ones  are  in  a 
lower  degree  ;  in  a  higher  degree  are  the  goods  and 
truths  of  the  Rational,  in  a  lower  one  are  the  goods  and 
truths  of  the  Natural,  and  in  the  lowest  are  the  sensuous 
goods  and  truths  which  are  of  the  body.  The  interior 
goods  and  truths,  or  those  in  a  higher  degree,  inflow 
into  the  exterior  goods  and  truths,  or  those  in  a  lower 
degree,  and  there  present  their  own  image  .  .  .  Hence  it 
is  evident,  that  the  goods  and  truths  .  .  .  which  are  in 
a  higher  degree  are  entirely  separated  from  those  in  a 
lower  one,  and  so  separated,  that  the  interior  ones  or 
those  in  a  higher  degree,  are  able  to  come  into  existence 
independently  of  the  exterior  ones,  or  those  which  are 
in  a  lower  degree.  He  who  has  not  a  distinct  notion  of 
degrees,  cannot  have  a  distinct  notion  of  interior  and 
exterior  goods  ;  nor  how  the  case  is  with  the  soul  of 
man  ...  or  with  the  Heavens  .  .  . 

3.  These  three  Heavens  are  most  distinct  from 

each  other  according  to  degrees  .  .  . 


4.  They  who  are  in  love  to  the  Lord,  so  as  to 

have  a  perception  of  the  love,  are  in  a  higher  degree  of 
good  and  truth,  and  are  in  the  Third  Heaven  .  .  .  and 
are  called  Celestial  Angels  ;  but  they  who  are  in  charity 
towards  the  neighbour,  so  as  to  have  a  perception  of  the 
charity,  but  not  so  much  a  perception  of  love  to  the 
Lord,  are  in  a  lower  degree  of  good  and  truth,  and  are 
in  the  Second  Heaven  .  .  .  and  are  called  Spiritual 
Angels  ;  while  they  who  are  in  charity  towards  the 
neighbour  merely  from  the  affection  of  truth,  so  as  not 
to  have  a  perception  of  the  charity  itself,  except  from 
the  truth  by  which  they  are  affected,  are  in  a  still  lower 
degree  of  good  and  truth,  and  are  in  the  First  Heaven 
.  .  .  and  are  called  good  Spirits.  Hence  it  may  in  some 
measure  appear  how  the  case  is  with  degrees  ;  namely, 
that  those  things  which  are  in  a  higher  degree,  present 
themselves  in  an  image  in  those  which  are  in  the  next 
lower  one  .  .  . 

e.  Into  these   degrees    are   the   three    Heavens 

distinguished,  and  according  to  these  degrees  does  the 
Lord  flow  iu  with  Divine  good  and  truth,  thus  with 
wisdom  and  intelligence,  and  with  heavenly  joy  and 
happiness. 

3699e.  There  are  lowest  goods  and  truths,  and  highest 
ones,  and  between  them  there  are  steps  as  of  a  ladder. 

37472.  There  are  three  degrees  of  life  in  man,  as  there 
are  three  degrees  of  life  in  the  Heavens.  .  .  I  have  been 
instructed  concerning  these  degrees  of  life,  that  the 
ultimate  degree  of  life  is  what  is  called  the  external  or 
natural  man  .  .  .  that  the  second  degree  is  what  is 
called  the  internal  or  rational  man  .  .  .  and  that  the 
third  degree  of  life,  which  is  entirely  unknown  to  man, 
is  that  through  which  the  Lord  flows  into  the  rational 
mind,  whence  he  has  the  capacity  of  thinking  as  a  man, 
and  whence  he  has  conscience,  and  the  perception  of  good 
and  truth,  and  also  elevation  by  the  Lord  to  Himself. 

3952.  The  heavenly  marriage  is  not  between  good  and 
truth  of  one  and  the  same  degree,  but  between  good  and 
truth  of  a  lower  degree  and  of  a  higher  one.  Ex. 

2.  The  celestial  man  is  in  a  higher  degree  (than 

the  spiritual). 

39944.  In  the  Original  Language,  'lamb'  is  expressed 
by  various  words,  whereby  are  signified  the  different 
degrees  of  innocence. 

4121.  All  who  are  in  goods  and  truths  are  in  brother- 
hood ;  but  still  there  are  degrees  according  to  the 
quality  of  the  goods  and  truths ;  these  degrees  are 
signified  by  'brothers,'  'sisters,'  etc. 

4154.  The  goods  and  truths  of  the  internal  man  are 
of  threefold  degrees,  such  as  exist  in  the  three  Heavens  ; 
and  the  goods  and  truths  of  the  external  man  are  also 
of  threefold  degrees,  and  correspond  to  the  internal 
ones ;  for  there  are  intermediate  goods  and  truths 
between  the  internal  and  the  external  man  .  .  .  there  are 
goods  and  truths  proper  to  the  natural  man  .  .  .  and 
there  are  sensuous  goods  and  truths  .  .  .  These  goods 
and  truths  of  threefold  degrees  pertain  to  the  external 
man,  and  correspond  to  so  many  goods  and  truths  of  the 
internal  man  .  .  .  The  goods  and  truths  of  all  the  degrees 
are  entirely  distinct  from  each  other  .  .  .  those  which 
are  interior  are  component,  and  those  which  are  exterior 
are  composite  .  .  . 


Degree 


53 


Degree 


42S62.  The  First  Heaven  is  also  celestial  and  spiritual, 
but  not  in  the  same  degree  as  the  former  ones  .  .  . 

443410.  (Correspondence  of  the  forbidden  degrees  in 
marriage. ) 

44596.  He  who  is  spiritual  in  an  interior  degree, 
regards  intelligence  and  wisdom  as  a  mediate  end  .  .  . 

44S23.  They  who  are  in  a  like  degree  of  good,  are  also 
in  a  like  degree  of  truth  .  .  . 

4592s.  All  things  of  the  Church,  from  the  first  degree 
to  the  last.  Sig. 

500S3.  (Such)  hold  everyone  to  be  the  neighbour,  yet 
all  in  a  different  respect  and  degree  .  .  .  whereas  (such) 
do  not  allow  of  degrees  and  respect. 

51143.  There  are  degrees  (or  steps)  as  of  a  ladder 
between  the  Intellectual  and  the  Sensuous  ;  but  no  one 
can  apprehend  these  degrees,  unless  he  knows  .  .  .  that 
they  are  perfectly  distinct  from  each  other,  and  in  fact 
so  distinct,  that  the  interior  ones  can  come  into  existence 
and  subsist  without  the  exterior  ones,  but  not  the 
exterior  ones  without  the  interior  (51462);  as,  for 
example,  the  spirit  of  man  can  subsist  without  the 
material  body  .  .  .  the  spirit  of  man  being  in  an  interior 
degree,  and  the  body  in  an  exterior  one.  The  case  is 
the  same  with  the  Spirit  of  man  after  death,  if  he  is 
among  the  blest :  he  is  in  the  ultimate  degree  there 
when  he  is  in  the  First  Heaven,  in  the  interior  degree 
when  in  the  Second,  and  in  the  inmost  when  in  the 
Third  :  when  he  is  in  this  last,  he  is  at  the  same  time 
in  all  the  rest,  but  they  are  quiescent  with  him,  almost 
as  the  Corporeal  is  quiescent  during  sleep,  only  with  the 
difference  that  the  interiors  with  the  Angels  are  then  in 
the  highest  state  of  wakefulness.  There  also  exist  with 
man  the  same  number  of  distinct  degrees  as  there  are 
of  Heavens,  besides  the  ultimate,  which  is  the  body  with 
its  sensuous  things.  Hence  it  is  evident  how  the  case  is 
with  the  derivations  from  first  to  last  (which  are  signi- 
fied by  the  'three  shoots  of  the  vine'),  or  from  the 
Intellectual  to  the  Sensuous.  The  life  of  man,  which  is 
from  the  Divine  of  the  Lord,  passes  through  these 
degrees  from  the  inmost  to  the  ultimate,  and  according 
to  its  derivation  it  becomes  more  and  more  general,  and 
in  the  ultimate  most  general ;  the  derivations  into  lower 
degrees  are  only  compositions,  or  rather  conformations 
of  the  singulars  and  particulars  of  the  higher  degrees  in 
succession,  with  such  things  added  from  purer  nature, 
and  then  from  grosser,  as  may  serve  for  containing 
vessels  ;  on  the  dissolution  of  which  vessels,  the  singulars 
and  particulars  of  the  interior  degrees,  which  had  been 
conformed  therein,  return  to  the  degree  next  higher  .  .  . 

5144.  'Three  baskets '  =  the  successives  of  voluntary 
things  .  .  .  for  there  are  degrees  (or  steps)  as  of  a  ladder 
from  inmost  things  to  outermost  ones  ;  into  the  inmost 
there  flows  in  good  from  the  Lord,  and  this  flows  through 
the  Rational  into  the  interior  Natural,  and  thence  into 
the  exterior  Natural  or  Sensuous,  distinctly,  as  it  were 
by  the  steps  of  a  ladder,  and  in  every  degree  it  is 
qualified  according  to  the  reception.     5147. 

51452.  The  interiors  with  man  are  distinguished  into 
degrees,  and  in  each  degree  there  are  terminated  things, 
and,  by  the  termination,  they  are  separated  from  the 
lower  degree  ;  thus  it  is  from  the  inmost  to  the  outer- 


most. The  interior  Rational  constitutes  the  first  degree, 
in  which  are  the  Celestial  Angels,  or  the  Third  Heaven  ; 
the  exterior  Rational  constitutes  the  second  degree,  in 
which  are  the  Spiritual  Angels,  or  the  Second  Heaven  ; 
the  interior  Natural  constitutes  the  third  degree,  in 
which  are  good  Spirits,  or  the  First  Heaven ;  the 
exterior  Natural  or  Sensuous  constitutes  the  fourth 
degree,  in  which  is  man.  These  degrees  with  man  are 
perfectly  distinct  .  .  .  Hence  if  a  man  has  lived  the  life 
of  charity  and  love,  he  can  after  death  be  translated 
into  the  Third  Heaven  ;  but,  in  order  for  him  to  be  of 
such  a  character,  it  is  necessary  for  all  the  degrees  with 
him  to  be  well  terminated,  and  thus  by  terminations  to 
be  distinct  from  each  other.  When  this  is  the  case, 
each  degree  is  a  plane,  in  which  the  good  that  flows  in 
from  the  Lord  rests  and  is  received.  Without  these 
degrees  as  planes,  the  good  is  not  received,  but  flows 
through  as  through  a  sieve  .  .  .  down  to  the  Sensuous 
and  there  ...  is  turned  into  what  is  filthy. 

4.  See  Boun DKKY-terrninatio,  at  this  ref. 

51462.  What  is  purer  and  what  is  grosser  may  exist  in 
one  and  the  same  degree,  according  to  both  extension 
and  compression,  and  according  to  determinations,  and 
also  according  to  the  insertion  of  things  homogeneous  or 
heterogeneous. 

52362.  By  the  'suckling,'  'little  child,'  and  'child,'  are 
signified  three  degrees  of  innocence  .  .  .  and  as  three 
degrees  of  innocence  are  signified  by  them,  so  also  are 
three  degrees  of  love  and  charity  .  .  . 

5605.  'We  will  arise,  and  go,  and  we  will  live,  and 
not  die '  =  spiritual  life  according  to  degrees.  Ex. 

5934e.  By  such  degrees  of  scientifics,  man  ascends  to 
intelligence ;  for,  through  these  degrees,  scientifics 
open  the  mind  .  .  . 

6310.  The  interiors  of  man  are  distinct  according  to 
degrees  by  means  of  derivations  ;  according  to  these 
degrees  there  are  also  lights  .  .  . 

6313s.  The  three  Heavens  are  no  otherwise  distinct 
from  each  other  than  according  to  elevation  to  interior 
things,  thus  according  to  degrees  of  light. 

6326.  There  was  a  philosopher  .  .  .  who  died  a  few 
years  ago,  with  whom  I  spoke  about  the  three  degrees 
of  life  in  man,  saying,  that  man  consists  of  mere  forms 
for  the  reception  of  life,  and  that  one  form  is  more 
interior  than  another,  but  that  one  has  come  into 
existence  and  subsists  from  the  other ;  also,  that  when 
the  lower  or  exterior  form  is  dissolved,  the  higher  or 
interior  one  still  lives. 

6396.  Man  ...  is  first  in  truth  .  .  .  next,  in  the  good 
of  life  from  truth  .  .  .  then,  in  the  good  of  life  from 
good  .  .  .  these  are  the  degrees  (or  steps)  of  regeneration. 

6707.  The  quality  of  Christian  good  determines  in 
what  degree  everyone  is  the  neighbour  .  .  . 

6819.  These  are  the  four  ascending  degrees  of  the 
neighbour  ;  a  society  consisting  of  many  is  in  a  degree 
prior  to  that  of  a  single  man  ;  our  Country  is  in  a  prior 
degree  to  a  society  ;  in  a  still  prior  degree  is  the  Church  ; 
and  in  a  still  prior  degree  is  the  Lord's  Kingdom  ;  but 
in  the  highest  degree  is  the  Lord.  These  ascending 
degrees  are  like  the  steps  of  a  ladder,  at  the  top  of 
which  is  the  Lord. 


Degree 


54 


Degree 


[A.]  7oi4e.  These  were  the  steps  of  the  Lord's  glorifi- 
cation. 

7265.  In  this  chapter  it  treats  of  the  first  three  degrees 
of  vastation.  Enum. 

7295s.  (The  first,  second,  and  third  degrees  of  the 
taking  away  and  deprivation  of  the  influx  of  truth  and 
good.)  Sig. 

7378.  In  this  chapter  it  treats  of  the  third  and  the 
fourth  degree  of  the  vastation  of  those  who  are  in 
falsities,  and  who  iufest  the  upright  in  the  other  life. 
Ex. 

7502.  The  degrees  of  the  vastation  of  those  who  were 
infesting,  were  punishments. 

77ioe.  Hence  it  is  that  there  are  degrees  of  devasta- 
tion, until  at  last  they  are  cast  into  Hell,  which  is  the 
last  of  the  degrees  of  vastation. 

7795.  ' Prodigies '  =  so  many  degrees  of  their  vastation 
.  .  .  The  reason  there  are  so  many  degrees  .  .  . 

S4432.  Truth  Divine  is  not  of  one  degree,  but  of 
many  ;  truth  Divine  in  the  first  degree  and  also  in  the 
second  is  that  which  immediately  proceeds  from  the 
Lord,  and  is  above  the  angelic  understanding ;  truth 
Divine  in  the  third  degree  is  such  as  there  is  in  the 
Third  Heaven  .  .  .  truth  Divine  in  the  fourth  degree  is 
such  as  there  is  in  the  Second  Heaven  .  .  .  truth  Divine 
in  the  fifth  degree  is  such  as  there  is  in  the  First 
Heaven  .  .  .  and  truth  Divine  in  the  sixth  degree  is 
such  as  there  is  with  man,  accommodated  to  his  per- 
ception ;  thus  is  the  sense  of  the  letter  of  the  Word. 

86o3e.  The  passings  over  from  one  to  another  in 
successive  order  are  also  called  degrees. 

8641.  Truth  in  the  first  degree  is  represented  by 
'Moses' ;  and  the  truths  thence  derived  in  sucessive 
order,  by  'the  princes  of  thousands,'  'of  hundreds,'  'of 
fifties,'  and  'of  tens.' 

8643.  When  the  son-in-law  represents  truth,  the 
father-in-law  represents  good,  in  a  higher  degree  .  .  . 

S707.  'Way'  is  predicated  of  the  understanding  of 
truth  ;  here,  in  an  interior  degree,  because  .  .  . 

8712.  'Princes  of  thousands' =  the  primary  things 
which  are  in  the  first  degree  under  truth  immediately 
from  the  Divine  .  .  .  (these)  are  in  a  more  dignified  degree 
than  they  who  are  over  few  ;  here,  therefore  (it  means) 
those  who  were  in  the  first  degree,  for  they  who  were 
in  a  lower  degree  were  princes  of  hundreds,  of  fifties, 
and  of  tens. 

8713.  Primary  things  in  the  second  degree.  Sig. 

8714.  Intermediates  between  those  truths  from  good 
which  are  in  the  second  degree,  and  those  which  are  in 
the  third.  Sig. 

8715.  'Tens'  also = many  things,  but  in  a  less  degree. 
8872.  These  things  are  such  as  are  in  the  sensuous 

Corporeal,  as  is  evident  from  the  successive  degrees  of 
the  light  which  is  of  the  Intellectual  in  man  ;  in  the 
first  degree  with  man  are  those  things  which  are  in 
spiritual  light,  signified  by  'the  things  in  the  heavens 
above;'  in  the  second  degree  are  those  things  which  are 
in  natural  light,  signified  by  'the  things  in  the  earth 
beneath;'    and  in  the   third   degree  are  those  things 


which  are  in  the  sensuous  Corporeal,  signified  by  'the 
things  in  the  waters  under  the  earth.' 

8945.  'Thou  shalt  not  go  up  by  steps  unto  Mine 
altar'  (Ex.xx.23)=non-elevation  to  the  interior  things 
which  are  celestial.  .  .  '  To  go  up  by  steps '  =  to  elevate 
one's  self  to  higher  or  to  interior  things. 

2.  No  one  in  the  other  life  is  allowed  to  be  elevated 

higher  into  Heaven  than  to  the  degree  of  good  in  which 
he  is  .  .  . 

6.  It  is  said  'to  go  up  by  steps,'  because,  in  the 

World  of  Spirits,  elevation  to  interior  things  .  .  .  appears 
as  an  ascent  by  steps  ;  hence  it  was  that  Jacob  in  his 
sleep  saw  Angels  ascending  to  the  Lord  by  the  steps  of 
a  ladder;  therefore,  too,  in  the  Word,  'steps' =  an 
ascent  to  higher,  that  is,  to  interior  things,  as  in  Ezek. 
xl.6,22, 26,31, 34 ;  and  in  Amos;  'The  Lord  Jehovih 
Zebaoth  builds  His  steps  in  the  heavens'  (ix.6). 

92S62.  The  successive  steps  of  deliverance  from  dam- 
nation are  circumstanced  as  are  the  successive  steps  of 
regeneration.  Sig.  and  Ex. 

9336.  '  By  little  and  little  I  will  drive  them  out  from 
before  thee '  =  the  removal  (of  evils  and  falsities)  by 
degrees  according  to  order.  Ex. 

9435.  The  degrees  of  ascent  from  the  people  to  the 
Lord  are  thus  described. 

2.  There   are  like   degrees   of   ascent   from   the 

world  to  Heaven  with  those  who  are  being  regenerated 
by  the  Lord  .  .  . 

94S9.  'A  cubit  and  a  half  the  height  thereof '  =  what 
is  full  as  to  degrees.  '  Height  '  =  degrees  as  to  good  and 
as  to  truth.     . 

e.  The  reason  '  height '  =  degrees  as  to  good  and 

thence  as  to  truth,  is  also  because  what  is  high  =  what 
is  internal,  and  good  is  perfect  according  to  degrees 
towards  interior  things. 

9594.  The  reason  there  are  three  Heavens,  is  that 
there  are  three  degrees  of  life  with  man  .  .  .  the  inmost 
degree  of  his  life  is  for  the  inmost  Heaven  ;  the  middle 
degree  of  life  is  for  the  middle  Heaven  ;  and  the  ultimate 
one  is  for  the  ultimate  Heaven  .  .  . 

-.  These  degrees  of  life  with   man  are  opened 

successively ;  the  first  degree  by  a  life  according  to 
what  is  fair  and  just ;  the  second  degree  by  a  life 
according  to  the  truths  of  faith  from  the  Word  and 
according  to  the  goods  of  charity  towards  the  neighbour 
therefrom  ;  and  the  third  degree  according  to  the  good 
of  mutual  love  and  the  good  of  love  to  the  Lord  ;  these 
are  the  means  by  which  are  successively  opened  these 
three  degrees  of  life  with  man,  thus  the  three  Heavens 
with  him.  But  in  proportion  as  man  recedes  from  the 
good  of  life,  and  accedes  to  evil  of  life,  these  degrees  are 
closed  .  .  . 

9659^  Truths  leading  to  good  and  from  good  to  truths 
are  signified  by  'the  porch,'  and  by  'the  steps'  (Ezek.xl). 

9773.  'The  height  five  cubits '  =  degrees  of  good  and 
truth  also  as  much  as  is  sufficient.  '  Height '  =  degrees 
as  to  rgood  ;  and  as  it  is  predicated  of  the  ultimate 
Heaven,  it  also  =  degrees  as  to  truth,  for  that  Heaven 
is  in  the  good  and  truth  of  faith. 

e.  Distances  from  the  inmost  are  degrees  of  good 

and  truth  from  the  Lord. 


Degree 


55 


Degree 


9825.  As  the  Spiritual  Kingdom  is  distinguished  into 
three  degrees,  into  the  inmost,  middle,  and  external, 
'the  robe '  =  that  which  is  in  the  middle  of  this  Kingdom. 
The  reason  this  Kingdom  is  distinguished  into  three 
degrees,  is  that  the  inmost  there  communicates  with 
the  Celestial,  and  the  external  with  the  Natural,  and 
therefore  the  middle  draws  equally  from  both.  For 
anything  to  be  perfect,  it  must  be  distinguished  into 
three  degrees  ;  such  is  the  case  with  Heaven,  and  with 
the  goods  and  truths  there.  That  there  are  three 
Heavens  is  known,  thus  there  are  three  degrees 
of  goods  and  truths  there.  Each  Heaven,  too,  is 
distinguished  into  three  degrees ;  for  the  inmost  of  it 
communicates  immediately  with  the  higher  one,  the 
external  with  the  lower  one,  and  therefore  the  middle 
with  both  ;  hence  its  perfection.  The  case  is  the  same 
with  the  interiors  of  man,  which,  in  general,  are  distin- 
guished into  three  degrees,  namely,  into  the  Celestial, 
the  Spiritual,  and  the  Natural.  In  like  manner,  each 
of  these  is  distinguished  into  its  own  three  degrees  ;  for 
the  man  who  is  in  the  good  of  faith  and  of  love  to  the 
Lord,  is  a  Heaven  in  the  least  form  corresponding  to 
the  Grand  one.  Such,  also,  is  the  case  with  all  things 
of  nature  ;  that  the  Natural  of  man  is  distinguished  into 
three  degrees,  see  4570.  .  .  The  reason  it  is  so,  is  that 
everywhere  there  are  end,  cause,  and  effect .  .  .  and  hence 
it  is  that '  three '  =  what  is  complete  from  beginning  to  end. 

9940.  These  are  the  degrees  of  the  influx  and  the 
reception  of  the  Divine ;  but  every  degree  contains 
innumerable  things,  which  are  distinct  from  those  which 
are  in  every  other  degree  ;  and  the  innumerable  things 
therein  are  the  arcana  of  Heaven,  few  of  which  fall 
within  the  human  understanding  .  .  .  The  arcana  of 
permission  are  few  relatively  to  those  of  the  higher 
degrees,  which  are  the  things  which  take  place  from 
leave,  from  good-pleasure,  and  from  will. 

1013212.  These  three  degrees  of  innocence  are  signified 
by  'a  bullock,'  'a  ram,'  and  'a  lamb'  .  .  . 

10181.  'Two  cubits  the  height  thereof'  =  the  degrees 
of  good  and  truth,  and  their  conjunction.  .  .  '  Height '  = 
the  degrees  of  good  and  thence  of  truth.  By  degrees 
of  height  are  meant  degrees  from  interiors  to  exteriors, 
or  from  inmosts  to  outermosts. 

2.  There  are  two  kinds  of  degrees,  degrees  in 

length  and  breadth,  and  degrees  as  to  height  and 
depth  ;  the  latter  degrees  differ  very  greatly  from  the 
former  ones  ;  the  degrees  of  length  and  breadth  are 
those  which  succeed  each  other  from  the  middle  to  the 
circumferences  ;  but  the  degrees  of  height  proceed  from 
interiors  to  exteriors  ;  the  former  degrees,  namely,  those 
of  length  and  breadth,  are  degrees  which  continually 
decrease  from  the  middle  towards  the  circumferences,  as 
light  decreases  from  the  flame  .  .  .  Whereas  the  degrees 
of  height,  which  proceed  from  inmosts  to  outermosts,  or 
from  highests  to  lowests,  are  not  continuous,  but  discrete ; 
they  are  circumstanced  as  are  the  inmost  things  of  a 
seed  relatively  to  its  exteriors  .  .  .  These  degrees  are 
discriminated,  thus  are  distinct,  as  the  thing  producing 
and  the  thing  produced.  The  things  which  are  in  an 
interior  degree,  are  more  perfect  than  those  which  are 
in  an  exterior  degree,  and  there  is  no  likeness  between 
them,  except  through  correspondences  .  .  . 


4.  He  who  does  not  acquire  a  perception  of  these 

degrees,  can  know  nothing  whatever  of  the  differences 
between  the  Heavens,  and  between  the  interior  and  the 
exterior  faculties  of  man,  thus  between  the  soul  and  the 
body  ;  he  is  also  utterly  unable  to  apprehend  what  the 
internal  sense  of  the  Word  is,  and  its  difference  from 
the  external  sense  ;  and  not  even  the  difference  between 
the  Spiritual  World  and  the  natural  world ;  being,  in 
fact,  not  able  to  understand  what  and  whence  are  corre- 
spondences and  representatives,  and  scarcely  what  influx 
is.  Sensuous  men  do  not  apprehend  these  differences  ; 
for  they  make  increase  and  decrease  according  to  these 
degrees  continuous,  thus  they  make  these  degrees  like 
the  degrees  of  length  and  breadth,  wherefore  they  stand 
outside,  far  from  intelligence.     H.383.  J.(Post.)309. 

H.  3ie.  The  spiritual  natural  and  celestial  natural 
Angels  are  distinct  from  each  other,  yet  constitute  only 
one  Heaven,  because  they  are  in  one  degree. 

33.  There  are  three  degrees  of  the  interiors  with  every- 
one, both  Angel  and  Spirit,  and  also  with  man  ;  they  with 
whom  the  third  degree  is  open,  are  in  the  inmost 
Heaven ;  they  with  whom  the  second,  or  only  the  first 
is  open,  are  in  the  middle  or  in  the  ultimate  Heaven  : 
the  interiors  are  opened  by  the  reception  of  Divine  good 
and  Divine  truth.  (See  Third  Heaven  at  this  ref.) 

(q).  There  are  as  many  degrees  of  life  in  man  as  there 
are  Heavens,  and  they  are  opened  after  death  according 
to  his  life.  Refs. 

34.  As,  with  the  Angels  of  the  inmost  Heaven,  the 
interiors  are  opened  into  the  third  degree,  their  perfec- 
tion vastly  surpasses  that  of  the  Angels  in  the  middle 
Heaven,  whose  interiors  are  opened  into  the  second 
degree  .  .  . 

38.  He  who  does  not  know  how  the  case  is  with 
Divine  order  as  to  degrees,  cannot  apprehend  in  what 
way  the  Heavens  are  distinct  from  each  other,  nor,  in 
fact,  what  the  internal  and  the  external  man  are  .  .  . 
There  are  two  kinds  of  degrees,  there  are  continuous 
degrees,  and  there  are  degrees  not  continuous  ;  con- 
tinuous degrees  are  circumstanced  as  are  the  degrees  of 
the  decrease  of  light  from  the  flame  down  to  darkness, 
or  as  the  degrees  of  the  decrease  of  sight  from  those 
things  which  are  in  light  to  those  which  are  in  shade, 
or  as  the  degrees  of  purity  of  the  atmosphere  from  the 
bottom  of  it  to  the  top ;  it  is  distances  that  determine 
these  degrees.  Whereas  degrees  not  continuous,  but 
discrete,  are  discriminated  as  are  the  prior  and  the 
posterior,  as  the  cause  and  the  effect,  and  as  the  thing 
producing  and  the  thing  produced.  He  who  investigates 
the  matter,  will  see  that  in  each  and  all  things  in  the 
universal  world,  whatsoever  they  may  be,  there  are 
such  degrees  of  production  and  of  composition  ;  that  is 
to  say,  that  from  one  [is  formed]  a  second,  and  from  the 
second  a  third,  and  so  on. 

39.  With  every  Angel,  and  also  with  every  man, 
there  is  an  inmost  or  highest  degree,  or  an  inmost  or 
highest  something,  into  which  the  Divine  of  the  Lord 
first  or  proximately  inflows,  and  from  which  it  disposes 
the  rest  of  the  interiors  which  succeed  each  other  accord- 
ing to  the  degrees  of  order  ...  By  this  inmost  or 
highest  man  is  man,  and  is  distinguished  from  the  brute 
animals,  for  they  have  it  not.     Hence  it  is,  that  man, 


Degree 


56 


Degree 


differently  from  animals,  as  to  all  the  interiors  of  his 
mind  and  disposition  can  be  elevated  by  the  Lord  to 
Himself,  can  believe  in  Him,  be  affected  with  love  to 
Him,  and  thus  see  Him,  and  can  also  receive  intelligence 
and  wisdom,  and  speak  from  reason  ;  hence,  too,  it  is, 
that  he  lives  to  eternity.     J.  25s. 

[H.]  104.  See  Correspondekce  at  this  ref. 

120.  The  Lord  as  a  Sun  does  not  flow  in  immediately 
into  the  Heavens,  but  the  ardour  of  His  love  is  tempered 
on  the  way  by  means  of  degrees  ;  the  temperings  appear 
as  radiant  belts  round  the  sun. 

146.  The  distance  between  the  Sun  and  the  Moon 
there,  is  thirty  degrees ;  consequently,  the  distance 
between  the  [two  sets  of]  quarters  is  the  same.     E.4224. 

208.  In  every  Angel  there  are  three  degrees  of  life, 
as  there  are  three  degrees  of  Heaven  ;  with  those  who 
are  in  the  inmost  Heaven,  the  third  or  inmost  degree  is 
open,  and  the  second  and  first  are  closed  ;  with  those 
who  are  in  the  middle  Heaven,  the  second  degree  is 
open,  and  the  first  and  third  are  closed  ;  and  with  those 
who  are  in  the  ultimate  Heaven,  the  first  degree  is  open, 
and  the  second  and  third  are  closed.  As  soon,  therefore, 
as  an  Angel  of  the  Third  Heaven  looks  down  into  a 
Society  of  the  Second,  and  speaks  with  anyone  there, 
his  third  degree  is  closed,  and  then  he  is  bereaved  of  his 
wisdom,  because  his  wisdom  resides  in  his  third  degree, 
and  he  has  none  in  the  second  or  first.  Sig. 

211.  In  the  inmost  Heaven  (the  form  of  Heaven)  is 
the  most  perfect  of  all ;  in  the  middle  Heaven  it  is  also 
perfect,  but  in  a  lower  degree ;  and  in  the  ultimate 
Heaven  in  a  still  lower  one  ;  and  the  form  of  one  Heaven 
subsists  from  that  of  another  Heaven  through  influx 
from  the  Lord.  But  the  nature  of  communication  by 
influx  is  not  comprehended,  unless  the  nature  of  degrees 
of  height  is  known,  and  what  the  difference  is  between 
these  degrees  and  the  degrees  of  length  and  breadth. 

267.  "With  every  Angel  there  are  three  degrees  of 
life,  which  correspond  to  the  three  Heavens  ;  those  with 
whom  the  first  degree  is  open  are  in  the  First  Heaven  ; 
those  with  whom  the  second  degree  is  open  are  in  the 
Second  Heaven  ;  and  those  with  whom  the  third  degree 
is  open  are  in  the  Third  Heaven  ;  according  to  these 
degrees  is  the  wisdom  of  the  Angels  in  the  Heavens.  .  . 
The  reason  there  are  such  great  differences  (in  their 
wisdom),  is  that  those  things  which  are  in  a  higher 
degree  are  singulars,  and  those  which  are  in  a  lower 
degree  are  generals  .  .  . 

2.  The  sensuous   Corporeals  of  man   are  in  the 

lowest  degree. 

270.  The  wisdom  of  the  Angels  of  the  Third  Heaven 
is  incomprehensible,  even  to  those  who  are  in  the 
ultimate  Heaven  ;  the  reason  is,  that  the  interiors  of 
the  Angels  of  the  Third  Heaven  are  open  to  the  third 
degree,  whereas  those  of  the  Angels  of  the  First  Heaven 
are  only  open  to  the  first  degree  ...  As  the  interiors  of 
the  Angels  of  the  Third  Heaven  are  open  to  the  third 
degree,  Divine  truths  are  as  it  were  inscribed  on  them, 
for  the  interiors  of  the  third  degree  are  more  in  the  form 
of  Heaven  than  those  of  the  second  and  the  first  degree, 
and  the  form  of  Heaven  is  from  Divine  truth  .  .  . 

271.  Love  to  the  Lord  opens  the  interiors  of  the  mind 
to  the  third  degree  .  .  . 


280.  The  Heavens  are  distinguished  according  to 
innocence  ;  they  who  are  in  the  First  Heaven  are  in 
innocence  of  the  first  or  ultimate  degree  ;  they  who  are 
in  the  Second  Heaven  are  in  innocence  of  the  second  or 
middle  degree  ;  and  they  who  are  in  the  Third  Heaven 
are  in  innocence  of  the  third  or  inmost  degree. 

28S2.  The  Angels  of  the  Third  Heaven  are  in  the 
third  or  inmost  degree  of  peace,  because  they  are  in  the 
third  or  inmost  degree  of  innocence  ;  and  the  Angels  of 
the  lower  Heavens  are  in  a  less  degree  of  peace,  because 
they  are  in  a  less  degree  of  innocence. 

349.  Whatever  a  man  acquires  in  the  world,  remains 
and  is  carried  with  him  after  death,  when,  also,  it  is 
increased  and  becomes  full,  but  within  the  degree  of  his 
affection  and  desire  of  truth  and  its  good  .  .  . 

410.  Hence  it  is  evident,  not  only  that  there  are 
degrees  of  the  joys  of  Heaven,  but  also  that  the  inmost 
of  one  hardly  approaches  the  ultimate  or  middle  of 
another. 

468s.  There  are  three  degrees  of  life  with  every  man  ; 
the  Rational  is  opened  to  the  first  degree  by  civil  truths  ; 
to  the  second  degree  by  moral  truths  ;  and  to  the  third 
degree  by  spiritual  truths.  The  Rational,  however,  is 
not  formed  and  opened  by  these  truths  merely  by  man's 
knowing  them,  but  by  his  living  according  to  them  .  .  . 
When  truths  are  mere  servants  (to  selfish  ends)  they  do 
not  enter  into  man,  and  open  any  degree  of  his  life, 
even  the  first  .  .  .  Man,  therefore,  becomes  rational  to 
the  third  degree  by  the  spiritual  love  of  the  good  and 
truth  which  are  of  Heaven  and  the  Church ;  to  the 
second  degree  by  the  love  of  what  is  sincere  and  right ; 
and  to  the  first  degree  by  the  love  of  what  is  just  and 
fair. 

S.  6"2.  Hence  it  follows,  that  the  Divine  which  proceeds 
from  the  Lord  to  its  ultimates,  descends  through  three 
degrees,  and  is  named  the  Celestial,  the  Spiritual,  and 
the  Natural.  The  Divine  which  descends  from  the  Lord 
to  men,  descends  through  these  three  degrees,  and  when 
it  has  descended,  it  contains  these  three  degrees  within 
it :  everything  Divine  is  of  this  character ;  therefore, 
when  it  is  in  its  ultimate  degree,  it  is  in  its  fulness. 
Such  is  the  "Word. 

7.  The  difference  between  these  degrees  cannot  be 
known  unless  correspondence  is  known ;  for  these 
degrees  are  entirely  distinct  from  each  other,  as  are  the 
end,  the  cause,  and  the  effect ;  or  as  the  prior,  the 
posterior,  and  the  postreme  ;  but  they  make  one  through 
correspondences. 

68.  In  every  man  from  creation  there  are  three  degrees 
of  life,  celestial,  spiritual,  and  natural ;  but  man  is  in 
the  natural  so  long  as  he  is  in  the  world,  and  so  far  in 
the  spiritual  as  he  is  in  genuine  truths,  and  so  far  in 
the  celestial  as  he  is  in  a  life  according  to  them  ;  but 
still  he  does  not  come  into  the  spiritual  itself  or  the 
celestial  itself  until  after  death.     T.239. 

W.  65.  The  uses  of  all  things  which  are  created 
ascend  through  degrees  from  ultimates  to  man,  and 
through  man  to  God  the  Creator.  Gen. art.  .  .  .  Ulti- 
mates are  all  things  of  the  mineral  kingdom  .  .  .  Mediates 
are  all  things  of  the  vegetable  kingdom  .  .  .  Primes  are 
all  things  of  the  animal  kingdom  ...     1 7<De. 


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57 


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66.  There  are  three  degrees  of  ascent  in  the  natural 
world,  and  there  are  three  degrees  of  ascent  in  the 
Spiritual  World.  .  .  The  more  perfect  animals  are  recipi- 
ents of  the  three  degrees  of  life  of  the  natural  world  ; 
the  less  perfect  are  recipients  of  the  life  of  two  degrees 
of  that  world  ;  and  the  imperfect  ones  are  recipients  of 
one  of  its  degrees.  But  man  alone  is  a  recipient  of  the 
life,  not  only  of  the  three  degrees  of  the  natural  world, 
but  also  of  the  three  degrees  of  the  Spiritual  World. 
Hence  it  is,  that,  unlike  any  animal,  man  can  be  elevated 
above  nature  ;  can  think  analytically  and  rationally  .  .  . 
But  these  six  degrees  .  .  .  will  be  treated  of .  .  . 

67.  How  man  ascends  from  the  ultimate  degree  to 
the  first.  He  is  born  into  the  ultimate  degree  of  the 
natural  world  ;  he  is  then  elevated  by  knowledges  into 
the  second  degree  ;  and  as  he  perfects  his  understanding 
by  knowledges,  he  is  elevated  into  the  third  degree,  and 
then  becomes  rational.  The  three  degrees  of  ascent  in 
the  Spiritual  World  are  in  him  above  the  three  natural 
degrees,  but  they  do  not  appear  until  he  puts  off  the 
earthly  body.  When  he  puts  this  off,  the  first  spiritual 
degree  is  opened  to  him,  afterwards  the  second,  and  at 
last  the  third  ;  but  only  with  those  who  become  Angels 
of  the  Third  Heaven  .  .  .  Those  become  Angels  of  the 
Second  and  the  Ultimate  Heaven,  with  whom  the  second 
and  the  ultimate  degree  can  be  opened.  Each  spiritual 
degree  is  opened  with  man  according  to  the  reception 
of  the  Divine  love  and  the  Divine  wisdom  from  the 
Lord  ;  they  who  receive  something  thereof  come  into 
the  first  or  ultimate  spiritual  degree  ;  they  who  receive 
more,  into  the  second  or  middle  spiritual  degree ; 
and  they  who  receive  much,  into  the  third  or  highest 
degree.  But  they  who  receive  nothing  thereof  remain 
in  the  natural  degrees,  and  from  the  spiritual  degrees 
draw  only  this,  that  they  are  able  to  think  and  thence 
to  speak,  and  to  will  and  thence  to  act,  but  not  intelli- 
gently. 

7 12.  Instead  of  height  (the  spiritual  man)  thinks  of 
the  degrees  (of  good  and  truth). 

94.  The  decreasing  (of  spiritual  heat  and  light)  is 
effected  through  degrees. 

104.  The  Sun  .  .  .  appears  above  the  lands  on  which 
the  Angels  dwell,  at  an  elevation  of  about  45  degrees  .  .  . 

179.  There  are  degrees  of  love  and  wisdom,  and  thence 
degrees  of  heat  and  light,  also  degrees  of  atmospheres. 
Gen.  art. 

.  That  there  are  degrees  of  love  and  wisdom  may 

be  evident  from  the  Angels  of  the  three  Heavens  .  .  . 
The  degrees  of  love  and  wisdom  distinguish  and  separate 
them  .  .  . 

180.  That  there  exist  degrees  of  love  and  wisdom  may 
be  still  more  evident  from  the  love  and  wisdom  of  the 
Angels  relatively  to  the  love  and  wisdom  of  men  .  .  . 

181.  As  there  are  degrees  of  love  and  wisdom,  there 
are  also  degrees  of  (spiritual)  heat  and  light  .  .  . 

182.  The  degrees  of  spiritual  heat  cannot  be  described 
from  experience  .  .  .  but  the  degrees  of  spiritual  light 
can  be  described  .  .  .  From  the  degrees  of  light  the 
degrees  of  spiritual  heat  even  can  be  comprehended  ;  for 
they  are  in  a  like  degree  .  .  . 

183.  As  the  atmospheres  are  the  receptacles  and  con- 


tainants  of  heat  and  light,  it  follows  that  there  are  as 
many  degrees  of  atmospheres  as  there  are  degrees  of 
heat  and  light,  and  also  that  there  are  as  many  as  there 
are  degrees  of  love  and  wisdom  .  .  . 

184.  Degrees  are  of  a  twofold  kind,  degrees  of  height 
and  degrees  of  breadth.  Gen.  art. 

.  The  knowledge  of  degrees  is   like   a  key  for 

opening  the  causes  of  things  .  .  .  Without  this  know- 
ledge, scarcely  anything  of  Cause  can  be  known  .  .  .  The 
interior  things  which  are  not  open  to  view  can  in  no 
way  be  discovered  unless  degrees  are  known.  For 
exterior  things  pass  to  interior  ones,  and  through  these 
to  inmost  ones,  through  degrees ;  not  through  con- 
tinuous degrees,  but  through  discrete  degrees.  The 
gradual  lessenings  or  decreasings  from  grosser  to  finer, 
or  from  denser  to  rarer,  are  called  continuous  degrees  ; 
or  rather  [they  are]  as  the  gradual  additions  and  increas- 
ings  from  finer  to  grosser,  or  from  rarer  to  denser ; 
exactly  as  it  is  with  [the  gradations]  of  light  to  shade, 
or  of  heat  to  cold. 

.  But  discrete  degrees  are  entirely  different ;  they 

are  as  things  prior,  posterior,  and  postreme  ;  or  as  end, 
cause,  and  effect.  These  degrees  are  called  discrete, 
because  the  prior  is  by  itself,  the  posterior  is  by  itself, 
and  the  postreme  is  by  itself ;  yet  taken  together  they 
make  one.  The  atmospheres  .  .  .  from  the  sun  to  the 
earth  .  .  .  are  discrete  in  such  degrees  ;  and  are  as 
simples,  as  congregates  of  these,  and  again  as  congregates 
of  these,  which  taken  together  are  called  a  composite. 
These  degrees  are  discrete  because  they  come  into  exist- 
ence distinctly,  and  they  are  meant  by  the  degrees  of 
height ;  whereas  the  former  degrees  are  continuous, 
because  they  increase  continuously,  and  are  meant  by 
the  degrees  of  breadth. 

185.  Each  and  all  things  which  come  into  existence 
in  the  Spiritual  World  and  in  the  natural  world  come 
into  existence  conjointly  from  discrete  degrees  and  at 
the  same  time  from  continuous  degrees,  that  is,  from 
degrees  of  height  and  from  degrees  of  breadth.  That 
dimension  which  consists  of  discrete  degrees  is  called 
height,  and  that  which  consists  of  continuous  degrees  is 
called  breadth  :  their  position  relatively  to  the  sight  of 
the  eye  does  not  alter  the  designation.  Without  a 
knowledge  of  these  degrees,  nothing  can  be  known 
about  the  differences  between  the  three  Heavens,  nor 
about  the  differences  between  the  love  and  wisdom  of 
the  Angels  there,  nor  about  the  differences  between  the 
heat  and  light  in  which  they  are,  nor  about  the  differ- 
ences between  the  atmospheres  which  environ  and  hold 
together.  Further,  without  a  knowledge  of  these 
degrees,  nothing  can  be  known  about  the  differences 
between  the  interior  faculties  of  the  mind  in  men,  thus 
nothing  about  their  state  as  to  reformation  and  regene- 
ration ;  nor  about  the  differences  between  the  exterior 
faculties,  which  are  of  the  body,  with  both  Angels  and 
men  ;  and  nothing  at  all  about  the  difference  between 
the  Spiritual  and  the  Natural,  consequently  nothing 
about  correspondence  ;  nay,  nothing  about  any  differ- 
ence of  life  between  men  and  beasts,  nor  about  the 
difference  between  the  more  perfect  and  the  more  imper- 
fect beasts  ;  nor  about  the  differences  among  the  forms 
of  the  vegetable  kingdom,  and  among  the  matters  of  the 
mineral  kingdom.     From  which  it  may  be  evident,  that 


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Degree 


they  who  are  ignorant  of  these  degrees,  cannot  see 
causes  from  any  judgment  .  .  . 

[W.]  1S6.  In  order  to  comprehend  still  better  what  dis- 
crete degrees  are,  what  their  nature  is,  and  how  they  differ 
from  continuous  degrees,  let  the  angelic  Heavens  serve 
for  an  example.  There  are  three  Heavens,  and  they  are 
distinct  by  degrees  of  height  .  .  .  They  do  not  communi- 
cate with  each  other  except  through  influx  .  .  .  But  each 
Heaven  by  itself  is  not  distinct  by  degrees  of  height, 
but  by  degrees  of  breadth  ...  It  is  the  same  with  men  ; 
the  interiors  of  their  minds  are  distinguished  into  the 
same  number  of  degrees  as  the  angelic  Heavens,  and 
one  of  their  degrees  is  above  another  ;  wherefore  the 
interiors  of  men  belonging  to  their  minds  are  distin- 
guished by  discrete  degrees  or  degrees  of  height.  Hence 
it  is  that  a  man  may  be  in  the  lowest  degree,  he  may 
be  in  the  higher,  and  also  in  the  highest  one,  according 
to  the  degree  of  his  wisdom  ;  and  that  when  he  is  only 
in  the  lowest  degree,  the  higher  degree  is  closed  ;  and 
that  it  is  opened  as  he  receives  wisdom  from  the  Lord. 
"With  man,  too,  as  in  Heaven,  there  are  continuous 
degrees,  or  degrees  of  breadth. 

187.  He  who  does  not  know  anything  of  discrete 
degrees  .  .  .  cannot  know  anything  of  the  state  of  man 
as  to  his  reformation  and  regeneration,  which  take  place 
through  the  reception  of  love  and  wisdom  from  the 
Lord,  and  the  consequent  opening  of  the  interior  degrees 
of  the  mind  in  their  order.  Nor  can  he  know  anything 
of  the  influx  through  the  Heavens  from  the  Lord,  nor 
anything  of  the  order  into  which  he  is  created.  For  if 
anyone  thinks  of  these  things,  not  from  discrete  degrees 
.  .  .  but  from  continuous  degrees  ...  he  cannot  see 
anything  about  them  except  from  effects  .  .  . 

188.  I  am  not  aware  whether  anything  has  been 
hitherto  known  about  discrete  degrees  .  .  .  but  only 
about  continuous  degrees ;  yet  not  anything  of  Cause 
in  its  truth  can  become  known  without  a  knowledge  of 
degrees  of  both  kinds. 

189.  The  degrees  of  height  are  homogeneous,  and  the 
one  is  from  the  other  in  succession,  as  are  the  end,  the 
cause,  and  the  effect.  Gen.  art. 

.  As  the  degrees  of  breadth,  or  continuous  ones, 

are  as  those  from  light  to  shade,  from  heat  to  cold, 
from  hard  to  soft,  from  dense  to  rare,  from  gross  to 
fine,  and  so  forth  ;  and  these  degrees  are  known  from 
sensuous  and  ocular  experience  ;  but  not  so  the  degrees 
of  height  or  discrete  degrees  ;  the  latter  will  be  especially 
treated  of  in  this  Part ;  for  without  Knowledge  of  these 
degrees  "causes  cannot  be  seen.  .  .  Hence  it  is,  that 
although  end,  cause,  and  effect  proceed  by  discrete 
degrees,  little,  if  anything,  is  known  in  the  world  about 
these  degrees  .  .  . 

190.  All  things  ...  of  which  trinal  dimension  is 
predicated,  or  which  are  called  composite,  consist  of 
degrees  of  height.  For  example  .  .  .  every  muscle 
consists  of  least  fibres,  and  these  compounded  fascicu- 
larly  present  the  larger  fibres  which  are  called  motor 
fibres,  and  from  bundles  of  these  there  comes  forth  the 
composite  which  is  called  a  muscle.  It  is  the  same  with 
the  nerves  ...  It  is  the  same  in  all  the  other  combinations 
.  .  .  which  constitute  the  organs  and  viscera  ;  for  these 
are   compositions   of   fibres   and  vessels  variously  put 


together  by  the  like  degrees.  It  is  the  same  in  all 
things  of  the  vegetable  and  in  all  things  of  the  mineral 
kingdom.  In  woods  there  are  combinations  of  filaments 
in  a  threefold  order  ;  in  metals  and  in  stones  there  are 
conglobations  of  parts  also  in  a  threefold  order.  Hence 
is  evident  the  nature  of  discrete  degrees,  namely,  that 
the  second  is  from  the  first,  and  the  third  from  the 
second,  the  third  being  called  the  composite  ;  and  that 
each  degree  is  discrete  from  the  others. 

191.  The  case  is  the  same  with  the  organic  substances 
which  are  the  receptacles  ...  of  the  thoughts  and  affec- 
tions in  the  brains  ;  with  the  atmospheres  ;  with  heat 
and  light ;  and  with  love  and  wisdom.  For  the  atmo- 
spheres are  receptacles  of  heat  and  light ;  and  heat  and 
light  are  receptacles  of  love  and  wisdom.  "Wherefore,  as 
there  are  degrees  of  the  atmospheres,  there  are  also  like 
degrees  of  heat  and  light,  and  like  ones  of  love  and 
wisdom  .  .  . 

192.  That  these  degrees  are  homogeneous,  that  is,  of 
the  same  nature,  is  evident  from  what  has  just  been 
said.  The  motor  fibres  of  the  muscles,  least,  larger,  and 
largest,  are  homogeneous.  The  nervous  fibres,  least, 
larger,  and  largest,  are  homogeneous.  The  filaments  of 
woods  .  .  .  the  parts  of  stones  and  metals  .  .  .  the 
organic  substances  which  are  the  receptacles  ...  of  the 
thoughts  and  affections  .  .  .  the  atmospheres  .  .  .  the 
degrees  of  heat  and  light  in  series,  according  to  the 
degrees  of  the  atmospheres  .  .  .  and  hence  also  the 
degrees  of  love  and  wisdom,  are  homogeneous.  Things 
which  .  .  .  are  heterogeneous  do  not  agree  with  the 
homogeneous,  thus  cannot  present  discrete  degrees 
together  with  them,  but  only  with  their  own  .  .  . 

194.  Each  degree  is  distinct  from  the  others  through 
coA'erings  of  its  own,  and  all  the  degrees  together  are 
distinct  by  means  of  a  general  covering.  The  general 
covering  communicates  with  the  interior  and  with  the 
inmost  things  in  their  order.  Hence  comes  the  con- 
junction of  all,  and  unanimous  action. 

195.  The  first  degree  is  the  all  in  all  things  of  the 
subsequent  degrees.  Gen.  art.  The  reason  is,  that  the 
degrees  of  each  subject  and  of  each  thing  are  homo- 
geneous ;  and  they  are  homogeneous  because  produced 
from  the  first  degree.  For  the  formation  of  these 
degrees  is  such,  that  the  first,  by  confasciculations  or 
conglobations  .  .  .  produces  the  second,  and  through  it 
the  third  ;  and  discretes  each  from  the  other  by  a  cover- 
ing drawn  around  it.  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  the  first 
degree  is  the  principal  and  the  solely  regnant  in  the 
subsequent  degrees  .  .  . 

196.  It  is  said  that  degrees  are  such  in  regard  to  each 
other,  but  the  meaning  is  that  the  substances  are  such 
in  their  degrees.  Speaking  by  degrees  is  abstract 
speaking,  which  is  universal,  and  therefore  applicable 
to  every  subject  or  thing  which  is  in  degrees  of  this 
kind. 

199.  All  perfections  increase  and  ascend  with  degrees, 
and  according  to  them.  Gen. art. 

.  Of  (degrees  of  height)  it  is  said  that  they  ascend 

or  descend,  for  they  are  of  height ;  whereas  of  (degrees 
of  breadth)  it  is  said  that  they  increase  or  decrease,  for 
they  are  of  breadth.  The  latter  degrees  differ  so  much 
from  the  former,  that  they  have  nothing  in  common  ; 


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59 


Degree 


wherefore  they  must  be  perceived  distinctly,  and  by  no 
means  be  confounded. 

200.  The  reason  why  all  perfections  increase  and 
ascend  with  degrees  and  according  to  them,  is  that  all 
predicates  follow  their  subjects  .  .  . 

e.  The  forms  which  are  not  at  the  same  time 

forces,  are  also  perfect  according  to  degrees. 

201.  We  shall  speak  here  ...  of  the  perfections  of 
life,  of  forces,  and  of  forms,  which  ascend  or  descend 
according  to  degrees  of  height,  because  these  degrees 
are  not  known  in  the  world.  .  .  As  these  degrees  stand 
out  conspicuously  in  the  Spiritual  World,  for  the  whole 
of  that  World  from  highest  to  lowest  is  distinctly  dis- 
creted  into  them,  from  that  World  the  Knowledge  of 
these  degrees  can  be  drawn  ;  and  afterwards  conclusions 
may  be  drawn  therefrom  respecting  the  perfections  of 
the  forces  and  the  forms  which  are  in  like  degrees  in  the 
natural  world. 

202.  In  the  Spiritual  World  there  are  three  Heavens 
arranged  according  to  degrees  of  height  .  .  .  The  degrees 
of  their  perfections  are  such,  that  the  Angels  of  the 
lowest  Heaven  cannot  ascend  to  the  first  threshold  of 
the  perfections  of  the  Angels  of  the  middle  Heaven,  nor 
these  to  the  first  threshold  of  the  perfections  of  the 
Angels  of  the  highest  Heaven.  .  .  The  reason  is,  that 
they  are  consociated  according  to  discrete  degrees,  and 
not  according  to  continuous  degrees.  Ex. 

203.  These  perfections  do  not  appear  to  any  man  so 
long  as  he  lives  in  the  world,  because  he  is  then  in  the 
lowest  degree  ;  and  the  higher  degrees  cannot  be  known 
from  the  lowest  degree,  but  they  are  Known  after  death. 
The  man  then  comes  into  that  degree  which  corresponds 
with  his  love  and  wisdom  .  .  .  There  is  then  an  elevation 
of  all  things  of  his  mind,  not  in  a  simple  ratio,  but  in  a 
triplicate  ratio.  In  the  latter  ratio  are  the  degrees  of 
height ;  in  the  former  are  the  degrees  of  breadth.  But 
none  ascend  into  these  degrees  except  those  who  in  the 
world  have  been  in  truths,  and  have  applied  them  to 
life. 

205.  In  successive  order,  the  first  degree  makes  the 
highest,  and  the  third  the  lowest ;  but  in  simultaneous 
order,  the  first  degree  makes  the  inmost,  and  the  third 
the  outermost.  Gen.  art. 

2.  When  the  degrees  of  height  are  in  successive 

order,  they  may  be  compared  to  a  column  divided  into 
three  steps,  by  means  of  which  ascent  and  descent  are 
made.  Des. 

3.  But  simultaneous  order,  which  consists  of  the 

like  degrees,  has  another  appearance  .  .  .  They  lie  as  in 
a  solid  consisting  of  these  three  degrees  ;  in  the  middle 
of  which  are  the  most  subtle  parts,  round  about  are  the 
parts  less  subtle,  and  in  the  outermost  things,  which 
constitute  the  circuit,  are  the  parts  compounded  of  these, 
and  thence  grosser.  It  is  like  that  column  .  .  .  subsid- 
ing into  a  plane  .  .  . 

207.  In  every  ultimate  there  are  discrete  degrees 
in  simultaneous  order.  The  motor  fibres  in  every 
muscle,  the  fibres  in  every  nerve,  and  the  fibres  and 
little  vessels  in  every  viscus  and  organ,  are  in  such  an 
order.  Inmostly  in  them  are  the  most  simple  things, 
which  are  the  most  perfect ;  the  outermost  is  the  com- 
posite of  these.     There  is  a  like  order  of  these  degrees 


in  every  seed  and  in  every  fruit,  and  also  in  every  metal 
and  stone  .  .  .  The  inmost,  middle,  and  outermost  things 
of  the  parts  are  in  these  degrees,  for  they  are  successive 
compositions  .  .  .  from  simples  .  .  . 

208.  In  short,  there  are  such  degrees  in  every  ultimate, 
thus  in  every  effect.  Ex. 

e.  There  are  the  like  degrees  in  each  and   all 

things  of  the  Word. 

209.  The  ultimate  degree  is  the  complex,  the  contain - 
ant,  and  the  basis  of  the  prior  degrees.   Gen. art. 

.  The  doctrine  of  degrees  .  .  .  has  an  extension, 

not  only  to  natural  things,  but  also  to  civil,  moral,  and 
spiritual  things,  and  to  each  and  all  things  thereof.  Ex. 

211.  All  things  civil,  moral,  and  spiritual  advance 
through  degrees  in  like  manner  as  do  natural  things, 
not  only  through  continuous  degrees,  but  also  through 
discrete  degrees  ;  and  the  progressions  of  discrete  degrees 
are  circumstanced  as  are  the  progressions  of  ends  to 
causes,  and  of  causes  to  effects  .  .  . 

212.  That  the  ultimate  degree  is  the  complex,  the 
containant,  and  the  basis  of  the  prior  degrees,  is  mani- 
festly evident  from  the  progression  of  ends  and  causes  to 
effects.  Ex. 

214.  In  a  series  of  like  degrees  (to  love,  wisdom,  and 
use)  are  affection,  thought,  and  action.  .  .  In  a  series  of 
like  degrees  are  charity,  faith,  and  good  work  ...  In  a 
series  of  like  degrees  are  also  will,  understanding,  and 
exercise  .  .  . 

217.  The  degrees  of  height  in  their  ultimate  are  in 
fulness  and  in  power.  Gen.  art. 

218.  Those  ascending  and  descending  degrees,  which 
are  also  called  prior  and  posterior  ones,  also  degrees  of 
height,  and  discrete  ones,  are  in  their  power  in  their 
ultimate.   Ex. 

.  As  motion  is  the  ultimate  degree  of  endeavour, 

it  thereby  exerts  its  power.  Endeavour,  force,  and 
motion  are  no  otherwise  conjoined  than  according  to 
degrees  of  height,  the  conjunction  of  which  is  not  by 
continuity,  for  they  are  discrete,  but  by  correspondences. 
Ex. 

219.  The  interior  things  which  belong  to  the  will  and 
understanding  make  the  first  degree  ;  the  interior  things 
which  belong  to  the  body  the  second ;  and  the  whole 
body,  which  is  their  complex,  makes  the  third  degree. 

220.  Such  is  the  evolution  and  the  putting  forth  01 
the  degrees  into  power  .  .  . 

221.  There  are  three  senses  in  the  Word  according  to 
the  three  degrees  ...  As  these  senses  are  in  the  Word 
according  to  the  degrees  of  height .  .  . 

222.  There'  are  degrees  of  both  kinds  in  the  greatest 
and  the  least  of  all  things  that  are  created.  Gen.  art.  .  . 
The  greatest  and  the  least  of  all  things  consist  of  discrete 
and  of  continuous  degrees,  or  of  those  of  height  and  of 
breadth  .  .  .     3ioe. 

223.  (The  Angels  say  that)  there  is  nothing  so  small 
which  has  not  in  it  degrees  of  both  kinds  ;  for  instance, 
there  is  not  the  least  thing  in  any  animal .  .  .  plant .  .  . 
or  mineral ...  in  the  ether  and  in  the  air,  that  has  not 
in  it  these  degrees ;  and  as  the  ether  and  the  air  are 
receptacles  of  heat  and  light,  there  is  not  the  least  of 


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60 


Degree 


heat  and  light ;  and  as  spiritual  heat  and  spiritual  light 
are  receptacles  of  love  and  wisdom,  there  is  not  the  least 
of  these,  in  which  there  are  not  degrees  of  both  kinds. 
(The  Angels  also  say)  that  the  least  of  affection,  and  the 
least  of  thought,  nay,  the  least  of  an  idea  of  thought, 
consists  of  degrees  of  both  kinds  ;  and  that  a  least 
which  does  not  consist  of  these  degrees  is  nothing  ;  for 
it  has  no  form,  thus  no  quality,  and  no  state  which  can 
be  changed  and  varied  .  .  .  The  Angels  confirm  this  by 
the  truth,  that  the  infinite  things  in  God  the  Creator 
.  .  .  are  distinctly  one  ;  and  that  there  are  infinite  things 
in  His  infinite  things  ;  and  that  in  the  infinitely  infinite 
things  there  are  degrees  of  both  kinds,  which  also  in 
Him  are  distinctly  one  ;  and  as  these  things  are  in  Him, 
and  all  things  have  been  created  by  Him  ...  it  follows 
that  there  is  not  the  least  finite  thing  in  which  there 
are  not  such  degrees.  The  reason  these  degrees  are 
equally  in  the  least  things  and  in  the  greatest,  is  that 
the  Divine  in  the  greatest  and  in  the  least  things  is  the 
same.     224,  Ex. 

[W.]  225.  The  greatest  things  in  which  there  are  degrees 
of  both  kinds,  are  the  universe  .  .  .  the  natural  world 
.  .  .  the  Spiritual  World  .  .  .  each  empire  .  .  .  each  king- 
dom, in  their  complex  ;  also,  all  the  Civil,  the  Moral, 
and  the  Spiritual  thereof,  in  their  complex  ;  the  whole 
animal  kingdom,  the  whole  vegetable  kingdom,  and  the 
whole  mineral  kingdom,  each  in  its  complex  ;  and  all 
the  atmospheres  of  each  world  taken  together,  and  also 
their  heats  and  lights.  In  like  manner  things  less 
general,  as  man  in  his  complex  ;  every  animal  in  its 
complex  ;  every  tree  and  every  shrub  in  its  complex  ; 
also  every  metal  and  every  stone  in  theirs.  The  forms 
of  these  things  are  similar  in  this  respect,  that  they 
consist  of  degrees  of  both  kinds.  .  .  The  singulars  and 
the  most  singular  things  of  all  these  are  like  the  general 
and  the  most  general  things  in  this,  that  they  are  forms 
of  both  kinds  of  degrees. 

226.  On  account  of  the  greatest  and  the  least  things 
being  forms  of  both  kinds  of  degrees,  there  is  a  connec- 
tion of  them  from  primes  to  ultimates  .  .  .  The  reason 
why  there  is  not  any  least  thing  in  any  form,  or  among 
any  forms,  which  is  the  same  (as  any  other),  is  that 
there  are  the  like  degrees  in  the  greatest  things,  and 
the  greatest  things  consist  of  the  least.  As  there  are 
such  degrees  in  the  greatest  things,  and  according  to 
those  degrees  perpetual  differences  from  top  to  bottom, 
and  from  the  centre  to  the  circumferences,  it  follows 
that  there  do  not  exist  any  less  or  least  things  thereof, 
in  which  there  are  the  like  degrees,  that  are  the  same. 

230.  There  are  three  infinite  and  uncreated  degrees 
in  the  Lord,  and  there  are  three  finite  and  created  degrees 
in  man.  Gen.  art.  .  .  The  reason  there  are  three  infinite 
and  uncreated  degrees  of  height  in  the  Lord,  is  that  the 
Lord  is  love  itself  and  wisdom  itself .  .  .  and  therefore 
is  use  itself  .  .  .  These  three  constitute  the  three  degrees 
of  height  in  the  subjects  of  life.  These  three  are  as  the 
first  end,  the  mediate  end  which  is  called  the  cause,  and 
the  ultimate  end  which  is  called  the  effect.  That  the 
end,  the  cause,  and  the  effect  constitute  three  degrees 
of  height,  has  been  shown  above. 

231.  That  there  are  these  three  degrees  in  man,  may 
be  evident  from  the  elevation  of  his  mind  even  to  the 


degrees  of  love  and  wisdom  in  which  are  the  Angels  of 
the  Second  and  the  Third  Heavens ;  for  ...  as  to  the 
interior  things  of  his  mind,  man  is  Heaven  in  the  least 
form  ;  therefore  there  are  from  creation  as  many  degrees 
of  height  with  man  as  there  are  Heavens.  Man,  too,  is 
an  image  and  likeness  of  God ;  wherefore  these  three 
degrees  are  inscribed  on  man,  because  they  are  in  .  .  . 
the  Lord. 

232.  With  the  Angels,  these  three  degrees  are  named 
celestial,  spiritual,  and  natural ;  and  with  them  the 
celestial  degree  is  the  degree  of  love,  the  spiritual 
degree  is  the  degree  of  wisdom,  and  the  natural  degree 
is  the  degree  of  uses.  The  reason  why  these  degrees 
are  so  named,  is  that  the  Heavens  are  distinguished  into 
two  Kingdoms,  named  the  Celestial  and  the  Spiritual 
Kingdoms,  to  which  is  added  a  third  Kingdom,  in 
which  are  men  in  the  world,  and  which  is  the  Natural 
Kingdom  .  .  . 

233.  In  the  Lord  from  eternity,  before  the  assumption 
of  the  Human  in  the  world,  there  were  the  two  prior 
degrees  actually,  and  the  third  degree  in  potency,  such 
as  thej  also  are  with  the  Angels  ;  but  after  the  assump- 
tion of  the  Human  in  the  World,  He  superinduced  also 
the  third  degree,  which  is  called  natural ;  and  He  there- 
by became  a  Man  like  a  man  in  the  world,  with  this 
difference  however,  that  this  degree,  like  the  prior  ones, 
is  in  Him  infinite  and  uncreate,  while  in  Angel  and  man 
these  degrees  are  finite  and  created.  .  .  Before  ithe 
assumption  of  the  Human,  the  Divine  influx  into  the 
natural  degree  was  mediate  through  the  angelic  Heavens, 
but  after  the  assumption,  immediate  from  Himself. 
234,Ex. 

235.  These  are  the  general  statements  concerning  the 
threefold  ascent  of  the  degrees  of  height.  .  .  There  are 
such  degrees  in  each  and  all  things  of  love,  and  thence 
such  degrees  in  each  and  all  things  of  wisdom,  and, 
from  these,  there  are  such  degrees  in  each  and  all  things 
of  uses  ;  but  in  the  Lord  all  these  degrees  are  infinite, 
and  in  Angel  and  man  finite. 

236.  These  three  degrees  of  height  are  in  every  man 
from  birth,  and  they  can  be  successively  opened  ;  and, 
as  they  are  opened,  the  man  is  in  the  Lord,  and  the 
Lord  in  him.  Gen. art. 

.  So  long  as  these  degrees  remained  hidden,  no 

degrees  could  be  known  but  continuous  degrees  ;  and 
when  only  these  degrees  are  known,  it  may  be  believed 
that  love  and  wisdom  with  man  increase  only  by  con- 
tinuity. But  it  is  to  be  known,  that  with  every  man 
from  birth  there  are  three  degrees  of  height,  or  discrete 
ones,  one  above  or  within  another  ;  and  that  each  degTee 
of  height  .  .  .  has  also  degrees  of  breadth  .  .  .  according 
to  which  it  increases  by  continuity  ;  for  there  are  degrees 
of  both  kinds  in  the  greatest  and  in  the  least  of  all 
things  ...  as  no  degree  of  one  kind  can  possibly  exist 
without  degrees  of  the  other  kind. 

237.  These  three  degrees  of  height  are  named  natural, 
spiritual,  and  celestial.  .  .  When  man  is  born  he  first 
comes  into  the  natural  degree,  and  this  increases  with 
him  by  continuity,  according  to  knowledges  and  accord- 
ing to  the  understanding  thereby  acquired,  up  to  the 
highest  of  the  understanding  which  is  called  the  Rational ; 
but  still  he  does  not  thereby  open  the  second  degree 


Degree 


61 


Degree 


•which  is  called  the  spiritual  one  ;  this  is  opened  by  the 
love  of  uses  from  intellectual  things,  that  is  to  say,  by 
the  spiritual  love  of  uses,  which  love  is  love  towards  the 
neighbour.  This  degree  is  in  like  manner  able  to 
increase  by  a  continuous  degree  up  to  its  summit,  and 
it  increases  by  means  of  the  Knowledges  of  truth  and 
good,  that  is,  by  means  of  spiritual  truths.  Yet  the 
third  degree,  which  is  called  the  celestial  one,  is  not 
opened  even  by  these  truths,  but  it  is  opened  by  means 
of  the  celestial  love  of  use,  which  love  is  love  to  the 
Lord,  and  love  to  the  Lord  is  nothing  else  than  commit- 
ting to  life  the  precepts  of  the  Word  .  .  .  These  three 
degrees  are  thus  successively  opened  with  man. 

238.  So  long  as  a  man  lives  in  the  world,  he  does  not 
know  anything  about  the  opening  of  these  degrees  in 
himself.  The  reason  is,  that  he  is  then  in  the  natural 
degree,  which  is  the  ultimate,  and  from  it  he  at  that 
time  thinks,  wills,  speaks,  and  acts  ;  and  the  spiritual 
degree,  which  is  the  interior  one,  does  not  communicate 
with  the  natural  degree  by  continuity,  but  by  corre- 
spondences, and  communication  by  correspondences  is 
not  felt.  When,  however,  a  man  puts  off  the  natural 
degree,  which  is  the  case  when  he  dies,  he  then  comes 
into  that  degree  which  has  been  opened  with  him  in 
the  world  ;  into  the  spiritual  one  he  with  whom  the 
spiritual  degree  has  been  opened,  into  the  celestial  one 
he  with  whom  the  celestial  degree  has  been  opened. 
He  who  comes  into  the  spiritual  degree  after  death,  no 
longer  thinks,  wills,  speaks,  and  acts  naturally,  but 
spiritually  ;  and  he  who  comes  into  the  celestial  degree, 
thinks,  wills,  speaks,  and  acts  according  to  his  own 
degree.  And  as  communication  between  the  three 
degrees  exists  only  by  correspondences,  the  differences 
of  love,  of  wisdom,  and  of  use  as  to  these  degrees  are 
such,  that  they  have  nothing  in  common  by  any  con- 
tinuity between  themselves. 

239.  As  there  exist  with  man  three  degrees  of  love 
and  wisdom  and  thence  of  use,  it  follows  that  there  also 
exist  with  him  three  degrees  of  will  and  understanding 
and  thence  of  conclusion,  and  thus  of  determination  to 
use  ...  In  a  word,  the  mind  of  man  ...  is  of  three 
degrees,  so  that  man  has  a  natural  mind,  a  spiritual 
mind,  and  a  celestial  mind  .  .  . 

3.  See  CoMMATfv-praecipere,  at  this  ref. 

240e.  The  Lord's  abode  with  man  is  nearer,  as  by 
means  of  these  faculties  a  man  opens  the  higher  degrees  ; 
for  by  the  opening  of  these  he  comes  into  the  higher 
degrees  of  love  and  wisdom,  thus  nearer  to  the  Lord. 
Hence  it  is  evident,  that  as  these  degrees  are  opened, 
so  is  the  man  in  the  Lord,  and  the  Lord  in  him. 

241.  The  three  degrees  of  height  are  as  the  end,  the 
cause,  and  the  effect,  and  according  to  these  degrees 
there  succeed  love,  wisdom,  and  use. 

242.  Spiritual  light  inflows  with  man  through  three 
degrees,  but  not  spiritual  heat,  except  iu  so  far  as  man 
shuns  evils  as  sins,  and  looks  to  the  Lord.  Gen.  art. 

.  There   are   three   degrees   of   light   and  three 

degrees  of  heat,  that  is,  three  degrees  of  wisdom  and 
three  degrees  of  love,  and  these  degrees  have  been 
formed  with  man  in  order  that  he  may  be  a  receptacle 
of  the  Divine  love  and  the  Divine  wisdom,  thus  of  the 
Lord. 


e.  Man  is  able  to  receive  wisdom  up  to  the  third 

degree,  but  not  love,  unless  he  shuns  evils  as  sins,  and 
looks  to  the  Lord  .  .  . 

245.  The  nature  of  the  influx  of  light  into  the  three 
degrees  of  life  which  are  of  the  mind  with  man,  shall 
now  be  told.  The  forms  which  are  the  receptacles  of 
heat  and  light,  or  of  love  and  wisdom,  with  him,  and 
which  are  in  a  threefold  order,  or  are  of  three  degrees, 
are  from  birth  transparent,  and  transmit  spiritual  light 
as  crystalline  glass  transmits  natural  light.  Hence  it  is 
that  as  to  wisdom  man  can  be  raised  up  to  the  third 
degree.  Yet  these  forms  are  not  opened  until  spiritual 
heat  conjoins  itself  with  spiritual  light ...  By  this 
conjunction  these  transparent  forms  are  opened  accord- 
ing to  the  degrees. 

246.  When  a  man  shuns  evils  from  the  Lord,  the  love 
of  evil  and  its  heat  is  removed,  and  the  love  of  good  and 
its  heat  is  introduced  in  its  place,  by  which  a  higher 
degree  is  opened.  For  the  Lord  flows  in  from  above, 
and  opens  it  .  .  . 

247.  By  the  influx  of  spiritual  light  into  all  the  three 
degrees  of  the  mind,  man  is  distinguished  from  beasts, 
and  ...  is  able  to  think  analytically  .  .  . 

248.  If  the  higher  degree,  which  is  the  spiritual  one, 
is  not  opened  with  man,  he  becomes  natural  and  sen- 
suous. Gen.  art.  It  was  shown  that  there  are  three 
degrees  of  the  human  mind,  which  are  called  natural, 
spiritual,  and  celestial ;  and  that  these  degrees  can  be 
successively  opened  with  him  :  also,  that  the  natural 
degree  is  first  opened,  and  afterwards,  if  he  shuns  evils 
as  sins,  and  looks  to  the  Lord,  the  spiritual  degree  is 
opened,  and  at  last  the  celestial  degree.  As  these 
degrees  are  successively  opened  according  to  the  man's 
life,  it  follows  that  the  two  higher  degrees  may  also  not 
be  opened,  and  that  the  man  then  remains  in  the  natural 
degree,  which  is  the  ultimate  one.     2602. 

e.  It  is  not  known  that  the  natural  man  becomes 

spiritual  by  the  opening   of  any  higher  degree  with 
him  .  .  . 

252.  The  quality  of  the  natural  man  with  whom  the 
spiritual  degree  is  opened.  Gen.  art.  The  natural  man 
is  a  full  man  when  the  spiritual  degree  is  opened  with 
him  .  .  .  The  natural  man  with  whom  the  spiritual 
degree  is  opened  does  not  know  that  he  thinks  and  acts 
from  his  spiritual  man  .  .  .  Neither  does  the  natural  man 
whose  spiritual  degree  is  opened  know  that  by  his 
spiritual  man  he  is  in  Heaven  .  .  .  Moreover,  the  natural 
man  with  whom  the  spiritual  degree  is  opened  does  not 
know  that  his  spiritual  mind  is  filled  by  the  Lord  with 
thousands  of  the  arcana  of  wisdom  and  with  thousands 
of  the  delights  of  love  .  .  .  The  reason  why  the  natural 
man  does  not  know  these  things,  is  that  communication 
between  the  natural  man  and  the  spiritual  man  is 
effected  by  correspondences  .  .  . 

253.  The  quality  of  the  natural  man  with  whom  the 
spiritual  degree  is  not  opened,  but  still  is  not  closed  up. 
Gen.  art.  The  spiritual  degree  is  not  opened,  but  still 
is  not  closed  up,  with  those  who  have  led  some  life  of 
charity,  and  yet  have  known  but  little  genuine  truth. 
The  reason  is,  that  this  degree  is  opened  by  the  con- 
junction of  love  and  wisdom,  or  of  heat  with  light .  .  . 


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62 


Degree 


Love  (alone,  therefore,)  does  not  avail  to  open  that 
degree,  but  only  keeps  it  in  the  potency  of  being 
opened  ;  which  is  meant  by  its  not  being  closed  up  .  .  . 

[W.253]2.  Good  through  truths  opens  the  spiritual 
degree  .  .  . 

.  The  lot  after  death  of  those  with  whom  the 

spiritual  degree  is  not  opened,  and  still  not  closed  up, 
is  that  as  they  are  still  natural  and  not  spiritual,  they 
are  in  the  lowest  parts  of  Heaven  ...  or  they  are  in  the 
boundaries  in  some  higher  Heaven,  where  they  are  as  it 
were  in  the  light  of  evening  .  .  . 

254.  The  quality  of  the  natural  man  with  whom  the 
spiritual  degree  is  entirely  closed  up.  Gen.  art.  The 
spiritual  degree  is  closed  up  with  those  who  are  in  evils 
as  to  life,  and  still  more  with  those  who  from  evils  are 
in  falsities  ...  So  the  substances  or  forms  of  the  spiritual 
degree  with  man  shrink  from  evils  and  their  falsities, 
because  these  are  heterogeneous  ;  for,  as  the  spiritual 
degree  is  in  the  form  of  Heaven,  it  admits  nothing  but 
goods  and  the  truths  which  are  from  good ;  these  are 
homogeneous  to  it .  .  . 

2.  This  degree  is  contracted,  and  by  contraction 

closed  up,  with  those  especially  who  in  the  world  are  in 
the  love  of  ruling  from  self-love,  because  this  love  is 
opposed  to  love  to  the  Lord.  It  is  also  closed  up  with 
those  who  from  the  love  of  the  world  are  in  the  mad 
cupidity  of  possessing  the  goods  of  others,  but  not  to 
such  a  degree.  The  reason  why  these  loves  close  the 
spiritual  degree,  is  that  they  are  the  origins  of  evils. 
The  contraction  or  closing  up  of  this  degree  is  like  the 
retorsion  of  a  spire  into  the  opposite  direction  ;  which  is 
the  reason  why,  after  this  degree  has  been  closed  up,  it 
reflects  the  light  of  Heaven  .  .  . 

3.  "With  these  persons,  not  only  is  the  spiritual 

degree  itself  closed  up,  but  also  the  higher  region  of 
the  natural  degree,  which  is  called  the  Rational ;  until 
at  last  the  lowest  region  of  the  natural  degree,  which  is 
called  the  Sensuous,  alone  stands  open  .  .  . 

255.  The  difference  (between  the  life  of  a  merely 
natural  man  and  that  of  a  beast)  is  that  man  has  three 
degrees  of  the  mind,  that  is,  three  degrees  of  the  under- 
standing and  of  the  will,  and  these  degrees  can  be 
successively  opened  ;  and,  as  they  are  transparent,  man 
can  be  raised  as  to  his  understanding  into  the  light  of 
Heaven  .  .  .  But  beasts  have  not  the  two  higher  degrees, 
but  only  the  natural  degrees,  which,  without  the  higher 
degrees,  are  in  no  faculty  of  thinking  about  any  subject ; 
civil,  moral,  or  spiritual.  And  as  their  natural  degrees 
are  not  capable  of  being  opened,  and  thence  of  being 
raised  into  higher  light,  they  cannot  think  in  successive 
order,  but  in  simultaneous  order,  which  is  not  thinking 
.  .  .     P.  324. 

256.  Regarded  in  itself,  the  natural  degree  of  the 
human  mind  is  continuous,  but  by  correspondence  with 
the  two  higher  degrees,  while  it  is  elevated,  it  appears 
as  if  it  were  discrete.  Gen.  art. 

.  But  the  enlightenment   of  the   natural   mind 

does  not  ascend  by  discrete  degrees,  but  it  increases  by 
a  continuous  degree,  and,  as  it  increases,  so  that  mind 
is  enlightened  from  within  by  the  light  of  the  two 
higher  degrees.  How  this  takes  place,  can  be  compre- 
hended from  a  perception  of  the  degrees  of  height,  in 


that  one  degree  is  above  another,  and  that  the  natural 
degree,  which  is  the  ultimate  one,  is  a  kind  of  general 
covering  to  the  two  higher  degrees  ;  and  then,  as  the 
natural  degree  is  elevated  to  a  degree  of  higher  [light], 
so  the  higher  from  within  acts  into  the  exterior  Natural, 
and  illuminates  it.  The  illumination  is  indeed  effected 
from  within  by  the  light  of  the  higher  degrees,  but  this 
light  is  received  by  the  natural  degree  which  envelops 
and  surrounds  them,  by  continuity,  therefore  more 
lucidly  and  purely  according  to  the  height  of  the  ascent ; 
that  is  to  say,  the  natural  degree  is  enlightened  from 
within  from  the  light  of  the  higher  degrees,  discretely, 
but  in  itself  continuously.  Hence  it  is  evident  that  so 
long  as  man  lives  in  the  world,  and  is  thereby  in  the 
natural  degree,  he  cannot  be  elevated  into  wisdom  itself 
such  as  exists  with  the  Angels,  but  only  into  higher 
light  up  to  the  Angels,  and  into  receiving  enlighten- 
ment from  their  light  .  .  . 

25  74.  But  still  the  man  with  whom  the  spiritual 
degree  has  been  opened,  comes  into  that  wisdom  when 
he  dies,  and  he  can  also  come  into  it  by  a  laying  asleep 
of  the  sensations  of  the  body  .  .  . 

258.  Every  man  is  born  into  the  faculty  of  understand- 
ing truths  even  to  that  inmost  degree  in  which  are  the 
Angels  of  the  Third  Heaven  ;  for  the  human  understand- 
ing, rising  up  by  continuity  around  the  two  higher 
degrees,  receives  the  light  of  the  wisdom  of  those  degrees 
.  .  .  Hence  it  is,  that  man  can  become  rational  according 
to  this  elevation  ;  if  he  is  elevated  to  the  third  degree, 
he  becomes  rational  from  the  third  degree  ;  if  he  is 
elevated  to  the  second  degree,  he  becomes  rational  from 
the  second  degree  ;  and  if  he  is  not  elevated,  he  is 
rational  in  the  first  degree.  It  is  said  that  he  becomes 
rational  from  these  degrees,  because  the  natural  degree 
is  the  general  receptacle  of  their  light. 

2.  Hence  it  is,  that  if  a  man's  love  is  not  elevated 

at  the  same  time  into  the  spiritual  degree,  he  is  still  not 
rational  save  in  the  ultimate  degree.  Hence  it  is 
evident,  that  man's  Rational  is  in  appearance  as  of  three 
degrees  .  .  . 

260.  As  the  natural  mind  is  the  covering  and  contain- 
ant  of  the  higher  degrees  of  the  human  mind,  it  is 
reactive  ;  and  if  the  higher  degrees  are  not  opened,  it 
acts  against  them,  but  if  they  are  opened,  it  acts  with 
them.  Gen.  art. 

.  As  the  natural  mind  is  in  the  ultimate  degree, 

it  envelops  and  encloses  the  spiritual  mind  and  the 
celestial  mind,  which,  as  to  degrees,  are  higher  than  it. 

2.  (In   respect  to  the    reaction   of   the    natural 

mind)  it  is  the  same  with  every  ultimate  degree  of 
degrees  of  height  .  .  . 

269e.  The  malignity  of  evil  increases  according  to  the 
degree  of  the  closing  up  of  the  natural  mind  .  .  . 

274.  The  natural  mind,  which  is  a  form  or  image  of 
Hell,  descends  by  three  degrees.  Gen. art.  In  the 
greatest  and  in  the  least  things  there  are  degrees  of  two 
kinds  .  .  .  and  such  also  is  the  case  with  the  natural 
mind  in  its  greatest  and  in  its  least  things  :  degrees  of 
height  are  here  meant.  From  its  two  faculties,  which 
are  called  rationality  and  freedom,  the  natural  mind  is 
in  such  a  state,  that  it  can  ascend  through  three  degrees, 
and  it  can  descend  through  three  degrees  .  .  .  when  it 


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63 


Degree 


ascends,  the  lower  degrees  which  tend  to  Hell  are 
closed,  and  when  it  descends,  the  higher  degrees  which 
tend  to  Heaven  are  closed  :  the  reason  is,  that  they  are 
in  reaction.  These  three  degrees,  higher  and  lower,  are 
neither  opened  nor  closed  in  man  in  early  infancy  ;  for 
he  is  then  in  ignorance  of  good  and  truth,  and  of  evil 
and  falsity  ;  but  as  he  commits  himself  to  the  one  or  the 
other,  so  are  the  degrees  opened  or  closed  on  the  one 
side  or  on  the  other.  "When  they  are  opened  towards 
Hell,  the  reigning  love  .  .  .  obtains  the  highest  place, 
the  thought  of  falsity  from  that  love  .  .  .  obtains  the 
second  place,  and  the  conclusion  of  the  love  through  the 
thought  .  .  .  obtains  the  lowest  place.  It  is  the  same 
here  as  with  the  degrees  of  height  before  treated  of, 
namely,  that  they  are  in  order  as  the  end,  the  cause,  and 
the  effect .  .  .  The  descent  of  these  degrees  is  towards 
the  body ;  hence,  in  the  descent  they  become  grosser, 
and  become  material  and  corporeal.  If  truths  from  the 
Word  in  the  second  degree  are  taken  to  it  to  form  it, 
these  truths  are  falsified  from  the  first  degree,  which  is 
the  love  of  evil  .  .  . 

275.  The  three  degrees  of  the  natural  mind,  which  is 
a  form  and  image  of  Hell,  are  opposite  to  the  three 
degrees  of  the  spiritual  mind,  which  is  a  form  and 
image  of  Heaven.  Gen. art.  There  are  three  degrees  of 
the  mind,  which  are  called  natural,  spiritual,  and 
celestial ;  and  the  human  mind  consisting  of  these 
degrees  looks  toward  Heaven,  and  bends  itself  round 
thither  .  .  .  Hence  it  may  be  seen,  that  when  the 
natural  mind  looks  downwards,  and  bends  itself  round 
towards  Hell,  it  consists  in  like  manner  of  three  degrees, 
and  that  each  degree  of  it  is  opposite  to  a  degree  of  the 
mind  which  is  a  Heaven.  .  .  (For)  there  are  three 
Heavens,  and  these  are  distinct  according  to  degrees  of 
height ;  and  there  are  three  Hells,  and  these  also  are 
distinct  according  to  degrees  of  height,  that  is,  of  depth 
...  It  is  the  same  with  the  natural  mind,  which  is  in 
the  form  of  Hell .  .  . 

3.  Love  to  the  Lord,  and  thence  love  towards  the 

neighbour,  make  the  inmost  degree  in  the  Heavens  ; 
but  the  love  of  self  and  the  love  of  the  world  make  the 
inmost  degree  in  the  Hells  :  wisdom  and  intelligence 
from  their  own  loves  make  the  middle  degree  in  the 
Heavens  ;  but  folly  and  insanity  .  .  .  from  their  own 
loves  make  the  middle  degree  in  the  Hells  :  and  the 
conclusions  from  their  own  two  degrees,  which  are 
either  stored  up  in  the  memory  as  knowledges,  or  are 
determined  into  acts  in  the  body,  make  the  ultimate 
degree  in  the  Heavens  ;  and  the  conclusions  from  their 
own  two  degrees,  which  either  become  knowledges,  or 
become  acts,  make  the  outermost  degree  in  the  Hells. 
(Shown  from  experience. ) 

277.  All  things  which  are  of  the  three  degrees  of  the 
natural  mind,  are  included  in  the  works  which  are  done 
by  acts  of  the  body.   Gen.  art. 

.  There  are  forces  of  the  motor  fibres  of  the  whole 

body  in  concurrence,  and  there  are  all  the  things  of  the 
mind  which  excite  and  determine  these  forces,  which 
are  of  three  degrees  .  .  .  And  as  there  are  all  things  of 
the  mind,  there  are  all  things  of  the  will  .  .  .  which 
make  the  first  degree  ;  there  are  all  things  of  the  under- 
standing .  .  .  which  make  the  second  degree  ;  and  there 


are  all  things  of  the  memory  .  .  .  which   present  the 
third  degree. 

278.  Each  degree  is  encompassed  by  a  covering,  and 
is  thereby  distinguished  from  another  degree  ;  where- 
fore those  things  which  belong  to  the  first  degree  are 
not  known  by  the  second  degree  ;  nor  are  the  things 
which  belong  to  this  degree  known  by  the  third.  For 
example  :  The  love  of  the  will,  which  is  the  first  degree 
of  the  mind,  is  not  known  in  the  wisdom  of  the  under- 
standing, which  is  the  second  degree  of  the  mind, 
except  by  a  certain  delight  in  the  thought  of  a  thing. 
The  first  degree,  which,  as  was  said,  is  the  love  of  the 
will,  is  not  known  in  the  knowledge  of  the  memory, 
except  by  a  certain  pleasantness  in  knowing  and  speaking. 

295e.  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  the  Natural  and  the 
Spiritual  differ  according  to  degrees  of  height  .  .  . 

297.  Love,  wisdom,  and  use  follow  in  order  according 
to  degrees  of  height,  and  the  ultimate  degree  is  the 
complex,  the  containant,  and  the  basis  of  the  prior 
degrees. 

300.  The  one  only  substance,  which  is  the  Sun, 
proceeding  by  means  of  atmospheres  according  to  con- 
tinuous degrees,  or  those  of  breadth,  and  at  the  same 
time  according  to  discrete  degrees,  or  those  of  height, 
presents  the  varieties  of  all  things  in  the  created 
universe. 

302.  There  are  three  atmospheres  in  each  world  .  .  . 
which  are  distinct  from  each  other  according  to  degrees 
of  height,  and  which  decrease  in  their  downward  pro- 
gression according  to  degrees  of  breadth.  .  .  From  this 
origin  of  substances  and  matters,  it  follows,  that  these 
substances  and  matters  are  also  of  three  degrees. 

313.  The  first  forms  of  the  mineral  kingdom  are  the 
substances  and  matters  of  which  earths  consist,  in  their 
least  things  ;  the  second  forms  are  congregates  of  these 
.  .  .  the  third  forms  arise  from  plants  fallen  to  dust,  and 
from  the  remains  of  animals,  and  from  the  continual 
evaporations  and  exhalations  of  these,  which  mix  with 
earths,  and  form  their  soil.  These  forms  of  the  three 
degrees  of  the  mineral  kingdom  .  .  . 

345.  The  Spiritual  flows  down  from  its  Sun  through 
three  degrees  down  to  the  ultimates  of  nature,  and 
these  degrees  are  called  celestial,  spiritual,  and  natural ; 
and  these  degrees  are  in  man  from  creation,  and  thence 
from  birth  ;  and  they  are  opened  according  to  his  life. 
If  the  celestial  degree  is  opened,  which  is  the  highest 
and  inmost  one,  the  man  becomes  celestial ;  if  the 
spiritual  degree  is  opened,  which  is  the  middle  one,  he 
becomes  spiritual ;  and  if  only  the  natural  degree  is 
opened,  which  is  the  lowest  and  outermost  one,  the  man 
becomes  natural. 

3462.  All  animals,  great  and  small,  draw  their  origin 
from  the  Spiritual  in  the  ultimate  degree,  which  is 
called  the  natural  one  ;  man  alone  from  all  the  degrees, 
which  are  three,  and  are  called  celestial,  spiritual,  and 
natural.  As  every  degree  of  height  .  .  .  decreases  by 
continuity  from  its  perfection  to  its  imperfection  ...  so 
do  animals  .  .  .  But  still,  as  they  live  only  from  the 
ultimate  spiritual  degree,  which  is  called  natural,  they 
cannot  look  elsewhere  than  to  the  earth  .  .  . 

414.  See  Love  at  this  ref. 


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64 


Degree 


[W.  ]  422s.  The  reason  love  purified  by  wisdom  becomes 
spiritual  and  celestial,  is  that  man  has  three  degrees  of 
life,  which  are  called  natural,  spiritual,  and  celestial .  . . 
and  man  can  be  elevated  from  one  degree  to  another. 

4242.  Just  as  natural  love  can  ascend  through  degrees, 
and  become  spiritual  and  celestial,  so  also  it  can  descend 
through  degrees,  and  become  sensuous  and  corporeal .  .  . 

4322.  There  was  seen  as  it  were  a  least  image  of  a 
brain  .  .  .  which  in  the  upper  gibbous  part  was  a 
compages  of  contiguous  globules  or  spherules,  and  each 
spherule  was  compacted  of  others  still  more  minute,  and 
each  of  these  in  like  manner  of  others  most  minute  :  thus 
it  was  of  three  degrees. 

4.  The  Angels  said,  that  the  two  internal  degrees, 

which  were  in  the  order  and  form  of  Heaven,  were 
receptacles  of  love  and  wisdom  from  the  Lord  ;  and  that 
the  exterior  degree,  which  was  in  opposition,  contrary 
to  the  order  and  form  of  Heaven,  was  the  receptacle  of 
infernal  love  and  insanity  .  .  .  and  from  this  fall  there 
is  no  recovery,  unless  the  higher  degrees  are  opened. 

P.  32.  Man  is  such  from  creation,  that,  through 
degrees,  he  can  be  more  and  more  closely  conjoined 
with  the  Lord.   Ex. 

2.  In  every  man  from  creation  and  thence  birth 

there  are  three  discrete  degrees  .  .  .  and  man  comes  into 
tho  first  degree,  which  is  called  natural,  when  he  is 
born,  and  he  can  augment  this  degree  with  himself  by 
continuity  even  until  he  becomes  rational ;  and  he 
comes  into  the  second  degree,  which  is  called  spiritual, 
if  he  lives  according  to  the  spiritual  laws  of  order,  which 
are  Divine  truths  ;  and  he  can  also  come  into  the  third 
degree,  which  is  called  celestial,  if  he  lives  according  to 
the  celestial  laws  of  order,  which  are  Divine  goods. 
These  degrees  are  opened  with  a  man  by  the  Lord 
according  to  his  life  in  the  world,  actually  ;  but  not 
perceptibly  and  sensibly  until  after  his  departure  out  of 
the  world ;  and  as  they  are  opened  and  afterwards 
perfected,  the  man  is  more  and  more  closely  conjoined 
with  the  Lord. 

3.   But  still  an  Angel  cannot  attain,  or  even  touch, 

the  first  degree  of  the  Lord's  love  and  wisdom  .  .  . 

34.  As  there  are  three  degrees  of  life  with  man  from 
creation  and  thence  from  birth  .  .  .  there  are  especially 
three  degrees  of  wisdom  with  him  ;  these  are  the  degrees 
which  are  opened  with  man  according  to  conjunction ; 
they  are  opened  according  to  love  .  .  .  But  of  the  ascent 
of  love  according  to  degrees,  man  has  only  an  obscure 
perception  ;  the  ascent  of  wisdom,  however,  is  clearly 
perceived  with  those  who  know  and  see  what  wisdom  is. 
The  reason  why  the  degrees  of  wisdom  are  perceived,  is 
that  love  enters  through  affections  into  the  perceptions 
and  thoughts  .  .  . 

2.  But  there  are  three  degrees  of  wisdom,  the 

natural,  the  spiritual,  and  the  celestial.  Man  is  in  the 
natural  degree  of  wisdom  while  he  lives  in  the  world. 
This  degree  may  then  be  perfected  with  him  to  its  highest 
point,  and  still  it  cannot  enter  the  spiritual  degree, 
because  this  degree  is  not  continued  from  the  natural 
degree  by  continuity,  but  is  conjoined  with  it  by 
correspondences.  After  death,  man  is  in  the  spiritual 
degree  of  wisdom  ;  and  this  degree  is  also  such  that  it 
may  be  perfected  to  the  highest  point,  but  still  it  cannot 


enter  the  celestial  degree  of  wisdom,  because  this  degree 
is  not  continued  from  the  spiritual  one  by  continuity,  but 
is  conjoined  with  it  by  correspondences  .  .  . 

e.  The  Lord  alone  opens  the  spiritual  degree  and 

the  celestial  degree,  and  with  those  only  who  are  wise 
from  Him  .  .  . 

36.  They  represent  wisdom  to  themselves  as  a  palace 
.  .  .  the  ascent  to  which  is  by  twelve  steps  .  .  .  The 
twelve  steps  to  the  palace  of  wisdom  signify  goods 
conjoined  with  truths,  and  truths  conjoined  'with  goods. 

37.  Similar  things  to  those  which  have  been  said  about 
the  degrees  of  life  and  of  wisdom  according  to  conjunc- 
tion with  the  Lord,  may  also  be  said  about  the  degrees 
of  happiness  ;  for  happinesses  .  .  .  ascend  as  the  higher 
degrees  of  the  mind  are  opened  with  man,  which  are 
called  the  spiritual  and  the  celestial  ones  ;  and,  after  his 
life  in  the  world ,  these  degrees  increase  to  eternity. 

75.  The  human  mind  is  of  three  degrees  .  .  .  where- 
fore man  can  be  elevated  from  natural  knowledge  into 
spiritual  intelligence,  and  thence  into  celestial  wisdom  .  .  . 

1662.  There  are  three  degrees  of  light  in  the  Spiritual 
"World  ;  celestial  light,  spiritual  light,  and  spiritual 
natural  light  .  .  . 

167.  The  light  in  Hell  also  is  of  three  degrees.  Des. 

32410.  The  reason  the  like  does  not  take  place  with 
many  in  the  world,  is  that  they  love  the  first  degree  of 
their  life,  which  is  called  natural  .  .  .  and,  regarded  in 
itself,  the  natural  degree  of  life  loves  nothing  but  self 
and  the  world,  for  it  coheres  with  the  sense  of  the  body 
.  .  .  ;  whereas  the  spiritual  degree  of  life  regarded  in 
itself  loves  the  Lord  and  Heaven,  and  also  self  and  the 
world,  but  God  and  Heaven  as  higher  .  .  . 

334.  Every  Angel  is  perfected  in  wisdom  to  eternity  ; 
but  each  according  to  the  degree  of  the  affection  of  good 
and  truth  in  which  he  was  when  he  left  the  world  :  it  is 
this  degree  which  is  perfected  to  eternity  ;  what  is  out- 
side this  degree  is  outside  the  Angel  .  .  .  Sig. 

R.  492.  As  there  are  (the  Divine  Celestial,  the  Divine 
Spiritual,  and  the  Divine  Natural)  in  the  Lord,  there 
are  also  these  three  in  the  angelic  Heaven  .  .  .  Hence, 
too,  in  every  man,  as  he  is  created  to  the  image  of  God, 
there  are  these  three  degrees  ;  and,  as  they  are  opened, 
he  becomes  an  Angel  of  either  the  Third,  the  Second,  or 
the  Ultimate  Heaven  .  .  . 

675e.  Lo,  there  were  steps  before  our  eyes,  by  which 
we  ascended  .  .  . 

7442.  The  reason  there  are  in  the  Church,  external, 
internal,  and  inmost  things,  is  that,  like  Heaven,  the 
Lord's  Church  is  distinguished  into  three  degrees  ;  in  the 
ultimate  degree  are  they  who  are  in  its  external  things, 
in  the  second  degree  are  they  who  are  in  its  internal 
things,  and  in  the  third  degree  are  they  who  are  in  its 
inmost  things.  (These  three  degrees  of  the  Church  are 
signified  respectively  by  'the  called,'  '  the  chosen,' and 
'the  faithful'  (Rev.xvii.  14). 

7742.  There  are  three  degrees  of  wisdom  and  love,  and 
thence  three  degrees  of  truth  and  good  ;  the  first  degree 
is  called  celestial,  the  second  spiritual,  and  the  third 
natural ;  these  degrees  are  with  every  man  from  birth  ; 


Degree 


65 


Degree 


and  they  are  also  in  general  in  Heaven  and  in  the 
Church ;  which  is  the  reason  why  there  are  three 
Heavens  .  .  .  entirely  distinct  from  each  other  according 
to  these  degrees ;  in  like  manner  the  Lord's  Church 
on  earth  .  .  . 

M.  76s.  Steps  of  alabaster.     R.S752. 

1375.  (The  Sun's  altitude  there  is  45  degrees.) 

1853.  The  reason  is,  that  the  internal  things  of  man, 
by  which  are  meant  the  things  of  his  mind  or  spirit,  are 
elevated  in  a  higher  degree  above  the  external  things  ; 
and  in  those  things  which  are  in  a  higher  degree,  a 
thousand  things  take  place  in  the  same  instant  in  which 
one  takes  place  in  external  ones. 

1883.  See  Region  at  this  ref. 

442.  It  is  said  that  the  delights  are  natural,  sensuous, 
and  corporeal,  because  the  Natural  is  distinguished  into 
three  degrees  ;  in  the  highest  degree  are  those  natural 
men  who  from  rational  sight  see  insanities,  and  still  are 
carried  away  -by  the  delights  thereof .  .  .  ;  in  a  lower 
degree  are  the  natural  men  who  see  and  judge  only  from 
the  senses  of  the  body  .  .  .  ;  in  the  lowest  degree  are  the 
natural  men  who  without  judgment  are  carried  away  by 
the  alluring  heats  of  their  bodies  .  .  . 

478.  On  adulteries,  and  their  kinds  and  degrees. 
Gen.  art. 

485.  There  are  four  degrees  of  adulteries  .  .  .  Gen. 
art.  These  degrees  are  not  kinds,  but  enter  into  each 
kind  .  .  . 

4S6.  Adulteries  of  the  first  degree  are  adulteries  of 
ignorance  .  .  .  Gen.  art. 

488.  Adulteries  of  the  second  degree  arc  adulteries  of 
lust .  .  .  Gen.  art. 

490.  Adulteries  of  the  third  degree  are  adulteries  of 
the  reason  .  .  .  Gen.  art. 

492.  Adulteries  of  the  fourth  degree  are  adulteries  of 
the  will  .  .  .  Gen.  art. 

494.  Adulteries  of  the  third  and  fourth  degrees  are 
evils  of  sin  according  to  the  quantity  and  quality  of  the 
understanding  and  will  in  them  .  .  .  Gen.  art. 

496.  There  are  three  degrees  of  the  natural  man  ;  in 
the  first  are  they  who  love  the  world  only  .  .  .  these  are 
properly  meant  by  the  natural  ;  in  the  second  degree 
are  they  who  love  the  delights  of  the  senses  only  .  .  . 
these  are  properly  meant  by  the  sensuous  ;  in  the  third 
degree  are  they  who  love  themselves  only  .  .  .  these  are 
properly  meant  by  the  corporeal.  Ex. 

532s.  There  are  three  degrees  of  life,  and  thence  three 
Heavens  ;  and  the  human  mind  is  distinguished  into 
these  degrees.  The  Angels  said,  Did  not  they  not  know 
this  before  ?  I  replied,  that  they  knew  about  degrees 
between  greater  and  less,  but  nothing  about  degrees 
between  prior  and  posterior. 

I.  16.  There  are  three  degrees  in  the  Spiritual  World, 
and  three  degrees  in  the  natural  world  heretofore  un- 
known, according  to  which  all  influx  takes  place.  Gen. 
art.  By  the  investigation  of  causes  from  effects,  it  is 
discovered  that  there  are  two  kinds  of  degrees  ;  one  in 
which  things  are  prior  and  posterior,  and  another  in 
which  they  are  greater  and  less.  The  degrees  which 
VOL.  11. 


distinguish  things  prior  and  posterior  are  to  be  called 
degrees  of  height,  also  discrete  degrees  ;  but  the  degrees 
by  which  things  greater  and  less  are  distinguished  from 
each  other,  are  to  be  called  degrees  of  breadth,  and  also 
continuous  degrees.  Degrees  of  height  .  .  .  are  like  the 
generations  and  compositions  of  one  thing  from  another  ; 
as  for  example,  of  some  nerve  from  its  fibres,  and  of  any 
fibre  from  its  fibrils  ;  or  of  some  piece  of  wood,  stone,  or 
metal  from  its  parts,  and  of  any  part  from  its  particles. 
But  degrees  of  breadth  .  .  .  are  like  the  increments  and 
decrements  of  the  same  degree  of  height  with  respect  to 
breadth,  length,  height,  and  de]3th  ;  as  of  greater  and 
less  volumes  of  water,  air,  or  ether  ;  and  as  of  large  and 
small  masses  of  wood,  stone,  or  metal.  Each  and  all 
things  in  the  Spiritual  and  natural  worlds,  are  by 
creation  in  degrees  of  this  twofold  kind.  The  whole 
animal  kingdom  ...  is  in  these  degrees  in  general  and 
in  particular  ;  so  likewise  are  the  whole  vegetable  king- 
dom and  the  whole  mineral  kingdom  ;  and  also  the 
atmospheric  expanse  from  the  sun  down  to  the  earth. 
There  are  therefore  three  atmospheres  discretely  distinct 
according  to  degrees  of  height  in  both  the  Spiritual  and 
the  natural  worlds  .  .  .  And  as  the  atmospheres  descend 
from  their  origins  according  to  these  degrees,  and  are 
the  containants  of  light  and  heat  ...  it  follows  that 
there  are  three  degrees  of  light  and  of  heat :  and  as  the 
light  in  the  Spiritual  "World  is  in  its  essence  wisdom, 
and  the  heat  there  is  in  its  essence  love  ...  it  follows 
also  that  there  are  three  degrees  of  wisdom  and  three 
degrees  of  love,  consequently  three  degrees  of  life  ;  for 
they  are  graduated  by  those  things  through  which  they 
pass.  Hence  it  is  that  there  are  three  angelic  Heavens  : 
a  highest  .  .  .  where  are  Angels  of  the  highest  degree  ; 
a  middle  one  .  .  .  where  are  Angels  of  the  middle  degree  ; 
and  an  ultimate  one  .  .  .  where  are  Angels  of  the  ulti- 
mate degree.  These  Heavens  are  also  distinguished 
according  to  the  degrees  of  wisdom  and  love.  Ex. 

6.  As  the  angelic  Heavens  are  distinguished  into 

three  degrees,  so  also  is  the  human  mind  .  .  . 

.  Hence  it  is  evident  that  all  spiritual  influx  to  a 

man  and  into  a  man  descends  from  the  Lord  through 
these  three  degrees,  and  that  it  is  received  by  the  man 
according  to  the  degree  of  wisdom  and  love  in  which 
he  is. 

7.  The  Knowledge  of  these   degrees  is,   at  the 

present  day,  of  the  greatest  utility  ;  for,  in  consequence 
of  not  knowing  them,  many  persons  remain  and  cling 
in  the  lowest  degree,  in  which  are  the  senses  of  their 
body  .  .  . 

17.  Ends  are  in  the  first  degree,  causes  in  the  second, 
and  effects  in  the  third.  Gen.  art. 

3.  As  all  things  in  the  Spiritual  World,  and  all 

things  in  the  natural  world,  proceed  according  to  these 
degrees  ...  it  is  evident  that  intelligence  properly  con- 
sists in  Knowing  and  distinguishing  them,  and  in  seeing 
them  in  their  order.  By  means  of  these  degrees,  also, 
every  man  is  Known  as  to  his  quality,  when  his  love  is 
Known .  .  . 

T.  32s.  Between  the  three  degrees  of  height  there  is 
a  progression  to  infinity,  in  that  the  first  degree,  which 
is  called  natural,  cannot  be  perfected  and  elevated  to  the 
perfection  of  the  second  degree,  which  is  called  spiritual, 
nor  this  to  the  perfection  of  the  third,  which  is  called 

E 


Degree 


66 


Degree 


celestial .  .  .  This  may  be  illustrated  by  the  atmospheres, 
of  which  there  are  three  degrees  .  .  . 

[T.]  33.  One  thing  has  been  formed  from  another,  and 
thence  have  been  made  degrees,  three  in  the  Spiritual 
World,  and  three  corresponding  to  them  in  the  natural 
world,  and  as  many  in  the  quiescent  things  of  which  the 
terraqueous  globe  consists  ...  It  is  by  means  of  these 
degrees  that  all  posterior  things  are  receptacles  of  prior 
things,  and  these  of  things  still  prior,  and  thus,  in  order, 
receptacles  of  the  primitives  of  which  the  Sun  of  the 
angelic  Heaven  consists,  and  thus  that  finite  things  are 
receptacles  of  the  infinite  .  .  . 

34.  The  humankind  ...  is  formed  into  three  regions, 
according  to  three  degrees  :  in  the  first  degree  it  is 
celestial  .  .  .  ;  in  the  second  degree  it  is  spiritual  .  .  .  ; 
and  in  the  third  degree  it  is  natural  ...  If  man 
prepares  the  way  or  opens  the  door  up  to  the  highest  or 
celestial  degree,  he  becomes  truly  an  image  of  God,  and 
after  death  he  becomes  an  Angel  of  the  highest  Heaven  ; 
but  if .  .  .  only  to  the  middle  or  spiritual  degree,  man 
does  indeed  become  an  image  of  God,  but  not  in  that 
perfection,  and  after  death  he  becomes  an  Angel  of  the 
middle  Heaven  ;  but  if .  .  .  only  to  the  lowest  or  natural 
degree,  then  if  man  acknowledges  God  and  worships 
Him  with  actual  piety,  he  becomes  an  image  of  God  in 
the  lowest  degree,  and  after  death  he  becomes  an  Angel 
of  the  lowest  Heaven.  But  ...  if  man  closes  up  the 
highest  natural  degree,  which  corresponds  to  the  highest 
celestial  one,  he  becomes  as  to  love  like  a  beast  of  the 
earth  ;  if  he  closes  up  the  middle  natural  degree,  which 
corresponds  to  the  middle  spiritual  one,  he  becomes  as 
to  love  like  a  fox,  and  as  to  the  sight  of  the  understand- 
ing like  a  bird  of  evening  ;  and  if  he  closes  up  also  the 
lowest  natural  degree  as  to  its  spiritual  part,  he  becomes 
as  to  love  like  a  wild  beast,  and  as  to  the  understanding 
of  truth  like  a  fish.     E.  1 14510. 

4.  The  reception  of  the  Divine  life  in  the  highest 

degree,  (may  be  compared)  to  the  influx  of  light  into  a 
diamond  ;  the  reception  of  the  life  in  the  second  degree, 
to  the  influx  of  light  into  a  crystal ;  and  the  reception 
of  the  life  in  the  lowest  degree,  to  the  influx  of  light 
into  glass,  or  into  a  transparent  membrane  :  but  if  this 
degree  as  to  its  spiritual  part  be  entirely  closed  up, 
which  is  done  when  God  is  denied  and  Satan  worshipped, 
the  reception  of  life  from  God  may  be  compared  to  the 
influx  of  light  into  opaque  things  .  .  . 

42.  There  are  three  degrees  of  love  and  wisdom,  and 
thence  three  degrees  of  life,  and  the  human  mind  is 
formed  as  it  were  into  regions  according  to  these  degrees  ; 
life  in  the  highest  region  is  in  the  highest  degree,  in  the 
second  region,  in  a  lower  degree,  and  in  the  ultimate 
region,  in  the  lowest  degree.  .  .  The  ultimate  region,  where 
life  is  in  the  lowest  degree,  is  opened  from  infancy  to 
youth,  and  this  is  done  by  means  of  knowledges  ;  the 
second  region,  where  life  is  in  a  higher  degree,  from 
youth  to  adolescence,  and  this  is  done  by  means  of 
thoughts  from  knowledges  ;  and  the  highest  region, 
where  life  is  in  the  highest  degree,  from  adolescence  to 
early  manhood  and  onwards,  and  this  is  done  by  means 
of  perceptions  of  truths,  both  moral  and  spiritual. 

69.  The  human  mind  is  distinguished  into  three 
degrees,  like  the  angelic  Heaven,  and  therefore  it  can  be 


elevated  to  a  degree  higher  and  higher,  and  may  also  be 
let  down  to  a  degree  lower  and  lower  ;  but  in  proportion 
as  it  is  elevated  into  the  higher  degrees,  it  is  elevated 
into  wisdom  .  .  .  and  in  proportion  as  it  is  elevated 
thither,  it  is  man  ;  but  in  proportion  as  it  is  let  down 
into  the  lower  degrees,  it  is  in  the  delusive  light  of  Hell, 
and  is  not  man,  but  a  beast. 

7S4.  In  each  world  there  are  three  degrees,  which  are 
called  degrees  of  height,  and  thence  three  regions 
according  to  which  the  angelic  Heavens  are  ordained, 
and  according  to  which  human  minds  also  are 
ordained  .  .  . 

76s.  As  there  were  three  (atmospheres  created),  and 
thence  three  degrees  of  them,  three  Heavens  were  made  ; 
one  for  the  Angels  who  are  in  the  highest  degree  of  love 
and  wisdom,  another  for  the  Angels  who  are  in  the  second 
degree,  and  a  third  for  the  Angels  who  are  in  the  lowest 
degree  .  .  . 

2142.  There  are  degrees  of  purity,  according  to  which 
both  these  kinds  of  order  take  place. 

4102.  It  is  evident  that  there  are  genera  and  species, 
and  also  degrees,  of  love  towards  the  neighbour. 

498.  There  are  three  degrees  of  life  with  man  ;  the 
soul,  the  mind,  and  the  sensuous  body  ;  everything  that 
is  in  a  higher  degree,  is  in  perfection  above  that  which 
is  in  a  lower  degree. 

608.  There  are  three  Heavens,  which  are  distinct  from 
each  other  according  to  the  three  degrees  of  love  and 
wisdom  ;  and  man  is  in  communion  with  Angels  from 
these  three  Heavens  according  to  his  regeneration  ;  and 
as  this  is  so,  the  human  mind  is  distinguished  into  three 
degrees  or  regions  according  to  the  Heavens.  .  .  These 
three  degrees,  according  to  which  the  Heavens  are  dis- 
tinguished .  .  .  are  like  the  head,  body,  and  feet  in 
man  .  .  . 

609.  These  three  degrees  are  as  gold,  silver,  and 
copper  are  in  relative  nobility,  with  which  metals  they 
are  also  compared  in  Nebuchadnezzar's  statue.  These 
three  degrees  are  also  distinguished  from  each  other  as 
are  the  ruby,  the  sapphire,  and  the  agate,  in  relative 
purity  and  goodness  ;  and  also  as  an  olive-tree,  a  vine, 
and  a  fig-tree  ;  and  so  on. 


Ad.  633.  The  second  kind  of  order  exists  between 
those  things  which  come  forth  in  one  degree  simul- 
taneously, and  is  therefore  called  simultaneous  order. 

D.  1526.  The  Angels  of  the  third  degree  are  able  to 
be  in  this  sphere  [without  injury]. 

314.  It  was  conceded  to  them  to  feel  heavenly  joy  to 
their  inmost  degree  .  .  . 

835.  In  each  degree  there  are  three  Heavens  ;  the 
Spiritual,  that  of  peace,  and  that  of  innocence  ;  no  one 
is  admitted  into  the  inmost  Heaven  of  the  higher  degree. 
unless  he  has  been  in  the  more  internal  one. 

1828.  Wherefore,  there  are  three  degrees  of  life  with- 
in man,  as  there  are  three  degrees  of  life  in  the  Heavens 
.  .  .  which  are  distinguished  into  the  interior  one,  which 
is  of  the  natural  mind  ;  the  more  interior  one,  which  is 
of  the  intellectual  mind  ;  and  the  inmost  one,  which 
corresponds  to  the  Third  Heaven. 


Degree 


67 


Degree 


2191.  That  in  the  interior  Heaven  there  are  degrees 
of  Angels. 

.  There  are  three  Heavens  .  .  .  which  are  dis- 
tinguished from  each  other  as  to  degrees.  .  .  But  these 
degrees  are  in  general.  In  each  Heaven  also  there  exist 
degrees  of  happinesses,  in  fact,  as  I  suppose,  three, 
which  however  are  not  so  circumstanced  in  relation  to 
each  other  as  are  the  degrees  of  the  Heavens  in  general. 
From  the  degrees  in  the  body  it  may  be  allowable  to 
suppose  that  there  are  three.  Ex. 

.  Hearing,  ocular  sight,  and  the  sight  of  imagina- 
tion, differ  from  each  other  by  degrees,  yet  all  relate  to 
natural  things  .  .  . 

2947.  On  the  four  degrees  of  faith.  (Scientific  faith, 
intellectual  faith,  persxiasion,  and  the  persuasion  which 
is  conjoined  with  perception.) 

46273.  The  interior  [degrees]  of  man,  which  do  not 
die,  thus  succeed  each  other :  the  Sensuous,  the  Natural, 
the  Spiritual  Natural :  these  are  of  the  external  man. 
Afterwards  come  the  Celestial  Spiritual,  the  Celestial, 
and  the  Inmost  which  wants  a  name,  because  it  receives 
immediately  the  good  and  truth  which  proceed  from  the 
Lord :  these  are  of  the  internal  man.  The  medium 
between  the  internal  and  the  external  man  is  called  the 
Spiritual  Celestial.  Ex. 

4734.  Evil  Spirits  dwell  in  caves  ...  to  which  you 
descend  by  steps. 

5547.  On  Heaven  in  general,  and  on  its  degrees. 
.  There  are  Heavens  above   Heavens  .  .  .  There 

are  seven  degrees  of  them  .  .  .  the  internal  ones  are 
distinguished  into  three,  and  the  external  ones  into 
three,  and  between  the  internal  and  the  external  ones 
there  exist  intermediate  ones  which  are  called  the 
celestial  spiritual  ones  :  hence  it  is  that  there  are  seven 
degrees. 

5548.  The  first  degree  ...  is  of  the  Lord  alone,  and 
may  be  called  the  very  habitation  of  the  Lord  in  Heaven, 
for  what  goes  on  there  an  Angel  does  not  know  .  .  .  The 
second  degree  among  the  internal  ones,  is  that  which 
does  indeed  come  to  their  perception,  but  as  the  internal 
of  man  to  his  external.  The  third  degree  is  that  in 
which  are  those  Angels,  and  is  where  they  have  their 
perception  ;  their  human  is  there,  and  their  soul  is  in 
the  second  one. 

5549-  The  Angels  in  the  Spiritual  Heaven  are  not  in 
internals,  but  in  externals  ;  this  external  is  also  tripar- 
tite .  .  .  The  external  which  accedes  to  the  sensuous 
external  in  the  world  is  quiescent ;  in  the  middle  they 
live  as  to  thought  and  perception  ;  the  internal  is  to 
them  as  a  soul.  They  indeed  have  the  internal  which  is 
above,  but  it  is  closed  up.  Communication  is  effected 
with  them  through  the  Celestial  Spiritual  Heaven,  across 
the  Celestial  one.  Hence  it  is  that  the  spiritual  Angels 
are  in  the  internal  Natural. 

5550.  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  there  are  three  degrees 
of  Heavens,  that  is,  of  Angels  in  the  Heavens.  The 
same  number  of  degrees  exist  with  men  in  the  world 
who  are  Angels ;  but  at  that  time  they  do  not  know 
what  is  going  on  in  their  internals  ;  these  are  opened 
after  death. 


5551.  These  degrees  are  entirely  distinct  from  each 
other  .  .  . 

E.  14116.  To  all  the  forbidden  degrees  (Lev.xx.  11-21) 
correspond  such  spheres  (of  whoredom),  with  a  difference 
according  to  the  application  of  truths  to  falsities,  and 
according  to  the  conjunction  of  falsities  with  evils  .  .  . 

2537.  'The  six  steps'  (1  Kings x.  19)  =  all  things  from 
primes  to  ultimates. 

27510.  'The  steps  which  Jehovah  builds  in  the 
heavens'  (Amos  ix. 6)= interior  truths,  which  are  called 
spiritual  ones. 

3143.  '  Lamb  '= innocence  of  the  inmost  degree  .  .  . 
' Kid '  =  innocence  of  the  second  degree.  .  .  'Calf'  = 
innocence  of  the  ultimate  degree.  .  .  Innocence  of  the 
inmost  degree  is  such  as  is  in  the  Third  Heaven  .  .  . 
Innocence  of  the  second  degree  is  such  as  is  iu  the 
Second  Heaven  .  .  .  Innocence  of  the  ultimate  degree  is 
such  as  is  in  the  First  Heaven. 

6.  '  Lambs,  rams,  and  he-goats '  =  the  three  degrees 

of  the  good  of  innocence  ;  the  same  as  '  lambs,  rams, 
and  calves' (See  A.  10042.   10132.)    8. 

342s.  There  are  three  Heavens,  and  each  Heaven  is  dis- 
tinguished into  three  degrees  ;  in  like  manner  the  Angels 
who  are  in  them ;  wherefore,  in  each  Heaven  there  are 
higher,  middle,  and  lower  ones.  These  three  degrees  of 
the  ultimate  Heaven  are  meant  by  'those  who  are  in 
Heaven,'  'those  who  are  in  the  earth,'  and  'those  who 
are  in  the  sea.' 

3752.  The  Third  Heaven  is  in  inmost  goods,  or  those 
of  the  third  degree  ;  the  Second  Heaven  is  in  lower 
goods  and  truths,  or  those  of  the  second  degree ;  and 
the  First  Heaven  is  in  ultimate  goods  and  truths,  or 
those  of  the  first  degree.  Ultimate  goods  and  truths, 
or  those  of  the  first  degree,  are  such  as  are  contained 
in  the  sense  of  the  letter  of  the  Word  .  .  . 

4009.  'Steps'  (Ezek.xxxviii.2o)  =  the  truths  thence 
derived. 

436.  ("With  those  in  the  Third  Heaven)  the  three 
degrees  of  life  are  opened  ;  the  inmost  is  where  love  to 
the  Lord  resides,  the  middle  where  truths  from  that 
good,  and  the  ultimate  where  the  good  of  life. 

4492.  There  are  with  man  three  degrees  of  life ;  in- 
most, middle,  and  ultimate  ;  the  inmost  degree  is  that 
in  which  are  they  who  are  in  the  Third  Heaven,  the 
middle  degree  is  that  in  which  are  they  who  are  in  the 
Second  Heaven,  and  the  ultimate  degree  is  that  in 
which  are  they  who  are  in  the  First  Heaven  ;  wherefore, 
they  who  are  in  the  inmost  degree  are  called  celestial, 
they  who  are  in  the  middle  one  are  called  spiritual,  and 
they  who  are  in  ultimate  Heaven  are  called  either 
spiritual  natural  or  celestial  natural.  The  conjunction 
of  these  in  the  ultimate  Heaven  is  signified  by 
'Benjamin.' 

538.  Truths  there  appear  as  of  water.  .  .  The  reason 
is,  that  there  are  three  degrees  of  man's  life,  as  there 
are  three  Heavens  ;  they  with  whom  the  third  degree 
has  been  opened  are  as  it  were  in  a  pure  ethereal  atmo- 
sphere .  .  .  ;  they,  however,  in  whom  only  the  second 
degree  has  been  opened,  are  as  it  were  in  an  aerial 
atmosphere  .  .  .  ;  but  they  in  whom  only  the  first  degree 


Degree 


G8 


Degree 


has  been  opened,  are  as  it  were  in  a  watery  atmosphere, 
thin  and  pure. 

[E.]  563-.  There  are  three  degrees  of  life  with  every 
man  ;  inmost,  middle,  and  ultimate  ;  and  man  becomes 
more  perfect,  that  is,  wiser,  in  the  proportion  that  he 
becomes  more  interior  .  .  . 
625s.  See  Mind  at  this  ref. 

627s.  In  its  descent,  Divine  truth  proceeds  according 
to  degrees  from  the  highest  or  inmost  to  the  lowest  or 
ultimate  ;  Divine  truth  in  the  highest  degree  is  such  as 
is  the  Divine  which  proximately  proceeds  from  the  Lord, 
thus  such  as  is  the  Divine  truth  above  the  Heavens  ; 
being  infinite,  this  cannot  come  to  the  perception  of  any 
Angel.  Divine  truth  of  the  first  degree,  however,  is 
that  which  reaches  the  perception  of  the  Angels  of  the 
Third  Heaven,  and  is  called  Divine  truth  celestial ;  from 
this  is  the  wisdom  of  these  Angels.  Divine  truth  of  the 
second  degree  is  that  which  reaches  the  perception  of 
the  Angels  of  the  Second  Heaven,  and  makes  their 
wisdom  and  intelligence,  being  called  Divine  truth 
spiritual.  Divine  truth  of  the  third  degree  is  that 
which  reaches  the  perception  of  the  Angels  of  the  First 
Heaven,  and  makes  their  intelligence  and  knowledge, 
and  is  called  Divine  truth  celestial  and  spiritual  natural. 
Divine  truth  of  the  fourth  degree  is  that  which  reaches 
the  perception  of  the  men  of  the  Church  who  are  living 
in  the  world,  and  makes  their  intelligence  and  know- 
ledge ;  this  is  called  Divine  truth  natural.  The  ultimate 
of  this  is  called  Divine  truth  sensuous.  These  Divine 
truths  are  in  order  in  the  Word  according  to  their 
degrees  ;  and  Divine  truth  in  the  ultimate  degree  or  in 
the  ultimate  of  order  is  such  as  is  the  Divine  truth  in 
the  sense  of  the  letter  of  the  Word  for  little  children 
and  the  extremely  simple  who  are  sensuous.  Sig. 

629A  Height  =  both  truth  and  good  as  to  degrees: 
the  degrees  of  truth  and  of  good  are  such  as  are  truth 
and  good  interiorly  .  .  .  and  exteriorly. 

70616.  'The  degrees  of  Ahaz'  (Is.xxxviii.S)  =  thetime  ; 
here,  up  to  the  Lord's  Advent.  .  .  The  whole  time  of  the 
duration  of  the  Jewish  Church  was  represented  by  'the 
degrees  of  Ahaz;'  its  beginning  by  the  first  degree, 
which  is  when  the  sun  is  rising,  and  its  end  by  the  last 
degree  at  sunset. 

7084.  The  reason  why  (the  Heavens  which  are  under 
the  Lord  as  a'JVIoon)  are  interior  ones,  middle  ones,  and 
exterior  ones,  is  that  the  Natural  is  distinguished  into 
three  degrees,  in  the  same  way  as  the  Spiritual ;  the 
exterior  Natural  communicates  with  the  world,  the 
interior  with  Heaven,  and  the  middle  conjoins  . 

71029.  The  marriage  of  the  understanding  of  truth  and 
good  with  the  affection  of  truth  and  good  is  in  general 
from  a  triple  origin,  and  thence  in  a  triple  degree ;  in 
the  highest  degree  is  the  marriage  of  those  who 'are 
called  celestial,  in  a  lower  one  is  the  marriage  among 
those  who  are  spiritual,  and  in  the  lowest  one  among 
those  who  are  natural ;  for  there  are  as  many  degrees  o'f 
the  interiors  of  man  ;  hence  there  are  three  Heavens 

33.  The  goods  of  Heaven  and  of  the  Church  are 

of  three  degrees  ;  the  good  of  the  inmost  degree  ...  is 
called  the  good  of  celestial  love ;  the  good  of  a  lower 
degree  ...  is  called  the  good  of  spiritual  love  ;  and  the 
good  of  the  lowest  degree  ...  is  called  natural  good. 


7148.  (The  Solifidians)  have  excogitated  degrees, 
which  they  call  the  progressions  of  faith  alone.  Enum. 
7874,Enum. 

7392.  With  men  there  are  three  degrees  of  life  ;  in- 
most, middle,  and  ultimate ;  and  these  degrees  are 
successively  opened  with  a  man,  as  he  becomes  wise. 
Every  man  is  born  utterly  sensuous  .  .  .  He  afterwards 
becomes  interiorly  sensuous  ;  but  in  proportion  as  he 
procures  natural  lumen  by  means  of  visual  experience, 
knowledges,  and  especially  by  means  of  the  uses  of 
moral  life,  the  man  becomes  interiorly  natural :  this  is 
the  first  or  ultimate  degree  of  man's  life.  .  .  He  then 
imbibes  the  Knowledges  of  spiritual  good  and  truth  .  .  . 
and  thus  founds  the  Church  in  himself ;  but  still,  if  he 
does  not  advance  further,  he  remains  natural ;  but  if  he 
does  advance  further,  that  is,  if  he  lives  according  to 
these  Knowledges  from  the  Word,  he  opens  with  himself 
an  interior  degree,  and  becomes  spiritual,  yet  not  more 
than  as  he  is  affected  with  truths,  understands  them, 
wills  them,  and  does  them  .  .  .  The  reason  why  the 
interior  degree  cannot  be  otherwise  opened,  is  that  the 
evils  and  falsities  which  are  in  the  natural  man  keep  it 
closed  ;  for  the  spiritual  degree,  or  the  spiritual  mind, 
contracts  itself  at  evil  and  the  falsity  of  evil,  as  a  fibril 
of  the  body  at  a  sting  .  .  .  But  when  homogeneous  things, 
which  are  Divine  truths  from  the  Word  that  derive  their 
essence  from  good,  approach  this  mind,  it  opens  itself ; 
yet  the  opening  takes  place  only  by  the  reception  of  the 
good  of  love  which  flows  in  through  Heaven  from  the 
Lord,  and  by  the  conjunction  thereof  with  the  truths 
which  the  man  has  committed  to  memory  ;  this  takes 
place  only  by  means  of  a  life  according  to  the  Divine 
truths  in  the  Word  .  ,  .  Hence  it  is  evident  how  the 
second  or  middle  degree  is  opened. 

4.  The  third  or   inmost  degree  is  opened  with 

those  who  at  once  apply  Divine  truths  to  life,  and  do 
not  first  reason  about  them  from  the  memory,  and 
thereby  get  them  into  doubt :  this  degree  is  called 
celestial.  As  these  three  degrees  of  life  exist  with  every 
man,  but  are  variously  opened,  there  are  three  Heavens  ; 
in  the  Third  Heaven  are  they  with  whom  the  third  degree 
has  been  opened  ;  in  the  Second  Heaven  are  they  with 
whom  only  the  second  degree  has  been  opened ;  and  in  the 
First  Heavenare  they  with  whom  theinterior  natural  man, 
which  is  also  called  the  rational  man,  has  been  opened  .  .  . 

74618.  Three  degrees  of  hatred  are  here  described  (by 
'being  angry,'  'calling  raka'  and  'fool')  .  .  .  All  these 
degrees  are  degrees  of  hatred  against  the  good  of  charity 
.  .  . ;  and  three  degrees  of  punishment  are  signified  by  'the 
judgment,'  'the  council,'  and  'the  Gehenna  of  fire'  .  .  . 

76S'7.  For  there  are  degrees  of  Divine  truth,  as  there 
are  degrees  of  its  reception  by  the  Angels  in  the  three 
Heavens  and  in  the  Church.  .  .  But  'the  seed  of  Abra- 
ham, Isaac,  and  Jacob,'  here  mean  all  who  are  of  the 
Lord's  Church,  in  every  degree. 

832s.  There  are  three  degrees  of  life  with  man  ;  the 
third  degree  is  that  in  which  are  the  Angels  of  the 
Third  Heaven  ;  the  second  degree  is  that  in  which  are 
the  Angels  of  the  Second  Heaven  ;  and  the  first  degree 
is  that  in  which  are  the  Angels  of  the  First  Heaven. 
There  is  also  a  lowest  degree,  which  is  corporeal  and 
material,  and  which  exists  with  man  while  he  lives  in 


Degree 


69 


Degree 


the  world.  These  degrees  are  opened  with  man  accord- 
ing to  the  reception  of  Divine  truth  in  his  life  .  .  .  ; 
and  as  love  and  the  life  of  man  make  one,  it  follows  that 
there  are  as  many  degrees  of  love  as  there  are  of  life. 
Enum. 

7.  They  who  are  in  the  third  degree  of  love  and 

thence  of  wisdom,  live  in  an  atmosphere  as  it  were 
purely  ethereal ;  they  who  are  in  the  second  degree  of 
love  and  thence  of  intelligence,  live  in  an  atmosphere  as 
it  were  purely  aerial ;  and  they  who  are  in  the  first 
degree  of  love  and  thence  of  knowledge,  live  in  an 
atmosphere  as  it  were  purely  aqueous  ;  and  as  the  purity 
of  their  life  is  in  a  like  degree  with  their  love,  ^t  is 
evident  that  they  who  are  in  the  Third  Heaven  .  .  . 
cannot  be  approached  by  those  who  are  in  the  Second 
and  First .  .  . 

8^62.  '  Egypt '  =  the  natural  understanding  of  the 
Word,  'Asshur'  the  rational  understanding,  'Israel' 
the  spiritual  understanding,  and  'Ephraim'  the  under- 
standing itself  of  the  Word  in  the  Church.  But  these 
three  degrees  of  understanding ;  natural,  rational,  and 
spiritual,  must  be  one,  in  order  for  man  from  enlighten- 
ment to  see  and  perceive  the  genuine  truths  of  the 
Word  .  .  . 

11252.  No  idea  of  the  life  which  is  God  can  be  had, 
unless  there'  is  also  procured  an  idea  of  the  degrees 
through  which  life  descends  from  inmosts  to  ultimates. 
There  is  an  inmost  degree  of  life,  and  there  is  an 
ultimate  degree  of  life,  and  there  are  intermediate 
degrees  of  life  :  the  distinction  is  as  between  things  prior 
and  posterior  ;  for  a  posterior  degree  comes  forth  from  a 
prior  one,  and  so  on  ;  and  the  difference  is  as  between 
things  less  and  more  general ;  for  that  which  is  of  a 
prior  degree  is  less  general,  and  that  which  is  of  a 
posterior  one  is  more  so.  Such  degrees  of  life  are  in 
every  man  from  creation,  and  are  opened  according  to 
the  reception  of  life  from  the  Lord ;  in  some  there  is 
opened  the  last  degree  but  one,  in  some  the  middle  one, 
and  in  some  the  inmost  one.  The  men  in  whom  the 
inmost  degree  is  opened,  after  death  become  Angels  of 
the  Third  Heaven  ;  they  in  whom  the  middle  degree  is 
opened,  after  death  become  Angels  of  the  Second 
Heaven  ;  but  they  in  whom  the  last  degree  but  one  is 
opened,  after  death  become  Angels  of  the  Ultimate 
Heaven.  These  degrees  are  called  degrees  of  man's  life, 
but  they  are  degrees  of  his  wisdom  and  of  his  love, 
because  they  are  opened  according  to  the  reception  of 
wisdom  and  love,  thus  of  life  from  the  Lord.  Such 
degrees  of  life  also  exist  in  every  organ,  viscus,  and 
member  of  the  body,  and  act  as  one  with  the  degrees  of 
life  in  the  brains  by  influx  ;  the  skins,  cartilages,  and 
bones  constitute  the  ultimate  of  their  degree.  The 
reason  there  are  such  degrees  in  man,  is  that  there  are 
such  degrees  of  the  life  which  proceeds  from  the  Lord  ; 
but  in  the  Lord  they  are  life,  whereas  in  man  they  are 
recipients  of  life.  But ...  in  the  Lord  there  are  degrees 
still  higher,  and  all,  both  highest  and  ultimate,  are 
life  ;  for  the  Lord  teaches  that  He  is  the  Life,  and  also 
that  He  has  flesh  and  bones. 

11273.  Life  itself  with  him  is  man,  both  sensuous  and 
natural,  and  rational,  spiritual,  and  celestial ;  so  are 
called  the  degrees  of  life. 


1 1442.  In  proportion  as  he  is  not  wise,  he  stands  still 
in  the  first  degree,  which  is  to  love  himself  and  the 
world  .  .  . 

1 145.  There  are  three  degrees  of  life  in  man,  which, 
regarded  in  their  order,  are  called  celestial,  spiritual, 
and  natural ;  in  the  same  order  there  are  mentioned  in 
this  verse  such  things  as  signify  goods  and  truths  accord- 
ing to  degrees. 

1 147.  The  Natural  of  man  is  a  trine;  rational, 
natural,  and  sensuous  ;  the  Rational  is  the  highest 
there,  the  Sensuous  is  the  lowest  there,  and  the  Natural 
is  the  intermediate  .  .  .  Men  who  think,  judge,  and 
conclude  well  from  reason,  are  rational  .  .  .  They  who 
are  sensuous  think  from  material  things  and  in  them 
.  .  .  And  as  there  exist  these  two  degrees,  there  also 
exists  an  intermediate,  which  is  called  natural .  .  .  The 
same  are  also  Known  in  the  Spiritual  World,  for  there 
exist  the  same  number  of  degrees  of  natural  men  in  the 
ultimate  Heaven  .  .  . 

1 1 70.  Wisdom  is  in  the  third  degree,  intelligence  in 
the  second  one,  and  knowledge  in  the  first  or  ultimate 
one.  Sig. 

1 1 85.  Affections  are  of  two  kinds,  spiritual  and  celestial 
.  .  .  but  are  of  three  degrees  ;  inmost,  middle,  and  outer- 
most ;  inmost,  such  as  are  in  the  inmost  Heaven ; 
middle,  such  as  are  in  the  middle  Heaven ;  and  outer- 
most, such  as  are  in  ultimate  Heaven. 

12014.  The  souls  of  beasts  are  not  spiritual  in  that 
degree  in  which  the  souls  of  men  are,  but  are  spiritual 
in  a  lower  degree,  for  there  are  degrees  of  spiritual 
things ;  and  affections  of  a  lower  degree,  although, 
regarded  from  their  origin,  they  are  spiritual,  are  still 
to  be  called  natural :  they  are  so  to  be  called  because 
they  are  like  the  affections  of  the  natural  man.  There 
are  in  man  three  degrees  of  natural  affections,  and  the 
same  in  beasts ;  in  the  lowest  degree  are  insects  of 
various  kinds,  in  a  higher  one  are  the  flying  things  of 
heaven,  and  in  a  still  higher  one  are  the  beasts  of  the 
earth,  which  have  been  created  from  the  beginning. 

12024.  Knowledge  belongs  to  wisdom,  and  affection 
to  love  in  the  degree  which  is  called  natural. 

5.  The  spiritual  mind  is  such,  that  it  can  view 

and  love  truths  and  goods  in  every  degree,  both  con- 
jointly with  the  natural  mind,  and  abstractedly  from 
it.  .  . 

12102.  For  there  are  degrees  of  spiritual  things,  and 
each  degree  is  distinct  from  another,  and  a  prior  or 
higher  degree  is  more  perfect  than  a  posterior  or  lower 
one  .  .  .  For  there  are  degrees  of  heat,  which  in  Heaven 
is  love,  and  according  to  these  degrees  the  Angels  have 
wisdom,  intelligence,  and  knowledge. 

3.  The  same  number  of  degrees  also  exist  below 

the  Heavens,  that  is,  in  nature,  which  are  lower  degrees 
of  spiritual  things  ;  as  may  be  evident  from  the  natural 
mind  of  man,  and  from  his  rationality  and  sensuousness  ; 
rational  men  are  in  its  first  degree,  sensuous  men  in  its 
ultimate  one,  and  some  in  the  middle  one  ;  and  all  the 
thought  and  affection  of  the  natural  mind  is  spiritual. 

.  These  three  forces,  which  are  the  force  of  acting, 

the  force  of  creating,  and  the  force  of  forming,  are  in  the 
Spiritual  in  every  degree  thereof,  but  with  a  difference 
of  perfection  .  .  . 


Degree 


70 


Degree 


[E.]  12 1 2.  'Small  and  great '  =  all  who  are  in  truths 
and  goods,  in  every  degree. 

12242.  In  every  man  there  are  three  degrees  of  life  ; 
a  lowest  one  which  he  has  in  common  -with  beasts,  and 
two  higher  ones  which  he  has  not  in  common  with  them  ; 
by  these  two  higher  degrees  man  is  man  ;  they  are 
closed  with  the  evil,  but  opened  with  the  good :  but 
these  degrees  are  not  closed  with  the  evil  against  the 
light  of  Heaven,  which  is  the  wisdom  that  proceeds 
from  the  Lord  as  a  Sun,  but  they  are  closed  against  its 
heat,  which  is  the  love  that  proceeds  simultaneously 
thence.  This  is  why  even  an  evil  man  possesses  the 
faculty  of  understanding  .  .  . 

Ath.  177.  The  Divine  proceeding  before  the  Advent 
of  the  Lord,  is  described  by  circles  and  by  degrees  .  .  . 
The  degrees  are  successive  .  .  .  Wherefore,  while  there 
is  reception  in  every  degree,  they  correspond  with  each 
other,  and  they  thus  as  it  were  transfer  to  each  other  ; 
but  when  in  the  ultimate  degree  there  was  no  longer  a 
reception  of  the  Divine  .  .  .  the  Divine  proceeding  could 
not  be  extended  thither. 

178.  All  things  have  been  so  created  .  .  .  that  the 
love  which  is  of  good,  or  the  good  which  is  of  affection 
and  love,  induces  on  itself  what  is  human  in  every  single 
degree  from  first  to  last.  .  .  That  there  is  such  a  nature 
in  each  single  degree  ...  is  because  that  which  proceeds 
from  the  Lord  proceeds  from  every  single  thing  of  His 
body,  interior  and  exterior. 

J. (Post.)  104.  The  vision  suddenly  descended  as  by 
steps. 

303.  On  degrees.     (A  short  treatise. ) 

305.  In  each  Kingdom  there  are  two  degrees  ;  in  the 
Natural  one  two,  in  the  Spiritual  one  two,  in  the 
Celestial  one  two ;  thus  in  the  three  Kingdoms  there 
are  six  degrees. 

306.  All  these  degrees  are  discrete,  or  discontinuous, 
and  are  called  degrees  of  height. 

307.  Discrete  degrees  are  circumstanced  as  are  thought 
and  speech,  or  as  are  affection  and  gesture,  or  as  are  the 
affection  of  the  mind  and  the  expression  of  the  face  ; 
also,  in  the  material  world,  as  are  the  ether  and  the  air ; 
as  a  nerve  and  the  fibres  of  which  the  nerve  is  composed. 
All  compositions  in  the  universal  natural  and  Spiritual 
"Worlds  are  of  this  character,  and  consist  in  their  order 
of  two  or  three  of  this  manner  of  degrees.  These  degrees 
are  called  prior  and  posterior  ones,  higher  and  lower  ones, 

nterior  and  exterior  ones  ;  and  in  general  are  circum- 
stanced as  are  the  cause  and  the  effect,  or  as  the  substance 
and  the  substantiate  ...  or  as  the  beginning  and  the 
derivative  .  .  . 

30S.  There  are  also  continuous  or  coherent  degrees ; 
every  discrete  degree  has  a  continuous  degree  ;  the  con- 
tinuous degree  of  each  discrete  degree  is  circumstanced 
as  light  decreasing  to  shade  and  finally  to  the  darkness 
of  night ;  and  is  also  as  rational  thought,  which  is  in 
light,  decreasing  to  sensuous  thought,  and  finally  to  as 
it  were  corporeal  thought,  which  is  in  dense  shade 
according  to  the  descent  towards  the  body.  In  such  a 
decreasing  continuous  degree  is  the  human  mind  ...  In 
a  like  degree,  but  lower,  are  man's  sight,  hearing,  smell, 
taste,  and  touch  ;  and  so  are  his  speech  aud  song  ...  In 


like  manner  harmonies  among  themselves,  and  beauties 
among  themselves  ;  for  they  succeed  each  other  by  a 
continuous  degree  from  the  most  perfect  harmony  and 
beauty  to  the  least  of  harmony  and  beauty.  These 
degrees  are  of  the  cause  itself  in  itself  and  of  the  effect 
itself  in  itself ;  they  are  distinguished  from  the  former 
kind  of  degrees,  (for)  if  these  are  (degTees)  of  the  cause 
and  the  effect  themselves  as  related  to  each  other,  con- 
tinuous degrees  are  called  degrees  of  what  is  purer  and 
grosser.  An  idea  of  these  degrees  may  be  especially 
obtained  from  light  and  shade  .  .  . 

310.  Few  have  heretofore  had  any  idea  of  degrees, 
except  an  idea  of  a  continuous  degree,  which  is  from 
purer  to  grosser  .  .  .  from  which  it  flows  that  there  is 
only  one  degree,  and  that  the  natural  degree  and  the 
spiritual  degree  are  distinct  from  each  other  only  as 
what  is  pure  and  what  is  gross  .  .  .  when  yet  they  differ 
according  to  discrete  degrees. 

311.  There  are  .  .  .  six  discrete  degrees  ;  two  in  the 
Natural  Kingdom,  two  in  the  Spiritual  Kingdom,  and 
two  in  the  Celestial  Kingdom  ;  but  these  are  degrees  in 
which  are  man  and  Angel  as  to  thoughts,  affections, 
and  thence  wisdom  ;  thus  are  they  degrees.  Below 
these  six  degrees  of  life  there  follow  like  degrees,  and 
material  ones  down  to  the  ultimate ;  and  above  these 
six  degrees  there  ascend  infinite  degrees  up  to  the 
Divine  itself ;  for  the  Divine  itself  cannot  flow  in  with 
any  Angel  or  man  from  itself  except  through  discrete 
degrees  ...  It  would  be  as  if  the  sun  of  this  world  .  .  . 
were  not  to  flow  in  immediately  through  the  atmospheres 
according  to  distinct  discrete  degrees. 

312.  From  these  three  atmospheres  all  the  corporeal 
and  material  things  of  the  Earth  are  held  together, 
which  are  compounded  in  relation  to  these  three  degrees. 

De  Verbo  11.  There  are  three  Heavens,  one  below 
another,  and  the  world  under  them  ;  in  the  highest 
Heaven  there  is  angelic  wisdom  in  the  highest  degree, 
which  is  called  celestial  wisdom  ;  in  the  middle  Heaven 
there  is  angelic  wisdom  in  the  middle  degree,  which  is 
called  spiritual  wisdom  ;  in  the  ultimate  Heaven  there 
is  angelic  wisdom  in  the  ultimate  degree,  which  is 
called  spiritual  and  celestial  natural ;  and  in  the  world 
.  .  .  there  is  wisdom  in  the  lowest  degree,  which  is  called 
natural.  All  these  degrees  of  wisdom  are  in  the  Word 
.  .  .  but  in  simultaneous  order. 

D.  Love  iie.  The  substances  and  matters  in  man  are 
adapted  to  the  reception  of  life  in  its  own  order  and  in 
its  own  degree. 

xi.  That  there  are  degrees  of  affections  and  of  uses. 

.  There    are    continuous    degrees    and    discrete 

degrees  :  the  latter  and  the  former  exist  in  every  form 
in  both  the  Spiritual  World  and  the  natural  world. 
All  are  acquainted  with  continuous  degrees,  but  few 
with  discrete  degrees,  and  they  who  are  not  acquainted 
with  the  latter,  grope  as  in  darkness  when  investigating 
the  causes  of  things.  .  .  Continuous  degrees,  which  all 
are  acquainted  with,  are  as  degrees  from  light  to  shade, 
from  heat  to  cold,  from  rarity  to  density  ;  there  is  such  a 
degree  of  light,  heat,  wisdom,  and  love  in  every  Society 
of  Heaven.  Ex. 

2.  But  discrete   degrees  are  entirely   different : 

these  do  not  proceed  on  a  surface  towards   the  sides 


Degree 


71 


Deign 


around,  but  from  highest  to  lowest,  wherefore  they  are 
called  descending  degrees ;  they  are  discrete  as  are 
efficient  causes  and  their  effects,  which  again  become 
efficient  down  to  the  ultimate  effect ;  and  they  are  as  a 
producing  force  to  the  forces  produced,  which  again 
become  producing  forces  down  to  the  last  force  pro- 
duced ;  in  a  word,  they  are  degrees  of  the  formation  of 
one  thing  from  another,  thus  from  the  first  or  highest 
to  the  ultimate  or  lowest,  where  formation  stands  still ; 
wherefore,  things  prior  and  things  posterior  .  .  .  are 
these  degrees. 

.  All  creation  has  been  effected  by  means  of  these 

degrees,  and  all  production  is  effected  by  means  of  them, 
and  all  composition  in  the  world  of  nature  in  like 
manner ;  for  if  you  unfold  any  compound  thing,  you 
will  see  that  one  thing  therein  is  from  another,  even  to 
the  outermost,  which  is  the  general  of  all. 

3.  The  three  angelic  Heavens  are  distinguished 

from  each  other  by  such  degrees,  wherefore  one  is  above 
another.  The  interiors  of  man,  which  belong  to  his 
mind,  are  also  distinguished  from  each  other  by  such 
degrees.  In  like  manner  the  light  which  is  wisdom, 
and  the  heat  which  is  love,  in  the  Heavens  of  the  Angels 
and  in  the  interiors  of  men.  In  like  maimer  the  light 
itself  which  proceeds  from  the  Lord  as  a  Sun,  and  also 
the  heat  itself,  which  also  proceeds  thence  ...  In  like 
manner  wisdom  ;  for,  in  the  Spiritual  World,  light  and 
wisdom  are  in  an  equal  degree  of  perfection.  Similar, 
therefore,  are  the  degrees  of  affections  ;  and,  as  there 
are  degrees  of  affections,  there  are  also  degrees  of  uses, 
for  uses  are  the  subjects  of  affections. 

e.  In   every  form,    both   spiritual   and   natural, 

there  are  degrees  both  discrete  and  continuous  ;  with- 
out discrete  degrees,  there  is  nothing  interior  in  a  form 
to  constitute  its  cause  or  soul ;  and  without  continuous 
degrees  there  is  no  extension  or  appearance  of  it. 

xiiie.  Every  least  one  of  the  degrees  in  man,  from  its 
use  is  a  man.  Ex. 

xx2.  In  the  creation  of  the  universe,  the  Lord  has 
prepared  for  Himself  all  means  from  primes  to  ultimates, 
by  means  of  which  He  may  produce  uses  in  every 
degree  .  .  . 

D.  Wis.  ii.  (The  will  and  understanding)  are  forms 
within  forms,  ascending  to  the  third  degree.  Des. 

iii.  4.  The  receptacles  are  distinguished  with  man 
into  three  degrees,  one  within  another,  and  the  two 
higher  ones  are  habitations  of  the  Lord,  but  not  the 
lowest.  Gen.  art. 

.  This  primitive  brain  in  the  upper  gibbous  part 

was  a  compages  of  contiguous  globules  or  spherules,  each 
spherule  being  conglomerated  of  similar  but  minuter 
ones  ;  and  each  of  these  again  of  most  minute  ones  .  .  . 
Such  is  the  primitive  of  man  as  it  has  been  shown  me  ; 
of  which  the  first  or  lowest  degree  was  the  compages  first 
described,  the  second  or  middle  degree  was  the  compages 
next  described,  and  the  third  or  highest  degree  was  the 
compages  thirdly  described ;  thus  one  was  within 
another.  I  was  told  that  in  each  spherule  there  are 
ineffable  contextures,  more  and  more  wonderful  accord- 
ing to  the  degrees  .  .  . 

2.  It  was  further  shown  .  .  .  that,  as  to  situation 

and  flux,  the  mass  of  the  two  interior  degrees  was  in 


the  order  and  form  of  Heaven,  but  the  mass  of  the 
lowest  degree  as  to  situation  and  flux  was  in  the  order 
and  form  of  Hell  .  .  .  This  pollution  of  the  natural  is 
not  wiped  away,  unless  the  interior  degrees  are 
oi^ened  .  .  . 

.  These  degrees  are  called  higher,  although  they 

are  interior  ;  the  reason  is  that  there  is  a  successive  and 
also  a  simultaneous  order  of  degrees  .  .  . 

.  As  there  are  three  degrees  iu  man,  there  are 

three  degrees  of  Heavens  .  .  .  According  to  degrees 
in  successive  order,  these  appear  one  above  another  ; 
and  according  to  degrees  in  simultaneous  order,  one 
within  another. 

.  As  in  his  first  origin  man  is  such  a  habitation  of 

the  Lord  .  .  .  and  at  that  time  these  three  degrees  are 
opened  .  .  . 

3.  So  many  are  the  degrees  of  life  with  man  ;  but 

with  beasts  there  are  not  the  two  higher  degrees,  but 
only  the  lowest  one  .  .  . 

iv2.  Hereby  are  opened  to  man  the  two  higher 
degrees  of  his  life,  which  have  been  the  habitations  of 
the  Lord  in  his  formation  ;  and  the  lowest  degree,  which 
has  been  inverted  and  bent  backwards,  is  thus  reformed. 

v2.  See  Brain  at  this  ref. 

viii2.  The  reason  why  man  then  comes  into  angelic 
wisdom,  is  that  the  higher  degrees  of  the  life  of  his 
mind  are  opened ;  for  every  man  has  three  degrees  of 
life  :  the  lowest  is  natural,  in  this  is  man  in  the  world  ; 
the  second  degree  is  spiritual,  in  this  is  every  Angel  in 
the  lower  Heavens  ;  the  third  degree  is  celestial,  in 
which  is  every  Angel  in  the  higher  Heavens  ;  and  man 
is  an  Angel  in  proportion  as  the  two  higher  degrees  are 
opened  with  him  by  wisdom  from  the  Lord  and  by  love 
to  Him.  Yet  in  the  world  he  does  not  know  that  these 
degrees  are  opened,  until  he  is  separated  from  the  first 
degree  which  is  natural,  which  is  effected  by  the  death 
of  the  body. 

xii.  42.  Between  natural  and  spiritual  things  there  is 
110  ratio,  yet  there  is  conjunction  through  correspond- 
ences ...  So  are  a  higher  degree  and  a  lower  one  in 
relation  to  each  other. 

52.  These  spiritual  atmospheres  are  augmented  in 
density  through  discrete  degrees. 

Ang.  Idea.  The  first  proceeding  was  continued  down 
to  ultimates  through  discrete  degrees,  exactly  as  an  end 
is  through  causes  into  effects,  or  as  the  thing  producing 
and  the  thing  produced  in  a  continual  series. 

Inv.  14.  The  human  mind  is  of  three  degrees,  which 
are  celestial,  spiritual,  and  natural :  in  the  first  degree 
is  the  soul,  in  the  second  is  the  spirit  or  mind,  in  the 
third  is  the  body.  It  is  the  same  whether  you  say  that 
the  mind  of  man  is  of  three  degrees  or  that  man  him- 
self is  .  .  .  The  celestial  degree,  in  which  is  the  soul  or 
inmost  man,  is  specifically  of  love  ;  the  spiritual  degree, 
in  which  is  the  mind  or  spirit,  which  is  the  middle  man, 
is  specifically  of  wisdom  from  love  ;  the  third  degree, 
in  which  is  the  body,  which  is  the  ultimate  man,  is  the 
containant  of  both  ;  without  the  latter,  the  two  prior 
degrees  do  not  subsist.  Ex. 

Deign.     See  WoRTHY-digm/s. 


Deity- 


Delay 


Deity.     Numen. 

A.  20094.  "When  they  live  in  charity,  and  adore  the 
Deity  the  Creator  of  the  universe  .  .  .     2049. 

465s4.  ('Aristotle's  ideaofa  Supreme  Deity.')   D.3951. 

4950.  They  were  examined  as  to  whether  they  believed 
in  any  .  .  .  Supreme  Deity  .  .  .  They  said  that  they  could 
not  have  an  idea  of  a  living  Deity.     Min.4722. 

8869.  They  suppose  that  if  there  be  anything  of 
Deity  present  it  is  in  the  order  of  nature  .  .  . 

H.  3542.  They  torment  those  who  do  not  worship 
them  as  Deities. 

S.  23.  Their  descendants  .  .  .  began  to  worship  (these 
representative  images)  as  holy  things,  and  at  last  as 
Deities. 

P.  21510.  If  anyone  honours  (this  love)  so  far  as  to  say 
that ...  it  is  the  Deity  of  the  world,  it  loves  him  from 
the  heart. 

298.  From  his  Own  intelligence  he  believes  himself  to 
be  a  Deity. 

I.  1  Is.  The  horrible  fallacy  that  God  has  infused  Him- 
self into  men,  whence  every  man  is  a  sort  of  Deity  that 
lives  of  himself. 

T.  292.  Some  of  these  men  they  first  worshipped  as 
Divinities,  and  at  last  as  gods. 

D.  5213.  (The  Babylonian  Spirits)  worshipped  these 
persons  as  Deities. 

Min.  4745.  It  was  given  to  say  to  (this  African 
Queen)  that  she  knew  there  was  a  Deity  who  was  above 
her,  and  that  this  would  be  to  act  against  the  Deity  and 
His  laws  ;  she  then  was  silent :  she  was  profane,  because 
she  acknowledged  a  Deity,  yet  lived  in  this  way. 

Delay,  Stay.    Morari. 

Tarry.      Commorari. 

Tarrying.     Commoratio. 

A.  2410.  '(Lot)  lingered'  (Gen.xix.  16)  =  resistance 
from  the  nature  of  evil.  Ex. 

2418.  'Stay  not  in  all  the  plain '  =  that  he  should  not 
delay  in  anything  of  them. 

3613.  'Thou  shalt  tarry  with  him  some  days'  (Gen. 
xxvii.43)=what  is  successive;  (for)  'to  tarry'  has  a 
similar  signification  to  'to  dwell ;' thus  it = to  live  ;  but 
'to  tarry'  is  predicated  of  the  life  of  truth  with  good  ; 
and  'to  dwell,'  of  the  life  of  good  with  truth. 

e.  Concerning  this  Successive,  or  the  tarrying  of 

Jacob  with  Laban,  it  treats  in  what  follows. 

4243.  'I  have  sojourned  with  Laban,  and  stayed  until 
now'  (Gen.xxxii.4)=that  he  had  imbued  the  good  sig- 
nified by  'Laban'  ...  'To  stay'  or  'tarry'  is  predicated 
of  the  life  of  truth  with  good  ;  here,  =  to  imbue. 

2.  The  sojourning  and  tarrying  of  Jacob  with 

Laban. 

4540.  'And  tarry  there'  (Gen.xxxv.  1 )  =  life.  'To 
tarry'  or  ' dwell '  =  life. 

5187.  A  certain  Spirit  came  to  me,  inquiring  whether 
I  knew  where  he  might  stay  .  .  . 

7980.  'They  were  driven  out  of  Egypt,  and  could  not 
tarry'  (Ex.xii.39)  =  that  they  were  removed  by  those 


who  were  in  falsity  from  evil.  .  .  'Not   to  be  able  to 
tarry  '  =  the  necessity  of  removal. 

9292.  The  tarrying  of  the  Sons  of  Israel  in  Egypt = 
the  infestation  of  the  spiritual .  .  . 

H.  4942.  (Married  partners  there)  tarry  together  a 
longer  or  shorter  time  .  .  .  But  if  love  truly  conjugial 
.  .  .  has  not  conjoined  them,  after  some  tarrying,  they 
are  separated. 

5132.  Some  (are  carried  to  Heaven)  after  a  short 
tarrying  with  good  Spirits. 

R.  7912.  They  are  not  allowed,  as  before,  to  delay  in 
the  "World  of  Spirits  .  .  . 

8662.  Some  stay  in  the  "World  of  Spirits  a  month  or  a 
year,  and  some  ten  years  and  up  to  thirty  .  .  .  but  at 
this  day,  not  beyond  twenty  years. 

M.  162.  That  which  is  from  the  body  in  the  spirit 
does  not  last  long ;  but  the  love  which  is  from  the 
spirit  in  the  body  does  last. 


E.  7S06.  'The  wolf  shall  tarry  with  the  lamb'  (Is. 
xi.6)  =  .  .  .  'It  will  tarry '  =  a  state  of  j)eace  .  .  . 

Coro.  292.  By  tarrying  and  co-operation  (with  the 
Lord) .  .  . 

Delay.     Remora. 

See  Slow,  and  under  Linger. 

A.  1389.  On  the  removal  of  such  things  as  act  as 
delays  and  hindrances  .  .  . 

Delay.     Remoratio. 

A.  8985s.  Abstract  thought  can  pervade  the  universal 
Heaven  without  delay  anywhere. 

Deliberate.     Deliberare,  Deliberatus. 
Deliberation.     Deliberatio. 

A.  13273.  Not  imputed  to  him  who  has  not  done  it 
with  deliberate  intention. 

3158.  The  free  state  of  their  deliberation.  Sig.  .  .  In 
both  cases  there  is  required  a  free  state  of  deliberation  ; 
in  betrothal  and  marriage  .  .  .  and  also  in  the  initiation 
and  conjunction  of  good  and  truth.   Ex. 

H.  2772.  Little  children  .  .  .  have  nothing  purposed 
and  deliberate,  thus  no  end  of  evil. 

R.  9627.  Then  followed  a  deliberation  about  the 
Holy  Spirit.     T.1887. 

M.  298.  The  womau  ought  to  consult  her  parents  .  .  . 
and  afterwards  deliberate  with  herself,  before  she 
consents.  Gen. art. 


D.  3483.  This  signified  that  they  were  determined  by 
such  a  phantasy. 

4468.  Another  also  deliberated  in  like  manner  from 
herself,  and  was  made  like  a  pendulous  ghost. 

5 161.  On  the  Hell  of  those  who  ...  act  with  delibera- 
tion and  circumspection. 

Delicacy.     See   Dainties,   and   under  De- 
licious. 

Delicacies.     Lautitiae. 
A.  100374.   'They  who  have  eaten  delicacies'  (Lam. 


Delicate 


73 


Delicious 


iv.  5)  =  those  who  have  the  Word,   and  thence  Know- 
ledges of  truth. 

P.  2544.  A  peasant  would  be  oppressed  at  heart  .  .  . 
if  a  table  were  set  before  him  covered  with  delicacies  .  .  . 

T.  394.  Delicacies  for  the  tongue. 

810.  They  select  something  savoury  from  their  Own 
intelligence,  which  they  roll  over  in  their  mouths  as 
delicacies  .  .  .  and  so  teach. 


E.  65210.  'Delicacies'  (Lam. iv. 5)  =  genuine  truths 
from  the  Word. 

Delicate.    Delkatus. 
Delicately.     Delicate. 

A.  944.  Women  who  .  .  .  have  entirely  given  them- 
selves up  to  ...  a  delicate  and  idle  life  .  .  .  (Their  lot.) 

4948.  They  who  have  lived  in  pleasures,  or  in  a 
delicate  life  conjoined  with  interior  cunning,  are  under 
the  heel  of  the  right  foot  .  .  .     D.2773. 

H.  358.  Man  may  eat  and  drink  delicately,  pro- 
vided he  does  not  make  his  life  to  consist  in  it. 

488s.  They  who  have  .  .  .  lived  delicately,  and  in- 
dulged their  appetite,  loving  these  things  as  the  highest 
goods  of  life,  in  the  other  life  love  excrements  and 
privies  .  .  . 

M.  2947.  Clusters  .  .  .  some  of  which  were  of  a  delicate 
flavour  ...     M.8. 


D.  592.  On  the  punishment  of  women  especially,  who 
lead  a  delicate  and  idle  life. 

1746.  Such  are  they  who  care  too  much  about  the 
cuticle  .  .  .  who  are  otherwise  called  the  delicate  .  .  . 

4458.  Their  Subject  could  put  forth  an  idea  of  herself 
...  as  of  a  Queen  .  .  .  leaning  on  the  arm  of  a  throne, 
as  delicate  females  are  wont  to  do. 

E.  11212.   'Hear  this,  delicate  one'  (Is.xlvii.8). 

Delicious.      Delitiostis. 
Deliciousness.     Delitiae,  Delitium. 
Deliciate,  To.    Delitiari. 
Deliciation.    Delltiatio. 

A.  42e.  'Delicates'  (Jer.li.34)  =  the  Knowledges  of 
faith. 

85s.  'Then  shalt  thou  be  delicious  to  Jehovah '  (Is. 
lviii.  14). 

54.  The  highest  happinesses  and  deliciousnesses  of 
the  Most  Ancient  Church  were  marriages. 

3532.  'That  your  soul  be  deliciated  in  fatness' 
(Is.lv.  2). 

.   'The  river  of  deliciousnesses'  (Ps.xxxvi.8)  =  the 

spiritual  which  is  of  faith  thence. 

S452.  This  (heavenly)  joy  and  deliciousness  came  as 
it  were  from  the  heart ...  as  if  the  fibre  were  nothing  but 
joy  and  deliciousness.     H.4132. 

949.  They  call  darkness  there  deliciousnesses. 
1 123.  See  DELiGHT-jucundum,  at  this  ref. 
1484.  The  truth  which  there  is   in  knowledges,  the 
deliciousnesses   of  which  the   Lord  took  during  His 


childhood.  Sig.     The  deliciousnesses  of  truth  are  those 
which  come  from  intellectual  truth. 

1869.  Things  still  more  beautiful  and  delicious  would 
be  presented  .  .  . 

2296.  The  deliciousnesses  (of  little  children  there). 
Des.     H.3376. 

3520.  See  Dainties  at  these  refs.  S.96b. 

522ie.  To  think  such  things  is  deliciousnesses  to 
them. 

6410.  'He  shall  give  the  deliciousnesses  of  a  king' 
(Gen. xlix.  20)  =  pleasantness  from  truth.  '  Delicious- 
nesses' =  what  is  pleasant.     E.4384. 

8593*.  Agag  went  to  Samuel  'in  delicacies'  (1  Sam. 
xv.  32).  '  To  go  in  delicacies ' = external  blandishments, 
which  are  characteristic  of  such  in  the  presence  of 
others. 

885 ie.  Their  deliciousnesses  (in  Jupiter)  are  to  love 
their  married  partners,  and  to  have  the  care  of  children  ; 
all  other  deliciousnesses  they  do  indeed  call  delicious- 
nesses, but  comparatively  external  ones. 

99606.   'Sons  of  deliciousnesses'   (Mic.i.  16) = Divine 

truths. 

W.  47.  The  essence  of  all  love  consists  in  conjunction, 
yea,  its  life,  which  is  called  delight,  pleasantness,  de- 
liciousness, sweetness,  bliss,  joyousness,  and  happiness. 

P.  39e.  Make  the  Angel  to  be  as  it  Avere  wholly  a 
deliciousness. 

R.  474.  'Sons  of  delights'  =  the  genuine  truths  of  the 
Church  from  the  Word. 

759.  'The  powers  of  her  delicacies  by  which  they 
were  made  rich'  (E.ev.xviii.3)  =  the  dogmas  by  means  of 
which  they  procure  dominion  over  the  souls  of  men,  and 
thus  also  over  their  possessions  and  wealth. 

763.  'As  much  as  she  hath  lived  deliciously'  (ver.7) 
=  in  the  degree  of  their  exultation  of  mind  and  body  on 
account  of  riches,  and  the  deligkts-jiicimditatibus-a,nd 
pleasures  therefrom. 

767.  'To  be  deliciated'  (ver.9)  =  to  enjoy  the  delights 
of  dominion,  and  at  the  same  time  of  wealth. 

M.  Title.  The  Deliciousnesses  of  Wisdom  concerning 
Marriage  Love. 

84.  Heavenly  joy  ...  is  not  external  paradisiacal  de- 
liciousnesses, unless  together  with  them  there  are 
internal  paradisiacal  deliciousnesses ;  external  para- 
disiacal deliciousnesses  are  only  deliciousnesses  of  the 
senses  of  the  body  ;  but  internal  paradisiacal  delicious- 
nesses  are  deliciousnesses  of  the  affections  of  the  soul . .  . 
Without  its  corresponding  soul,  all  deliciousness  by  con- 
tinuance languishes  .  .  . 

5.  They  then  asked,  What  is  the  deliciousness  ot 

the  soul,  and  what  is  the  source  of  it  ?  The  Angel 
replied,  The  deliciousness  of  the  soul  is  from  love  and 
wisdom  from  the  Lord  .  .  .  This  deliciousness  from  the 
Lord  inflows  into  the  soul,  and  descends  .  .  .  into  all  the 
senses  of  the  body,  and  fulfils  itself  in  them  :  thus  joy 
becomes  joy  .  .  . 

183.  They  then  enumerated  the  heavenly  delicious- 
nesses proceeding  from  the  love  of  use,  and  said  that 
they  are  myriads  of  myriads,  and  that  those  enter  into 
them  who  are  in  Heaven. 


Delicious 


74 


Delicious 


[M.]  445.  (The  chaste  love  of  the  sex)  is  the  de- 
liciousness  itself  of  the  mind  and  thence  of  the  heart,  and 
not  at  the  same  time  of  the  flesh  beneath  the  heart .  .  . 
Within  and  above  the  enclosure  of  the  heart,  the  morality 
of  a  young  man  is  deliciated  with  the  beauty  of  a  maiden 
■with  the  deliciousnesses  of  the  chaste  love  of  the  sex  .  .  . 

9.  They  asked  whether  offspring  are  born  there 

from  the  ultimate  deliciousnesses  of  that  love,  and  if 
not,  what  is  the  use  of  them.  The  Angelic  Spirits 
replied  ...  By  means  of  these  ultimate  deliciousnesses, 
two  married  partners  are  united  more  in  the  marriage  of 
good  and  truth  .  .  .  Hence  it  is,  that  after  the  delicious- 
nesses, the  Angels  do  not  become  sad  . . .  but  cheerful .  . . 

68.  In  marriage  love  there  are  brought  together  all 
joys  and  all  deliciousnesses  from  primes  to  ultimates. 
Gen.  art. 

69.  The  Angels  said,  that  the  inmost  deliciousnesses 
of  this  love,  which  are  of  the  soul  .  .  .  are  imperceptible, 
because  they  are  those  of  peace  and  innocence  ;  but  that 
in  their  descent  they  become  more  and  more  perceptible 
.  .  .  and  at  last  they  unite  themselves  in  ultimates  in 
the  deliciousness  of  deliciousnesses.  .  .  They  added, 
that  the  varieties  of  these  deliciousnesses  in  the  souls 
of  married  partners,  and  from  these  in  their  minds,  and 
from  these  in  their  bosoms,  are  infinite  and  eternal ;  and 
that  they  are  exalted  according  to  the  wisdom  with 
the  husbands. 

7 13.  Genii .  .  .  approaching  an  Angel  who  was  being 
deliciated  with  his  consort  .  .  . 

757.  The  deliciousnesses  of  marriage  love  as  to  abund- 
ance, degree,  and  virtue,  are  excellent  and  eminent 
according  to  the  worship  of  the  Lord  Jehovih  with 

us  .  .  . 

1376.  "With  men,  there  is  a  perpetual  influx  of  vernal 
heat  from  the  Lord,  wherefore  they  are  able  to  be 
deliciated  in  marriage  at  all  times,  even  in  the  middle 
of  winter. 

144.  All  the  deliciousnesses  of  love  truly  conjugial, 
even  the  ultimate  ones,  are  chaste.  Gen.  art. 

.   The  deliciousnesses  of  this  love   ascend  and 

enter  Heaven,  and  on  the  way  pass  through  the  delights 
of  the  heavenly  loves  in  which  are  the  Angels ;  they 
also  conjoin  themselves  with  the  deliciousnesses  of  the 
marriage  love  of  the  Angels.  .  .  Moreover  .  .  .  the 
Angels  perceive  these  deliciousnesses  with  themselves 
to  be  exalted  and  infilled,  when  they  ascend  from  chaste 
marriages  on  earth  ;  and  ...  on  the  question  being  put, 
whether  [this  is  also  the  case]  as  to  ultimate  delicious- 
nesses, they  assented,  and  said  silently,  How  could  it 
be  otherwise  ?  Are  not  these  the  deliciousnesses  of  love 
truly  conjugial  in  their  fulness  ? 

1482.  The  internal .  .  .  can  only  be  deliciated  chastely, 
and  it  imparts  the  same  disposition  to  its  external, 
wherein  it  is  made  sensible  of  its  own  deliciousnesses. 

155a.  It  was  the  affection  of  the  deliciousnesses  of 
marriage  love  which  was  sung  by  the  wives  in  Heaven  .  .  . 

2.  With  the  husbands  (in  the  Hall  of  the  Golden 

Shower)  there  resides  wisdom  concerning  marriage  love, 
and  with  the  wives  wisdom  concerning  its  delicious- 
nesses. I  perceive  that  you  are  in  meditation  concern- 
ing the  deliciousnesses  of  marriage  love,  wherefore  I 


will  introduce  you  ...  I  said  to  the  wives,  Pray  tell  me 
something  about  the  deliciousnesses  of  marriage  love 
.  .  .  They  inquired,  Who  taught  you  to  interrogate  us 
about  the  deliciousnesses  of  marriage  love  ?  I  replied, 
This  Angel  told  me  .  .  .  that  wives  are  their  receptacles 
and  sensories,  because  they  are  born  loves,  and  all 
deliciousnesses  are  of  love  .  .  . 

4.  We  have  a  sixth  sense,  which  is  a  sense  of  all 

the  deliciousnesses  of  the  marriage  love  of  the 
husband.  Des. 

183.  The  name  of  this  garden  is  Adramandoni,  which 
is  the  deliciousness  of  marriage  love. 

6.  Whence  are  the  deliciousnesses  of  marriage  love, 

which  are  innumerable  and  ineffable  ?  The  Angels  re- 
plied, that  they  are  from  the  uses  of  love  and  wisdom, 
(for)  in  proportion  as  anyone  loves  to  be  wise  for  the 
sake  of  genuine  use,  he  is  in  the  vein  and  potency  of 
marriage  love,  and  in  proportion  as  he  is  in  these  two, 
he  is  in  the  deliciousnesses.  Use  effects  this  ;  because 
love  through  and  together  with  wisdom  are  deliciated. 
.  .  .  These  things  take  place  between  love  and  wisdom 
inwardly  in  use  ;  but  in  their  beginnings  these  delicious- 
nesses are  imperceptible,  yet  become  more  and  more 
perceptible  as  they  descend  through  degrees  and  enter 
the  body  .  .  .  These  heavenly  nuptial  sports  are  not  at 
all  perceived  by  man  in  his  sold,  but  they  thence  in- 
sinuate themselves  into  the  interiors  of  the  mind  under 
the  appearance  of  peace  and  innocence,  and  into  the 
exteriors  of  the  mind  under  the  appearance  of  bliss, 
joyousness,  and  delight ;  but  into  the  bosom  under  the 
appearance  of  the  inmost  deliciousnesses  of  friendship  ; 
and  into  the  genital  region  ...  as  the  deliciousness  of 
deliciousnesses.  In  proceeding  towards  the  bosom  .  .  . 
they  become  permanent,  and  there  present  themselves 
sensible  under  an  infinite  variety  of  deliciousnesses  ; 
and  on  account  of  the  wonderful  communication  of  the 
bosom  with  the  genital  region,  the  deliciousnesses  there 
become  the  deliciousnesses  of  marriage  love,  which  are 
exalted  above  all  other  deliciousnesses  in  Heaven  and 
the  world,  because  the  use  of  marriage  love  is  the  most 
excellent  of  all  uses  .  .  . 

8.  They  who  are  not  in  the  love  of  being  wise  from 

the  Lord  for  the  sake  of  use,  do  not  know  anything 
about  the  innumerable  deliciousnesses  which  belong  to 
love  truly  conjugial  .  .  .  hence  the  heavenly  nuptial 
sports  of  love  and  wisdom  in  the  soul  .  .  .  cease,  and 
together  with  them  marriage  love  with  its  vein,  potency, 
and  deliciousnesses. 

188.  The  woman  feels  the  deliciousnesses  of  her  heat 
in  the  man's  light.  Gen.  art. 

189.  This  means  that  the  woman  feels  the  delicious- 
nesses of  her  love  in  the  man's  wisdom,  because  this  is 
the  receptacle  ;  and  wherever  love  finds  this  correspond- 
ing, it  is  in  its  own  delights  and  deliciousnesses :  but 
it  is  not  meant,  that  heat  with  its  light  is  deliciated 
outside  of  forms,  but  within  them. 

e.  The  deliciation  of  spiritual  heat  with  spiritual 

light  is  still  more  vividly  perceptible  in  human  forms  .  .  . 

198.  This  formation  is  effected  by  the  reception  of  the 
propagations  of  the  husband's  soul,  with  the  delicious- 
ness arising  from  the  fact,  that  she  wants  to  be  the 
love   of   her  husband's  wisdom.    Gen. art.  .  .  Marriage 


Delicious 


75 


Delicious 


deliciousnesses  with  wives  arise  solely  from  their  will  to 
be  one  with  their  husbands,  as  good  is  one  with  truth  in 
the  spiritual  marriage. 

2083.  (The  wives  said),  "We  are  deliciated  from  (our 
husbands'  love),  and  we  love  nothing  more  than  that 
they  should  be  deliciated  from  our  deliciousnesses, 
which  grow  dull  with  us  if  they  become  cheap  with  them. 

21 12.  The  spiritual  deliciousnesses  conjoined  with  the 
natural  deliciousnesses,  which  are  the  portion  of  those 
who  are  in  love  truly  conjugial,  constitute  amiability, 
and  thence  the  capacity  of  being  wise. 

267e.  See  Delirium  at  this  ref. 

293.  (The  seven  wives  in  the  Garden  of  Koses)  said, 
We  are  conversing  here  about  the  deliciousnesses  of 
marriage  love,  and  from  much  confirmation  we  conclude, 
that  these  deliciousnesses  are  also  the  deliciousnesses 
of  wisdom.  .  .  I  asked  them,  How  do  you  wives  know 
that  the  deliciousnesses  of  marriage  love  are  the  same 
as  the  deliciousnesses  of  wisdom  ?  They  replied,  We 
know  this  from  the  correspondence  of  wisdom  in  husbands 
with  the  deliciousnesses  of  marriage  love  in  us  ;  for 
the  deliciousnesses  of  marriage  love  in  us  exalt  and 
diminish  themselves,  and  entirely  qualify  themselves, 
according  to  the  wisdom  in  our  husbands. 

3.  Hence  we  know  what  wisdom  of  theirs  is  de- 
liciated in  us  .  .  .  The  pleasantnesses  of  this  wisdom 
are  transcribed  into  the  deliciousnesses  in  our  bosoms, 
and  from  our  bosoms  into  theirs,  and  thus  return  to 
wisdom  their  origin. 

4.  I  then  asked,  Do  you  know  any  more  about  the 

wisdom  of  your  husbands  deliciating  in  you  ?  They 
said,  We  do  ...  In  proportion  (as  the  wife  alone  is 
loved)  we  feel  more  distinctly  and  exquisitely  the 
deliciousnesses  in  us  which  correspond  to  the  delights 
of  the  affections  and  the  pleasantnesses  of  the  thoughts 
of  our  husbands. 

5.  I  asked  whether  they  knew  how  the  com- 
munication is  effected.  They  said,  In  all  conjunction  by 
love  there  must  be  action,  reception,  and  reaction ;  the 
delicious  state  of  our  love  is  acting  or  action,  the  state 
of  wisdom  of  the  husbands  is  receiving  or  reception,  and 
is  also  reacting  or  reaction  according  to  the  perception, 
and  this  reaction  is  perceived  by  us  with  deliciousnesses 
in  the  bosom  according  to  the  state  .  .  .  Take  care  that 
by  the  deliciousnesses  we  have  mentioned  you  do  not 
understand  the  ultimate  deliciousnesses  of  that  love : 
of  these  we  never  speak,  but  of  our  bosom  delicious- 
nesses, of  which  there  is  a  perpetual  correspondence  with 
the  state  of  wisdom  of  our  husbands. 

6.  I  read  these  words  (on  a  paper  brought  by  a 

little  boy),  Tell  the  inhabitants  of  your  earth,  that  there 
exists  a  love  truly  conjugial,  the  deliciousnesses  of  which 
are  myriads,  hardly  any  of  which  are  yet  known  to  the 
world  ;  but  they  will  be  known,  when  the  Church 
betroths  herself  to  her  Lord,  and  is  married. 

.  Then  one  of  the  seven  wove  a  garland  of  roses, 

and  sprinkled  it  with  the  water  of  the  fountain,  and 
placed  it  on  the  boy's  cap  .  .  .  and  said,  Receive  the 
deliciousnesses  of  intelligence ;  know  that  a  cap  sig- 
nifies intelligence,  and  a  garland  from  this  rose  garden 
the  deliciousnesses. 

294.  (The  seven  wives  said),  Such  scenery  is  created 


in  a  moment  by  the  Lord  .  .  .  and  we  divine  that  it 
represents  the  deliciousnesses  of  marriage  love. 

3.  On  hearing  this,  I  said  ...  I  told  some  wives 

in  our  country  ...  I  know  that  you  have  bosom  de- 
liciousnesses originating  from  your  marriage  love  .  .  . 
and  you  therefore  study  to  bend  and  lead  the  disposi- 
tions of  your  husbands  to  wisdom,  in  order  that  you 
may  secure  these  deliciousnesses. 

4.  The  wife  of  such  a  man  has  no  bosom  delicious- 
nesses .  .  .  but  only  pleasures  .  .  . 

7.  (Their  husbands  said),  You  have  been  convers- 
ing with  this  man  about  love  truly  conjugial,  that  its 
deliciousnesses  are  the  deliciousnesses  of  wisdom ; 
and  also  about  scortatory  love,  that  its  deliciousnesses 
are  the  pleasures  of  insanity  .  .  .  They  added,  that  in 
externals  the  pleasures  of  insanity  appear  like  the 
deliciousnesses  of  wisdom,  but  not  in  internals  .  .  . 

8.  I  read  these  words  (from  another  paper  brought 

by  the  little  boy),  The  deliciousnesses  of  marriage  love 
ascend  to  the  highest  Heaven,  and  both  on  the  way 
thither  and  also  there  conjoin  themselves  with  the 
deliciousnesses  of  all  heavenly  loves,  and  thus  enter 
into  their  happiness,  which  endures  to  eternity  :  the 
reason  is,  that  the  deliciousnesses  of  this  love  are  also 
the  deliciousnesses  of  wisdom. 

3552.  The  husbands  (in  Heaven)  have  a  perpetual 
capacity  of  deliciating. 

441.  In  the  same  degree  it  perceives  the  delights  of 
marriage  love  as  harmless  and  chaste,  and  at  last  as 
delicious  and  blessed. 


D.  29.  (Index  ;  under  Jucunditas).  By  evil  Spirits 
.  .  .  deliciousnesses  can  be  produced,  as  are  the  delicious- 
nesses of  a  king,  or  Asher. 

307,  He  cried  out  that  he  perceived  continual  varieties 
of  deliciousnesses  .  .  . 

.  Again  they  cried  out,  saying  that  there  were 

innumerable  varieties  of  deliciousnesses. 

370.  Besides  health,  there  is  also  a  peace  of  the 
whole  body,  delicious  and  perceptible  .  .  . 

379.  (This  deceitful  heavenly  joy)  is  effected  by  the 
transference  of  one's  own  joy  or  deliciousness  into 
another,  from  whatever  cause  that  deliciousness  may 
come  forth  .  .  .  Thence  I  had  a  certain  deliciousness 
which  took  possession  of  the  universal  body  ...  I  was 
completely  dissolved  in  delicious  allurements  .  .  .  The 
causes  of  the  deliciousnesses  were  not  felt  in  me,  that 
they  were  from  some  cruelty  that  was  being  carried  on, 
or  that  they  were  from  deceit ;  but  they  were  delicious- 
nesses in  which  such  things  were  not  felt  .  .  . 

2.  Besides  these  external  corporeal  deliciousnesses, 

there  were  also  interior  ones  infused,  by  other  Spirits, 
who  wanted  to  make  deliciousnesses  for  me,  on  account 
of  a  certain  veneration.  I  was  not  able  to  recognize  who 
these  other  Spirits  were,  nor  to  explore  the  source  of  the 
deliciousnesses  ;  yet  for  some  time  I  lay  in  the  sweet- 
ness of  concurrent  deliciousnesses  ...  As  I  perceived 
no  deceit,  I  supposed  that  this  was  indeed  a  heavenly 
deliciousness,  but  that  it  was  external ;  thus  flowing 
from  external  causes,  and  therefore  not  permanent ;  and 
hence  I  wanted  to  remove  myself  from  it  .  .  .  As  to  this 
body  of  deliciousnesses,  I  have  heard  that  it  is  filthy, 
although  I  could  not  feel  it  to  be  so. 


Delicious 


76 


Delicious 


[D.  379]e.  There  exists  a  more  interior  or  heavenly 
deliciousness. 

399.  The  worst  of  Spirits  .  .  .  induced  on  me  a  delicate 
sensation,  -which  emulated  the  sensation  of  heavenly 
deliciousnesses,  and  also  the  sensation  of  marriage  de- 
liciousness, so  that  hardly  any  difference  could  be 
discerned  ;  but  on  being  warned,  I  learned  that  all  these 
things  were  fictitious  and  counterfeit.  .  .  Thus  man  can 
never  discern  between  diabolical  and  heavenly  things, 
except  from  God  Messiah  .  .  . 

403.  A  new  method  of  making  deliciousnesses  for 
Mohammed. 

407.  They  who  take  thence  a  delicious  sensation  .  .  . 

428.  There  are  very  many  varieties  of  heavenly  de- 
lights and  deliciousnesses,  in  which  there  is  happiness. 
Gen.  art.  Those  things  are  called  heavenly  delights- 
j ucunditates-Vihich.  come  forth  sensitively  with  Souls. 
.  .  .  But  deliciousnesses  are  those  thing.;  which  come 
from  a  more  interior  fountain.  In  delights  there  is  a 
species  of  happiness  ;  in  deliciousnesses  there  is  a  species 
of  heavenly  marriage  joy  .  .  .  True  delights  and  true 
deliciousnesses  have  happiness  in  themselves  .  .  .  thus 
true  delights  and  deliciousnesses  come  solely  from 
God  Messiah  as  their  Fount. 

438.  From  the  still  remaining  phantasy  or  imagina- 
tion, heavenly  pleasantnesses  and  deliciousnesses  seemed 
to  them  to  be  formed,  in  which  heavenly  peace  reigns. 
Ex. 

465.  On  first  awaking,  I  again  perceived,  as  often 
before,  a  state  of  quiet  from  peace,  namely,  a  delicious 
delight ;  but  it  was  not  peace. 

491.  Hence  there  is  such  delicious  music  and  singing 
with  the  celestials,  when  the  thoughts  of  man  agree 
with  their  ideas  .  .  . 

592.  Thus  they  sit  in  deliciousnessses  ...  as  Queens. 

755.  On  the  difference  between  the  deliciousnesses  of 
pleasure,  and  true  happiness. 

.  When  I  was  feeling  deliciousnesses  or  pleasant- 
nesses, I  knew  not  whence  they  were,  because  it  is  most 
difficult  for  a  Soul  or  Spirit  to  distinguish  between 
fictitious  or  counterfeit  deliciousnesses,  and  true  or 
heavenly  ones  ;  because  as  yet  the  sensation  is  so  gross. 
.  .  .  "Wherefore,  there  was  a  discourse  with  the  Spirits 
around  me  about  these  deliciousnesses,  and  their  source: 
it  was  stated  that  false  deliciousnesses  or  pleasures 
sometimes  so  counterfeit  true  and  heavenly  ones,  that 
they  cannot  be  distinguished  from  them  ;  nay,  that 
unless  the  Lord  inspired  a  Knowledge  of  the  distinction, 
a  Spirit  could  by  no  means  know  it.  By  means  of  the 
like  fictitious  deliciousnesses,  the  worst  evil  Spirits  for 
the  most  part  delude  and  fascinate  those  who  are  in  the 
other  life  ;  for  they  suppose  that  it  is  what  is  heavenly 
itself,  whereas  it  is  utterly  infernal  .  .  .     756. 

904.  See  Sing  at  these  refs.     2108. 

1488.  There  are  some  who  are  so  delighted  with  re- 
venge .  .  .  that  nothing  is  more  delicious  .  .  .  nay,  they 
call  this  deliciousnesses,  so  that  they  scarcely  want  to 
express  it  by  any  other  name. 

2079J.  They  insinuate  themselves  into  the  pleasures 
or  deliciousnesses  of  others. 


2160.  On  the  deliciousnesses  of  the  good  Spirits  and 
Angels  of  the  interior  Heaven. 

.  Besides  the  interior,  more  interior,  and  inmost 

deliciousnesses,  they  have  also  sensuous  deliciousnesses 
indefinite  in  number.  Des. 

2585.  (Index).  That  the  states  of  deliciousnesses  and 
delights  in  the  other  life  are  indefinite,  inexpressible, 
and  utterly  unknown  to  man. 

261 1.  On  the  interior  deliciousnesses  of  some  Spirits 
who  are  content  with  a  few  things. 

3097.  On  paradisiacal  deliciousnesses. 

3100.  On  a  place  where  there  are  corporeal  delicious- 
nesses. 

3137.  So  that  they  live  in  deliciousnesses  together. 

3381.  The  things  they  introduced  were  so  delicious  .  .  . 

4365.  There  seemed  to  be  reclining  at  a  table  with 
deliciousnesses  those  whom  his  poisonous  talk  deliciated ; 
when  suddenly  the  table  was  thrown  in  their  faces,  and 
in  place  of  the  deliciousnesses,  serpent-slaver  flowed 
into  their  faces  from  his  talk. 

E.  48310.  'The  river  of  deliciousnesses' = truth  from 
that  good. 

555s.  'Houses  of  deliciousnesses'  (Midi. 9)  =  the 
pleasant  and  happy  things  of  Heaven  ;  for  these  are  the 
affections  of  good  and  truth. 

61710.  'To  be- deliciated  in  fatness '  =  to  be  delighted 
from  good. 

622s.  'Delicates'  (Jer.  11.34)= the  Knowledges  of  truth 
and  good  from  the  "Word. 

72412.  These  are  called  'sons  of  deliciousnesses'  from 
their  love  and  thence  delights. 

992e.  (The  Angels)  say  that  the  deliciousnesses  of  the 
effects  (of  their  marriage  love)  cannot  be  described  by 
the  words  of  any  language  in  the  natural  world,  nor  be 
thought  with  any  ideas  except  spiritual  ones. 

102914.  'Dragons  in  the  palaces^ of  deliciousnesses' 
(Is.xiii.22)  =  these  things  falsified  in  their  doctrines. 

1 104.  '  The  po\xers-facultates-of  her  delicacies'  =  those 
things  of  the  Church  which  are  called  Knowledges  and 
are  said  to  be  holy,  yet  which  derive  everything  from 
the  love  of  dominating  both  Heaven  and  the  world  .  .  . 
These  powers  are  called  'the  powers  of  her  delicacies' 
because  they  are  delights. 

1 1 18.   'To  be  deliciated'  — to  take  pleasure. 
1 1 30.   'To  be  deliciated '= delight  from  domination 
.  .  .  thus  to  love  evils.     'To  commit  whoredom'  is  pre- 
dicated of  falsities  ;  'to  be  deliciated,'  of  evils  ;  both,  of 
their  delights. 

11592.  'To  be  deliciated  in  fatness'  =  to  be  in  joyous- 
ness  and  bliss. 

.   '  The  river  of  deliciousnesses '  =  intelligence  and 

thence  happiness. 

C.  191.  The  single  fibres,  and  single  tissues  of  fibres, 
the  single  capillary  vessels,  and  so  all  the  viscera  in 
general,  derive  their  own  deliciousnesses  ;  which  a  man 
then  perceives  not  singly  but  universally  as  one  general 
sensation.  But  just  as  is  the  mind  of  the  head  within 
them,  such  are  the  deliciousnesses ;   pure  or  impure, 


Delight-De/eda/ 


D  e\igh.t-De/ecfa) 


spiritual  or  natural,  heavenly  or  infernal.  For  within, 
in  every  sensation  of  the  body,  is  the  love  of  the  will 
with  its  affections  ;  and  the  understanding  makes  him 
perceive  their  deliciousnesses. 

De  Conj.  i.  "When  marriage  love  was  being  thus  re- 
presented, I  have  heard  the  Angels  say,  that  they  were 
rilled  with  such  deliciousness,  that  they  could  no  other- 
wise express  it,  than  by  saying  that  it  was  the  delicious- 
ness itself  from  which  as  from  their  origin  arise  all  other 
deliciousnesses  ;  and  this  deliciousness  was  said  to  be 
the  pure  deliciousness  of  the  mind,  without  any  excita- 
tion of  desire.     2. 

Delight.     Deledare,  Delectatio. 
Delightful.     Deledabilis. 

A.  54.  They  were  delighted  solely  with  internal 
things  .  .  . 

954.  (With  killing  and  torturing  their  companions) 
they  are  so  delighted,  that  such  things  are  their  highest 
delights-jucunditates.  They  who  have  been  blood- 
thirsty, are  delighted  to  torture  spirits  ...  At  the  sight 
of  blood  .  .  .  they  are  intensely  delighted.  .  .  They  who 
have  been  delighted  with  mere  pleasures  .  .  .  are  in  the 
highest  degree  delighted  to  stay  in  privies,  etc. 

1629.  (Good  Spirits  behold  these  objects)  always  with 
interior  delight. 

16802.  He  who  when  able  actually  does  evil,  and  is 
delighted  in  it,  is  among  the  infernals. 

17  73.  Spirits  who  in  the  bodily  life  had  been  delighted 
with  the  Word  of  the  Lord  with  delight-picunditate,  in 
the  other  life  have  a  certain  delightful  heavenly  heat 
.  .  .  The  heat  of  those  who  had  been  somewhat  delighted, 
when  communicated  to  me,  was  like  a  vernal  warmth 
.  .  .  The  heat  of  those  who  had  been  still  more  affected 
with  the  delight  of  the  Lord's  Word  .  .  .  was  interior. 
The  heat  of  those  who  had  been  still  more  affected  and 
delighted,  was  still  more  interiorly  delightful .  .  . 

3.  The  heat  of  those  who  indeed  had  been  delighted 

with  the  Word,  but  had  not  been  solicitous  about  the 
understanding  of  it,  was  only  in  the  right  arm. 

18803.  This  delight  lasted  some  months,  but  now  that 
it  has  become  familiar,  they  wonder  at  it  no  longer. 

19503.  The  general  delight,  or  regnant  affection  (of 
truth  separated  from  good)  is  to  conquer. 

22032.  In  the  appearances  themselves  there  is  delight ; 
wherefore,  if  the  Rational  is  deprived  of  appearances,  it 
supposes  that  there  is  nothing  more  of  delight ...  It  is 
admissible  for  it  to  have  delight  in  them. 

2295e.  Little  children  in  the  other  life  ...  are  most 
highly  delighted  with  (little  children  on  earth). 

2593.  When  I  read  to  them  something  from  the  Word, 
they  were  in  the  highest  degree  delighted ;  it  was 
granted  to  perceive  their  very  delight  and  delight- 
jucunditatem  .  .  .     H.3222. 

3536.  Delightful  things,  but  not  desirable  ones.  Sig. 

3589.  Desirable  and  delightful  things  for  the  Divine 
Rational.  Sig.  .  .  .  The  delights-yucwicfa-which  are  of 
good  are  desirable,  and  the  pleasant  things  which  are  of 
truth  are  delightful ;  for  the  affection  of  good  is  that 


which  desires,  and  then  the  affection  of  truth  is  that 
which  delights. 

36902.  It  is  the  heavenly  pleasantness  of  the  Angels 
which  flows  in  and  causes  the  delight  of  little  children 
(in  the  Word). 

e.  Thus  does  he  see  those  things  with  which  he 

had  before  been  delighted,  further  and  further  removed 
from  him. 

39 1 35.  This  good  then  manifests  itself  by  affection, 
namely,  by  this,  that  the  man  is  affected  with  truth,  or 
begins  to  be  delighted  with  it  .  .  . 

402  72.  It  is  otherwise  with  those  who  are  in  the 
affection  of  charity ;  these  are  delighted  with  such 
arcana  .  .  . 

6812.  Spirits  especially  retain  those  things  with  which 
they  are  delighted  ...  for  the  things  which  are  of 
delectation  and  love  .  .  .  remain  .  .  . 

7392s.  Nothing  delights  the  infernals  except  to  do 
what  is  evil  .  .  . 

8725.  The  truths  with  which  good  can  be  conjoined 
.  .  .  are  such  as  delight  the  intellectual  sight,  thus 
which  enter  into  the  affection  .  .  . 

9i52e.  The  Angels  are  delighted  with  such  a  man  .  .  . 

99933.  It  would  be  quite  otherwise,  if  the  mind  were 
delighted  with  heavenly  things  more  than  worldly  ones, 
for  those  things  with  which  man  is  delighted  are 
apprehended.  Exanip. 

H.  562.  Hence  it  is  said  that  variety  delights,  and  it 
is  known  that  the  delight  is  according  to  its  quality. 

265e.  These  things  can  be  comprehended,  provided 
the  mind  is  delighted  with  them ;  for  delight  is 
attended  with  light,  because  it  is  from  love  .  .  . 

334.  Into  the  affections  (of  little  children  there)  are 
first  insinuated  such  things  as  .  .  .  are  delightful. 

347.  For  the  sake  of  the  truth  itself,  with  which  they 
are  inmostly  affected  and  delighted. 

.  As  this  light  enters,  it  also  affects  and  delights  ; 

for  whatever  flows  in  and  is  received  from  Heaven,  is 
attended  with  delight-jucundum-Sind  pleasantness. 

363%  With  dirt  they  are  then  delighted,  in  like 
manner  as  they  had  been  in  the  world  with  riches  for 
the  sake  of  evil  uses.  Ex. 

41 12.  The  Angels  are  not  delighted  with  the  external 
things  themselves,  but  with  the  things  they  represent. 

424.  He  who  wills  good  to  himself  only,  is  delighted 
with  the  evils  which  take  place  with  others. 

429s.  Evil  Spirits  are  eager  (for  these  stenches),  because 
they  are  for  delight ;  for  as  everyone  in  the  world  has 
been  delighted  with  his  own  evil,  so  after  death  he  is 
delighted  with  the  stench  to  which  his  evil  corresponds. 

4502.  The  highest  delight  (of  the  Angels)  consists  in 
this. 

N.  265s.  They  who  have  been  delighted  with  the 
Word,  in  the  other  life  receive  the  heat  of  Heaven,  in 
which  is  celestial  love,  according  to  the  quality  and 
quantity  of  their  delight  from  love.     W.  H.  1 73. 

W.  331.  Uses  for  the  support  of  the  body,  relate  to 
its  delectation,  etc.  Ex. 


~Deligh.t-.De/ectare 


78 


Delight-Jucunditm 


[W.]  333.  Applying  nutrition  to  the  goods  of  love, 
clothing  to  the  truths  of  wisdom,  habitation  to  Heaven, 
recreation  and  delectation  to  happiness  of  life  and 
heavenly  joy  .  .  . 

334.  In  proportion  as  (the  Angels)  are  rational 
spiritual,  the  delectation,  protection,  and  preservation 
of  the  state  are  theirs. 

T.  238.  This  delight  of  the  Angels  (in  the  Word)  is 
communicated  to  the  man,  and  effects  consociation,  and 
also  a  communication  of  perceptions. 


D.  180.  The  phantasies  of  evil  Spirits  are  direful  and 
cruel,  delighting  themselves  in  cruelly  treating  men. 

181.  They  who  are  delighted  with  mensurations. 

268.  The  delectation  of  speaking  with  man  after 
death  is  nothing  .  .  .  But  heavenly  joy  is  ineffable,  and 
in  comparison  with  it  all  earthly  and  worldly  delecta- 
tions are  nothing. 

276.  On  a  certain  species  of  abode  where  they  are 
delighted  by  this,  that  they  are  continually  led  about. 

.  They  take  thence  their  sole  delight. 

377.  "With  these  (cruelties)  they  are  so  delighted, 
that  they  are  their  highest  delights. 

391.  The  greater  the  torment,  the  greater  is  their 
delight,  which  is  so  great  with  them,  that  they  say  it 
surpasses  all  delights-delectamenta. 

403e.  They  .  .  .  induced  a  kind  of  washing  from  head 
to  foot,  with  delight. 

710J.  Some  are  delighted  even  to  their  inmosts,  by 
manifold  pleasantnesses,  as  paradisiacal  ones  .  .  . 

1488.  On  the  punishment  of  those  who  are  delighted 
with  revenge. 

1963.  The  harmony  is  from  the  custom  of  the  life,  by 
virtue  of  which  they  have  taken  delight. 

1964.  They  have  acquired  a  harmony  in  contrary 
things,  as  in  contradicting,  in  plotting  against  marriage 
love  .  .  .  and,  in  fact,  with  such  delight,  that  they 
suppose  nothing  to  be  more  delightful.  Their  delights 
have  sometimes  been  communicated  to  me  .  .  . 

2044.  These  he  obtains  in  abundance,  and  with  delight, 
so  long  as  he  is  nothing  to  himself.  .  .  and  with  a 
perception  indefinitely  fuller  than  a  man  has  in  his  own 
delightR-clelectamentis  .  .  .  When  the  sensation  and 
perception  of  the  delights-(Mectame?iforwm-from  their 
own  loves  ceased. 

2621.  On  those  who  are  in  the  delight  of  adultery 
and  cruelty. 

3556.  The  Lord  .  .  .  insinuated  into  the  Angels  .  .  . 
affection  with  delight. 

3890.  (The  spirit)  is  in  .  .  .  wisdom  and  in  happiness, 
that  is,  in  the  highest  delights  originating  from  the 
affections  of  good. 

3949.  (Aristotle)  thought  from  the  delight  of  the 
affection,  which  reigned,  and  excited  him  to  think ;  so 
that  it  was  [characteristic]  of  him  to  think  from  affection, 
and  thence  the  delight  of  the  act.  .  .  But  his  followers 
.  .  .  [would  proceed]  from  mere  terms  ...  to  delight, 
which  cannot  exist,  except  from  some  affection,  which  is 


not  [with  them]  the  affection  and  thence  the  delight  of 
thinking,  but  an  external  cupidity  .  .  . 

39502.  The  philosophy  of  such  things  is  of  no  use. 
except  for  the  sake  of  the  delight. 

4363s.  His  pleasure  consisted  in  this,  that  he  was 
delighted  in  writing  (books)  .  .  .  This  was  his  sole 
pleasure  and  delight .  .  . 

4370.  Hence  it  may  appear  with  what  sort  of  delight 
the  most  malignant  Spirits  are  possessed. 

4416.  I  perceived  the  delight  (of  Cicero)  when  I  read 
the  prophetic  Word  .  .  . 

4428.  The  Plutonic  Spirits  are  delighted  with  immense 
treasures  of  gold  .  .  .  because  they  had  been  such  as  to 
place  all  their  delight-delectamentuni-m  such  things 
apart  from  use  .  .  . 

E.  39 117.  Worship  from  the  good  of  love  is  signified 
by  '  then  shalt  thou  be  delighted  with  the  sacrifices  of 
righteousness,  and  with  burnt-offering'  (Ps.li.  19). 

69613.  '  To  be  delighted  greatly  with  the  command- 
ments of  Jehovah'  (Ps.cxii.  i)  =  to  love  them,  thus  to 
will  and  do  them. 

86314.  That  she  will  then  be  accepted  by  the  Lord,  is 
signified  by  'then  shall  the  King  be  delighted  with  thy 
beauty'  (Ps.xlv.  11). 

C.  I90e.  Every  form  delights  by  its  varieties.  Examp. 

Delight.    Jucundam,  Juamditas* 
Delightful.    Jucundus. 
Delightfully.     Juainde. 
See  under  BLESS-frecwe,  and  Joy. 

A.  59.  The  fruits  of  tranquillity  and  peace,  with  their 
delights  and  happinesses.  Sig. 

85e.  With  external  tranquillity  and  Delight.  Sig. 

391.  In  punishing  and  tormenting  one  another  consists 
their  highest  Delight. 

545.  It  has  been  granted  to  perceive  the  Delights 
of  heavenly  joys  ...  It  is  an  affection  of  innumerable 
Delights  and  joys  .  .  . 

824.  In  adulteries  they  had  all  the  Delights  of  their 
life. 

830.  In  premeditated  deceits  they  feel  the  Delight  of 
life. 

831.  In  external  decorum  they  have  placed  all  .  .  . 
the  Delight  of  life. 

892.  The  man  is  then  carried  away  by  the  delight  of 
cupidities  and  of  pleasures  thence,  that  is,  by  the  delight 
of  his  own  loves  ;  and  because  by  delight,  it  appears  to 
him  as  if  it  were  free  .  .  . 

954.  See  DEhiGKT-delectai-e,  at  these  refs.  1773. 
2593-  3589-  H.347. 

995.  'To  you  it  shall  be  for  food '  =  its  delight  which 
they  would  enjoy.  .  .  Pleasure  without  delight  is  not 
pleasure  ...  It  is  from  delight  that  it  is,  and  is  called 
pleasure ;  such  as  is  the  delight,  such  is  the  pleasure. 
In  themselves,  corporeal  and  sensuous  things  are  merely 
material,  inanimate,  and  dead,  but  they  live  from  the 
delights  which  come  in  order  from  the  interiors.  Hence 
*  Jucunditas  is  distinguished  by  the  use  of  a  capital  D. 


D  eligtit—Jucunditm 


79 


"Delight-Jucundum 


it  is  evident,  that  such  as  is  the  life  of  the  interiors, 
such  is  the  Delight  of  the  pleasures,  for  in  delight  there 
is  life.  The  delight  in  which  there  is  good  from  the 
Lord  is  alone  alive  .  .  . 

3.  The   interior  affections,  which   are   alive,    all 

derive  their  delight  from  good  and  truth,  and  good  and 
truth  derive  their  delight  from  charity  and  faith  .  .  . 
When  pleasures  derive  their  origin  from  this  source, 
their  delight  indefinitely  surpasses  the  delight  which  is 
not  thence  derived  ;  this  is  relatively  filthy.  Exarnp. 
For  they  who  are  in  tnie  marriage  love,  are  in  a  certain 
heavenly  Delight  and  happiness  .  .  .  The  delight  from 
adulteries,  which  adulterers  feel,  was  to  them  so  abomin- 
able, that  they  were  horrified  when  they  merely  thought 
of  it.  Hence  may  be  evident  what  is  the  nature  of  the 
delight  which  does  not  descend  from  the  true  Fountain 
of  life.     (See  Pleasuke  at  this  ref.) 

996.  'Vegetables' = the  lower  things  of  Delights.  .  . 
Pleasures,  which  are  in  corporeal  or  outermost  things, 
originate  from  interior  delights  in  order ;  the  delights 
which  are  perceived  in  outermost  or  corporeal  things, 
are  relatively  low  ;  for  all  delight  is  such,  that  it  is  low 
or  vile  in  proportion  as  it  passes  to  external  things,  and 
happy  in  proportion  as  it  passes  to  internal  ones ; 
wherefore,  in  proportion  as  external  things  are  unrolled 
or  unswathed  in  order,  delights  become  more  pleasant 
and  happy,  as  may  be  sufficiently  evident  from  the  fact, 
that  while  he  lives  in  the  body,  the  delight  of  man's 
pleasures  is  vile  relatively  to  his  delight  after  the  life 
of  the  body  when  he  comes  into  the  World  of  Spirits  ; 
so  vile,  that  good  Spirits  utterly  reject  the  Delights  of 
the  body,  and  do  not  want  to  return  into  them  even 
although  all  things  in  the  universal  world  were  given 
them.  The  delight  of  these  Spirits  in  like  manner 
becomes  vile  when  they  are  elevated  by  the  Lord  into 
the  Heaven  of  Angelic  Spirits ;  for  they  then  put  off 
those  interior  Delights,  and  put  on  still  more  interior 
ones.  In  like  manner  does  the  delight  which  they  had 
in  their  own  Heaven  become  vile  to  Angelic  Spirits, 
when  they  are  carried  up  by  the  Lord  into  the  angelic 
or  Third  Heaven. 

997.  They  who  are  in  charity  .  .  .  from  which  love 
comes  the  delight  of  pleasures  which  is  alive,  have  no 
regard  for  the  enjoyment  of  pleasures  except  for  the 
sake  of  use  .  .  .  He  who  loves  his  neighbour  as  himself, 
never  perceives  the  delight  of  charity  except  in  exercise, 
or  use  .  .  .  Therefore,  all  the  pleasure  which  is  from 
charity,  has  its  own  delight  from  use  ;  and  the  more 
distinguished  the  use,  the  greater  the  delight .  .  .  This 
is  the  case  with  all  pleasure  ;  the  more  distinguished  its 
use,  the  greater  its  delight ;  as,  for  example,  the  delight 
of  marriage  love  ...  its  use  being  the  greatest  of  all, 
there  is  such  Delight  in  it,  that  it  is  heavenly  happiness. 

I096e.  The  delight  of  hatreds  and  of  adulteries, 
regarded  in  itself,  is  never  anything  but  an  excre- 
mentitious  delight ;  into  which,  also,  it  is  turned  in  the 
other  life. 

1 123.  They  said,  that  from  that  time  the  greatest 
delight  of  their  life  was  to  procreate  offspring,  so  that 
their  highest  deliciousnesses  were  to  love  their  married 
partner  for  the  sake  of  offspring  ;  they  called  these  most 
delightful  deliciousnesses,  and  most  delicious  Delights  ; 


adding,  that  the  perception  of  these  Delights  and  de- 
liciousnesses was  from  influx  from  Heaven,  because  the 
Lord  was  to  be  born. 

1267.  Their  greatest  Delight  consists  in  this,  that  one 
holds  another  subject  to  himself  .  .  . 

13 162.  The  sphere  of  one  who  regards  himself  in 
everything,  appropriates  to  itself,  or,  as  is  said  there, 
absorbs  ...  all  the  delight  of  the  Spirits  around  him 
.  .  .  But  when  the  people  is  one  .  .  .  one  never  appro- 
priates to  himself  the  delight  of  another  .  .  .  but,  as  far 
as  possible,  promotes  and  augments  it.     D.2505. 

1322.  As  soon  as  this  common  [bond]  is  dissolved 
their  delight  consists  in  this,  that  they  torture  their 
companions. 

1392.  The  Delights  and  happinesses  in  the  other  life 
are  also  wont  to  be  communicated  by  one  to  many  by  a 
real  transmission  ...  It  has  also  been  granted  to  me  so 
to  communicate  Delights  to  others  by  transmissions. 

1470.  For  all  truth  which  is  celestial ...  is  happy  in 
the  internal  man,  and  delightful  in  the  external.  . 
There  are  two  happinesses  in  the  internal  man,  to  which 
correspond  two  delights  in  the  external  man,  one  is  of 
good,  the  other  is  of  truth  ;  celestial  happiness  and 
delight  is  of  good,  spiritual  happiness  and  delight  is  of 
truth.  It  is  also  known  that  truth  itself  is  attended 
with  happiness  and  delight .  .  . 

1563.  These  organic  vessels  .  .  .  are  opened  also  by 
means  of  pleasures  and  delights  ;  the  things  ...  of  the 
will  are  opened  by  these. 

I7422-  They  are  like  men  .  .  .  who  place  the  whole  of 
life  in  the  delight  of  such  cupidities  ...  In  the  other 
life  .  .  .  they  perceive  this  stench  as  most  delightful. 

1 7632.  They  draw  out  the  secrets  of  others  ...  by 
means  of  insinuations  into  their  delights. 

18202.  As  soon  as  (evil  Genii)  .  .  .  perceive  as  it  were 
by  scent  that  which  is  delightful  and  dear  to  man,  they 
at  once  assault  and  endeavour  to  destroy  it .  .  . 

3.  They  kindle  (cupidity  and  persuasion)  with  a 

delight  which  they  seize  from  some  other  delight  of  the 
man  .  .  . 

i860.  They  who  are  in  hatred  perceive  a  certain 
delight ...  in  it ;  this  delight  .  .  .  causes  him  scarcely  to 
know  but  that  it  is  good  .  .  .  Such  delight  is  there  turned 
into  what  is  fetidly  excrementitious  and  cadaverous. 

18952.  No  one  can  become  rational,  unless  some  delight 
or  affection  of  knowledges  breathes  on  him. 

19473.  When  they  are  in  the  life  of  infernal  Spirits, 
they  are  also  in  their  loves  and  cupidities,  with  an 
impure  and  excrementitious  delight  breathino- on  them 

e.  Evil  is  not  mastered  by  the  renunciation  of  the 

Delights  of  the  body ;  sometimes  another  evil  is  thus 
raised  up,  namely,  merit  on  account  of  the  renunciation  ; 
besides  the  man's  freedom  suffering  .  .  . 

20573.  They  perceive  nothing  more  delightful  than  to 
torture  others  .  .  .  When  such  come  to  a  Society  where 
there  is  mutual  love,  they  are  cast  down  of  their  own 
accord,  because  all  the  influent  delight  is  terminated  in 
themselves  .  .  .  and  as  they  exhale  a  filthy  idea  of  self, 
their  delight  is  then  turned  into  a  cadaverous  fetor  .  .  . 

e.  They   are   in  self-love  who  .  .  .  take  a  cruel 


"Delight-fucundur 


SO 


"Deligllt-Jucwidt/m 


delight  in  revenge,  and  in  the  deprivation  of  others  of 
honour,  reputation,  wealth,  and  life.  They  who  are  in 
the  former  are  in  the  latter,  and  they  who  are  in  the 
latter  may  know  that  they  are  in  the  former. 

[A.]  21847.  Natural  good  is  the  delight  which  is  per- 
ceived from  charity,  or  from  the  friendship  which  is  of 
charity,  from  which  delight  comes  forth  the  pleasure 
which  is  properly  of  the  body.  Natural  truth  is  the 
Scientific  which  favours  this  delight. 

2204.  Human  rational  good  is  such  that  it  has  in  it 
much  from  worldly  delights,  for  it  is  formed  not  only 
from  truths,  but  also  from  the  delights  of  sensuous 
things,  and  from  many  delights  which  are  in  the 
world ;  in  which  delights,  when  the  man  is  being 
reformed  and  regenerated,  spiritual  good  is  insinuated 
by  the  Lord  .  .  . 

2216.  Celestial  good  and  spiritual  good  does  not  laugh, 
but  expresses  its  delight  and  cheerfulness  in  the  face, 
speech,  and  gesture  in  another  manner. 

226 13.  Perceive  delight  in  the  loss  of  (their  neigh- 
bour's) wealth,  honour,  etc.     29  io2. 

2272.  (In  temptations)  the  delights  of  the  life  of 
cupidities  and  thence  of  pleasures  cease,  and  then  goods 
from  the  Lord  flow  in,  and  evils  are  regarded  as  abomin- 
able .  .  . 

2296.  How  all  things  are  insinuated  into  (little 
children  there)  by  means  of  delightful  and  pleasant 
things.  Des.     H.337. 

2354s.  Feel  delight  in  revenge,  yea,  in  cruelty  .  .  . 

2363.  Evil  Spirits  suppose  that  if  the  delight  of  the 
love  of  self  and  of  the  world,  thus  of  the  evils  thence, 
were  to  be  taken  away,  nothing  of  life  could  remain  to 
them  ;  but  when  it  is  shown  them,  that  life  itself  with 
its  blessedness  and  happiness  then  commences,  they  feel 
a  certain  sadness  from  the  loss  of  their  own  delight .  .  . 

23S03.  They  do  evil  to  the  neighbour,  although  he  is 
their  friend,  if  he  does  not  favour  them,  and  perceive 
delight  therein.     37012. 

2559.  "When  he  left  the  Scientific  and  the  appearances 
thence,  with  their  delights.  Sig.  .  .  '  House, '  here,  =  the 
good  of  the  delight  from  the  appearances  of  scientific 
and  rational  things  ;  for  all  delight  appears  as  good. 

25  SS3.  They  confirm  themselves  in  this,  that  there 
cannot  be  any  other  love  in  which  there  is  delight,  but 
the  love  of  self  and  of  the  world. 

4.  The  celestial  and  spiritual  good  which  is  from 

the  Lord,  is  that  by  which  every  good  which  is  below  is 
vivified,  and  thence  delight  is  truly  delight. 

2657s.  The  second  Rational  .  .  .  begins  to  feel  delight 
in  good  and  truth  itself ;  and  to  be  affected  with  this 
delight  .  .  .  for  the  sake  of  good  and  truth  ;  and  when 
it  is  carried  along  by  this  delight,  it  rejects  merit .  .  . 
This  delight  successively  grows  with  it,  and  becomes 
blessedness  .  .  . 

27 1 S4.  All  delight,  blessedness,  and  happiness  are  of 
love  alone  ;  but  such  as  is  the  love,  such  are  the  delight, 
blessedness,  and  happiness.     35394. 

2743.  A  guard  lest  in  marriage  love  a  man  should 
pass  over  from  heavenly  delight  to  infernal  delight,  and 


the  reverse.  For  they  who  are  in  genuine  marriage  love 
are  in  heavenly  delight ;  but  they  who  are  in  adulteries 
are  also  in  delight  which  appears  to  them  as  heavenly, 
but  it  is  infernal.     505  ie. 

2744.  It  was  shown  me  how  delights  progress  from 
marriage  love,  on  one  side  towards  Heaven,  on  the  other 
towards  Hell.   Ex. 

2753.  They  study  how  to  purloin  the  delights  and 
blessednesses  of  others  .  .  . 

2  78 12.  Natural  good  is  the  delight  flowing  forth  from 
charity  and  faith.     3i67e. 

2S73e.  Hence  in  the  other  life  all  are  distinguished 
according  to  freedoms,  that  is,  according  to  loves  and 
affections,  consequently  according  to  the  delights  of 
life,  which  is  the  same  as  according  to  lives  ;  for  lives 
are  nothing  but  delights,  and  these  are  nothing  but  the 
affections  which  are  of  love. 

2S84.  Love,  affection,  and  delight  are  so  called  in 
both  senses,  although  the  love  of  self  and  the  world  is 
nothing  less  than  love  .  .  .  consequently  the  affection 
and  delight  therefrom. 

2S89e.  The  veriest  life  then  flows  in,  and  afterwards 
is  immensely  increased  ;  and  this  with  delight,  blessed- 
ness, and  happiness,  thus  with  inmost  joy  ;  and  this 
with  inexpressible  variety  to  eternity. 

3ii4e.  The  goods  of  the  natural  man  are  delights, 
especially  such  as  are  of  the  affection  of  (scientific) 
truths. 

3293.  Good  in  the  Natural  is  everything  which  is  of 
natural  affection,  and  is  called  delight  .  .  .  The  Scientific 
by  itself,  abstractedly  from  the  delight  which  is  of  affec- 
tion, is  not  anything ;  from  the  delight  there  the 
Natural  has  its  life,  for  it  is  from  this  that  it  is  able  to 
know  anything.  Delight,  however,  which  is  the  good 
of  the  Natural  devoid  of  what  is  scientific,  is  something, 
but  is  only  the  vital  [principle],  such  as  exists  with 
infants  .  .  . 

3325s.  At  which  time  good  cannot  be  discriminated 
from  the  delight  of  the  love  of  self  and  of  the  world, 
which  is  at  the  same  time  in  the  affection  of  truth,  and 
is  believed  to  be  good.     3330. 

34022.  He  is  in  the  persuasion  that  evil  is  good  and 
falsity  truth,  and  this  from  the  affection  and  the  conse- 
quent delight  of  them. 

34 1 72.  At  this  time  (the  disciples)  did  not  know  that 
heavenly  delight  is  not  the  delight  of  greatness  and 
pre-eminence,  but  the  delight  of  humiliation  and  of  the 
affection  of  being  of  service  to  others  .  .  . 

3.  So  they  who  are  in  the  (mere)  knowledge  of 

Knowledges  cannot  know  that  any  other  delight  exists 
than  that  which  results  from  pre-eminence  ;  and  as  this 
delight  alone  is  seated  in  their  minds,  and  makes  every- 
thing of  their  life,  heavenly  delight,  which  results  from 
humiliation  and  the  affection  of  being  of  service  to 
others,  that  is,  the  delight  of  love  to  the  Lord  and  of 
charity  towards  the  neighbour  .  .  .  they  are  utterly 
ignorant  of.     (This  is  why  the  Lord  so  spake.) 

3502.  In  the  Original  Language,  'dainties'  are  the 
delights  and  pleasantnesses  of  relish ;  and,  in  the 
internal  sense,  =  the  delights  which  are  of  good,  and 
the  pleasantnesses  which  are  of  truth. 


"De]igh.t-Jitae?2dum 


81 


Deligllt-Jitcundum 


-.  Doctrinal  things  or  Knowledges  of  good  and 

truth  cannot  be  communicated  to  the  natural  man,  thus 
cannot  be  conjoined  and  appropriated,  except  by  means 
of  delights  and  pleasantnesses  accommodated  to  it ;  for 
they  are  insinuated  through  an  external  or  sensuous 
way ;  and  whatever  does  not  enter  by  means  of  some 
delight  or  pleasantness,  does  not  inhere,  thus  is  not 
permanent. 

3512.  Truths,  like  all  other  scientifics,  are  allotted  a 
place  in  the  memory  which  is  of  the  natural  man,  ac- 
cording to  the  pleasantnesses  and  delights  which  intro- 
duced them  ;  as  is  evident  from  the  fact,  that  when 
these  pleasantnesses  and  delights  return,  the  things 
introduced  by  them  also  return  ;  and,  conversely,  when 
the  things  are  recalled,  the  delights  or  pleasantnesses  to 
which  they  are  adjoined  are  excited  at  the  same  time. 

35 182.  By  means  of  (the  good  which  man  receives 
from  his  parents),  as  by  pleasure  and  delight,  scientifics 
are  introduced,  and  afterwards  the.  Knowledges  of  truth 
.  .  .  (for)  when  a  child  is  first  instructed,  he  is  affected 
with  the  desire  of  knowing  .  .  .  from  a  certain  pleasure 
and  delight,  both  connate  and  derived  from  other  sources 
.  .  .  but  when  he  is  to  be  regenerated,  from  the  delight 
and  pleasantness  of  truth  ;  and  when  he  is  being  regener- 
ated .  .  .  from  the  love  of  truth  .  .  .  and  then  the  ends 
which  had  preceded,  and  their  delights,  are  separated  by 
little  and  little,  and  are  succeeded  by  interior  good  from 
the  Lord  .  .  .  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  the  former 
delights,  which  had  appeared  in  the  external  form  as 
goods,  had  served  as  means. 

3519.  The  things  in  the  Natural  which  relate  to  the 
will  are  delights,  and  those  which  relate  to  the  under- 
standing there  are  scientifics ;  these  two  must  be 
conjoined  for  there  to  be  anything. 

35705.  Foods  are  introduced  by  means  of  the  delight 
of  appetite,  and  by  the  delight  of  relish,  thus  by  means 
of  external  good. 

6.  (So)   the   soul  .  .  .  introduces    the    things    of 

knowledge  and  of  doctrine  by  means  of  the  delight 
which  is  of  longing,  and  the  good  which  is  of  affection. 

3577.  Hence  it  is,  that  the  delights  of  good  and  the 
pleasantnesses  of  truth,  which  are  perceived  in  the  other 
life,  manifest  themselves  there  also  by  corresponding 
odours. 

3610.  There  is  then  some  pleasure  and  delight  from 
the  love  of  self,  or  from  the  love  of  the  world,  which 
adjoins  itself  to  the  affection  of  truth,  and  which  appears 
as  good,  when  yet  it  is  not  good,  except  relatively  to  the 
use,  that  thus  truths  can  be  introduced  and  learned  .  .  . 

3665s.  The  affection  of  the  Angels  is  then  communi- 
cated, and  causes  the  delight  and  pleasure  which  a 
child  feels  from  these  things  (in  the  Word). 

367 1'2.  Still  more  when  he  perceives  delight  in  acting 
these  things  .  .  . 

37013.  This  delight  itself  (in  the  ruin  of  those  who 
injure  us)  is  there  manifestly  perceived,  wherefore  he 
cannot  be  in  any  heavenly  Society  .  .  .  but  in  some 
infernal  Society,  which  has  a  similar  delight. 

6.  At  last  he  perceives  delight  in  doing  good  to 

(those  who  are  in  good)  ;  and  as  he  perceives  delight  in 
good,  he  also  perceives   pleasantness  in   those   things 
which  confirm  .  .  . 
VOL.  11. 


7.   In   the  same  degree  in   which   he    perceives 

delight  in  this  good,  and  pleasantness  in  these  truths, 
he  feels  undelight  in  the  evils  of  the  former  life,  and 
unpleasantness  in  its  falsities  .  .  . 

3709e.  The  truths  of  the  good  of  doctrine  are  the 
doctrinal  things  of  love  to  the  Lord  and  of  charity 
towards  the  neighbour,  which  are  said  to  be  conjoined 
with  good  in  the  natural  man,  when  there  is  pleasure 
and  delight  in  knowing  them  for  the  sake  of  doing  them. 

3726s.  There  are  purer  substances  .  .  .  the  agreements 
and  harmonies  of  which,  in  succession  or  together,  are 
what  affect,  and  cause  that  which  is  called  beauty, 
pleasantness,  and  delight. 

3743.  They  suppose  that  if  they  lived  from  another, 
and  not  from  themselves,  all  the  delight  of  their  life 
would  perish  ;  not  knowing  that  it  is  just  the  contrary. 

e.  Hence  come  colours  beautiful  and  delightful, 

and  also  unbeautiful  and  undelightful. 

37963.  If  anyone  wants  to  know  the  ends  in  himself, 
let  him  only  attend  to  the  delight  which  he  perceives 
in  himself  from  praise  and  self-glory,  and  to  the  delight 
which  he  perceives  from  use  separated  from  himself :  if 
he  perceives  the  latter  delight,  he  is  in  genuine  affection. 

3843s.  Truth  ...  is  then  no  longer  sent  into  act  from 
knowledge  or  doctrine,  but  from  a  certain  delight  un- 
known to  him  .  .  . 

3870.  The  second  life  manifests  itself  by  the  affection 
of  doing  the  truth  .  .  .  which  exists  when  delight  and 
blessedness  are  perceived  in  doing  the  truth. 

3876.  When  a  man  is  affected  with  truth,  that  is, 
when  he  perceives  delight  and  blessedness  in  doing  ac- 
cording to  the  truth,  he  is  in  charity. 

3928.  The  external  man  is  such,  that  of  himself  he 
lusts  for  nothing  but  corporeal  and  worldly  things,  these 
being  the  delights  of  his  life  ;  but  the  internal  man, 
when  he  is  opened  towards  Heaven,  and  longs  for  the 
things  of  Heaven  .  .  .  has  heavenly  delights,  and  the 
combat  is  between  these  two  delights,  when  man  is  in 
temptations.  This  the  man  is  at  that  time  not  aware 
of,  because  he  does  not  know  what  heavenly  delight  is, 
and  what  infernal  delight,  still  less  that  they  are  so 
completely  opposite  to  each  other.  But  the  Celestial 
Angels  cannot  be  at  all  with  man  in  his  corporeal  and 
worldly  delight,  until  this  is  reduced  to  compliance, 
that  is,  until  corporeal  and  worldly  delight  is  no  longer 
as  the  end,  but  as  a  use  which  is  of  service  to  heavenly 
delight.  Then  the  Angels  can  be  with  man  in  both, 
but  then  the  delight  with  him  becomes  blessedness,  and 
at  last  happiness  in  the  other  life. 

2.  He  who  believes  that  the  natural  delight  with 

man  before  regeneration  is  not  infernal,  is  much  mis- 
taken ...  If  he  does  not  perceive  in  himself  anything  of 
affection  for  what  is  just  and  fair  in  his  employment, 
and  for  what  is  good  and  true  in  company  and  in  life, 
let  him  know  that  he  is  in  such  delight  as  the  infernals 
are  in  ;  for  in  his  delight  there  is  no  other  love,  than 
that  of  self  and  the  world  ;  and  when  these  cause 
the  delight,  there  is  no  charity  and  no  faith  therein. 
After  this  delight  has  prevailed,  it  cannot  be  blunted 
and  dissipated  by  any  other  means,  than  the  affirmation 

F 


"DeYighit-Jucundum 


82 


"DelightSucundw/i 


and  acknowledgment  of  the  Holy  of  faith  and  the  good 
of  life,  which  is  the  first  means  signified  by  'Dan' ;  and 
afterwards  by  temptation,  which  is  the  second  means 
signified  by  'Naphtali.'  Ex. 

[A.]  3938.  In  the  external  sense  (these  words)— the 
delight  of  the  affections. 

3.  The  delight  of  the  affections  is  signified  in  the 

external  sense  (by  'blessedness-beatitudineyn'). 

4.  But  it  is  the  delight  of  the  affections  of  truth 

and  good,  which  corresponds  to  the  happiness  of  eternal 
life,  that  is  signified.  All  affections  have  their  own 
delights,  but  such  as  are  the  affections,  such  are  the 
delights  ;  the  affections  of  evil  and  falsity  have  also 
their  delights,  and  before  man  is  being  regenerated  .  .  . 
these  delights  appear  to  be  the  only  ones  .  .  .  conse- 
quently, that  if  they  were  deprived  of  them  they  would 
perish  altogether.  But  they  who  receive  from  the  Lord 
the  delights  of  the  affections  of  truth  and  good,  by 
degrees  see  and  perceive  the  quality  of  the  delights  of 
that  life  .  .  .  that  they  are  relatively  vile,  yea,  filthy  ; 
and  in  proportion  as  advance  is  made  into  the  delights 
of  the  affections  of  truth  and  good,  the  man  begins  to 
hold  cheap  those  delights  of  evil  and  of  falsity,  and  at 
last  to  feel  aversion  for  them. 

5.    I  have  sometimes  spoken  with  those  in  the 

other  life  who  have  been  in  the  delights  of  evil  and 
falsity,  and  was  permitted  to  tell  them,  that  they  have 
no  life  until  they  are  deprived  of  their  delights  ;  but 
they  said  that  if  they  were  deprived  of  them  there  would 
no  longer  be  any  life.  But  I  was  permitted  to  reply, 
that  then  life  first  begins  .  .  .  The  case  is  the  same  with 
all  those  in  the  world  who  are  in  the  love  of  self  and  of 
the  world,  and  thence  in  no  charity  ;  they  know  the 
delight  of  the  former  loves,  but  not  the  delight  of  the 
latter  .  .  .  wherefore,  they  are  quite  ignorant  of  what 
charity  is,  and  still  more  that  there  is  any  delight  in 
charity,  when  yet  the  delight  of  charity  is  that  which 
fills  the  universal  Heaven,  and  causes  there  blessedness 
and  happiness  .  .  .  and  also  intelligence  and  wisdom 
with  their  delights  ;  for  the  Lord  inflows  into  the 
delights  of  charity  with  the  light  of  truth  and  the  flame 
of  good  .  .  .  Hence  may  be  evident  what  is  the  delight 
of  the  affections. 

6.  When  they  come  into  the  other  life,  they  at 

first  think  .  .  .  that  they  can  come  into  Heaven,  not 
attending  to  their  past  life,  that  thereby  they  have  put 
on  the  delight  of  the  affection  of  evil  and  falsity  by  the 
loves  of  self  and  of  the  world  .  .  . 

.  Hence  it  is  evident  what  is  the  quality  of  the 

one  delight,  and  what  is  the  quality  of  the  other  delight ; 
and  that  they  who  are  in  the  delight  of  the  affections  of 
evil  and  falsity,  cannot  possibly  be  among  those  who  are 
in  the  delight  of  the  affection  of  good  and  truth  ;  and 
that  they  are  opposites,  like  Heaven  and  Hell.  Refs. 

7.  As  to  the  happiness  of  eternal  life,  the  man 

who  is  in  the  affection  of  good  and  truth  cannot  perceive 
it  while  he  lives  in  the  world,  but  in  place  of  it  a  certain 
delight ...  for  it  falls  among  the  cares  and  anxieties 
there,  and  becomes  a  kind  of  obscure  delight ;  yet  still 
it  is  a  delight  in  which  there  is  blessedness,  and  in 
this  happiness. 

e.  It  is  this  continuity  of  love  which  reigns  in 

the  life  of  man,  and  which  causes  all  delight  with 


him,  and  which  therefore  causes  his  life  itself ;  for  the 
life  of  man  is  nothing  but  the  delight  which  is  of  his 
affection  .  .  . 

3939.  'Asher'  .  .  .  involves  .  .  .  the  delight  of  the 
affections  which  corresponds  to  the  happiness  of  eternal 
life.  .  .  When  a  man  perceives  in  himself  this  corre- 
spondent delight,  his  external  man  begins  to  be  con- 
joined with  his  internal  man  :  it  is  the  delights  which 
are  of  the  affections  of  truth  and  good  which  conjoin  ; 
for  without  the  delights  of  the  affections  nothing  is 
conjoined  ;  for  the  life  of  man  is  in  them.  .  .  When  a 
man  perceives  this  delight,  or  this  affection,  he  begins 
to  become  a  Church. 

395 12.  The  goods  of  the  external  man,  which  are  the 
delights  of  life  while  man  lives  in  the  world,  are  so  far 
good  as  they  have  of  spiritual  good  in  them.  Examp. 

39524.  The  good  of  the  external  man  is  the  pleasure 
and  delight  which  he  perceives  in  these  (scientifics  and 
doctrinal  things) ;  the  scientifics  which  are  truths,  and 
the  delights  which  are  good,  are  conjoined,  but  do  not 
make  the  heavenly  marriage  with  him  ;  for  with  those 
who  are  in  the  love  of  self  and  of  the  world  .  .  .  even 
scientifics,  yea,  doctrinal  things,  are  conjoined  with 
delights,  but  they  are  the  delights  of  these  loves,  with 
which  also  truths  are  able  to  be  conjoined.  But  when 
the  pleasure  or  delight,  which  is  the  good  of  the  external 
man,  is  from  spiritual  love  .  .  .  and  especially  when  it 
is  from  celestial  love  .  .  .  and  these  things  flow  in  from 
the  internal  man  into  the  delight  of  the  external  man, 
and  make  it,  then  that  conjunction  .  .  .  makes  with 
him  the  heavenly  marriage. 

3956.  This  is  the  delight  itself,  yea,  the  blessedness, 
which  is  with  those  who  are  in  the  affection  of  charity. 
Hence  may  be  evident  what  'the  hire'  is  which  is  men- 
tioned in  the  Word,  namely,  the  delight  and  blessedness 
of  the  affection  of  charity,  or,  what  is  the  same,  the 
delight  and  blessedness  of  mutual  love. 

3957s.  He  who  has  found  in  deceit  the  delight  of  his 
life  ...  is  in  that  life  after  death. 

.  These  evils  constitute  the  delights  of  their  life, 

consequently,  the  very  life  itself. 

5.  He  who  .  .  .  has  acquired  the  delight  of  life  in 

these  things  only,  is  not  fit  to  be  among  those  whose 
delight  it  is  to  think  of  heavenly  things. 

7.  This  plane  can  only  be  acquired  by  .  .  .  thus 

acquiring  the  delight  of  life  in  such  things  .  .  . 

402  72.  From  the  Angels,  that  is,  through  the  Angels 
from  the  Lord,  there  inflows  delight  and  blessedness 
with  the  man  who  is  in  the  affection  of  charity  when  he 
reads  these  (arcana) ;  and  still  more  so  when  he  believes 
there  is  holiness  in  them  ;  and  still  more  so  when  he 
apprehends  anything  that  is  contained  in  the  in- 
ternal sense. 

40382.  The  delight,  pleasure,  and  longing  desire  (in 
the  Natural)  pertain  to  the  will,  and  are  called  natural 
goods  ;  but  the  scientifics  there  to  the  understanding, 
and  are  called  natural  truths. 

40542.  They  are  pests  .  .  .  although  .  .  .  while  they 
were  in  the  world,  they  appeared  as  if  they  were  good, 
delightful,  witty,  and  ingenious  .  .  . 

40632.  The  new  man  is  in  the  affection  of  spiritual 


"De\ig)a.t-Jucundiim 


83 


T)eW.gkL\i-Jucundum 


and  celestial  things  ;  these  things  constitute  his  delights 
and  blessednesses  ;  whereas  the  old  man  is  in  the  affec- 
tion of  worldly  and  earthly  things,  and  these  constitute 
his  delights  and  pleasantnesses. 

4.  Each  age  (of  man)  has  its  own  delights,  and  is 

successively  introduced  through  them  into  the  things 
that  belong  to  the  age  following  ;  and  these  delights 
were  of  service  in  bringing  him  thither,  and  at  last  to 
the  delight  of  intelligence  and  wisdom  in  old  age.  .  . 
This  comparison,  however,  can  only  serve  to  show  that 
delights  are  means,  and  that  they  are  left  behind  when 
the  man  enters  the  following  state  .  .  . 

40673.  He  who  has  delight  in  revenge  (associates  to 
himself)  such  (Societies)  as  are  in  the  like  delight ;  and 
so  in  all  other  cases  .  .  .  He  is  altogether  ruled  by  them 
.  .  .  although  he  supposes,  from  the  delight  and  conse- 
quent freedom  he  enjoys,  that  he  rules  himself.  He, 
however  .  .  .  who  has  not  delight  in  revenge,  is  in  a 
Society  of  the  like  Angels  .  .  . 

4.  Hence  may  be  evident  how  the  case  is  .  .  . 

with  the  mediate  delights  and  goods  by  which  man  is 
led  .  .  .  The  mediate  goods  and  delights  are  nothing  but 
such  Societies  as  are  applied  to  man  by  the  Lord  .  .  . 

41  io2.  The  Spirits  of  a  middle  sort .  .  .  are  remitted 
into  the  state  of  their  good  .  .  .  that  they  may  perceive 
therein  their  delight  and  blessedness  .  .  .  until  they  feel 
what  is  undelightful  in  staying  longer  .  .  .  and  when 
the  man  begins  to  be  confirmed  .  .  .  they  perceive  what 
is  undelightful,  and  perceive  delight  in  separation,  and 
thus  are  separated  by  virtue  of  the  freedom  which  is  of 
their  delight. 

41 36s.  "With  those  who  are  not  being  regenerated, 
goods  are  not  the  things  which  are  changed,  but  affec- 
tions and  their  delights  .  .  . 

3.  (This  learned  leading  man  in  the  Church)  was 

in  such  stupid  ignorance  about  good  and  freedom,  and 
about  the  delight  and  blessedness  thence  derived,  that 
he  did  not  know  of  the  least  difference  between  infernal 
delight  and  freedom,  and  heavenly  delight  and 
freedom  .  .  . 

42052.  Truths  with  man,  of  any  and  every  kind,  enter 
into  his  memory  by  means  of  affection,  that  is,  by  means 
of  some  delight  which  is  of  love  ;  without  affection,  or 
without  the  delight  which  is  of  love,  nothing  can  enter 
with  man,  because  his  life  consists  in  these  things. 
Those  things  which  have  entered  are  reproduced  when 
the  like  delight  recurs  .  .  .  ;  and  also  when  the  same 
truth  is  reproduced  .  .  .  that  affection  or  delight .  .  . 
is  excited  .  .  . 

43013.  This  may  be  illustrated  by  a  comparison  with 
the  sight  of  the  eye,  and  with  the  pleasantness  and 
delight  perceived  by  it.  When  the  eye  sees  objects,  it 
perceives  pleasantness  and  delight  thence  according  to 
the  forms,  colours,  etc.  .  .  This  pleasantness  and  delight 
is  not  of  the  eye,  but  is  of  the  disposition  and  its  affec- 
tion .  .  .  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  the  objects  of  the 
outward  sight  are  implanted  according  to  the  pleasant- 
ness and  delight  of  the  affections,  and  that  they  are  in 
this  pleasantness  and  delight ;  for  when  the  like 
pleasantness  and  delight  recur,  such  objects  also  recur  ; 
in  like  manner  when  the  like  objects  recur,  so  does  such 
pleasantness  and  delight,  with  variety  according  to  the 


states.     It  is  the  very  same  with  the  understanding  .  .  . 
the  pleasantness  and  delight  of  this  sight  is  good  .  .  . 

43 1 75.  Hereditary  evil ...  is  Known  by  the  delight 
when  evil  befalls  another  ...  It  is  from  hereditary  evil 
...  to  perceive  delight  in  revenge  .  .  . 

441 7e.  The  quality  of  the  state  of  their  life  was  shown 
by  the  withdrawal  of  their  delight  derived  from  falsity, 
which  in  the  other  life  is  effected  by  the  separation  of 
the  Spirits  in  whose  Society  they  are  .  .  . 

4459/.  They  who  place  all  the  delight  of  life  in 
possessing  (gold  and  silver),  are  in  the  outermost  or 
lowest  things. 

4464s.  But  they  who  are  in  internal  things,  to  wit, 
who  have  had  delight  in  benevolence  and  charity,  and 
especially  they  who  have  had  blessedness  in  love"  to  the 
Lord,  are  encompassed  with  a  grateful  and  pleasant 
sphere .  .  . 

4538s.  At  last,  when  a  man  perceives  delight  in  will- 
ing good,  and  thence  in  doing  it,  it  is  no  longer  called 
the  good  of  truth,  but  good  ;  for  he  is  then  regenerate. 

455 12.  The  unregenerate  man  regards  those  things 
as  removed  from  him,  which  do  not  agree  with  the 
delight  of  the  love  in  which  he  is  .  .  . 

4609.  In  the  external  sense,  'Asher'  =  the  delight  of 
affection. 

46 1 23.  As  at  this  time  he  is  in  the  delights  of  the 
love  of  self  and  of  the  world  ...  he  regards  as  goods  and 
truths  those  things  which  favour  his  delights.  Hence 
the  order  of  them  in  the  Natural  is  inverted  .  .  .  but 
still  the  things  which  are  of  light  .  .  .  are  not  in  the 
Natural ;  for  the  delights  which  are  dominant  there 
repel  them  ;  for  the  delights  of  the  love  of  self  and  of 
the  world  are  in  themselves  entirely  opposite  to  the 
delights  of  the  love  of  the  neighbour  and  thence  of  love 
to  the  Lord.  .  .  He  is  affected  with  the  things  of  light 
only  in  so  far  as  they  .  .  .  favour  the  delights  of  the 
love  of  self  and  of  the  world. 

4769.  '  A  he-goat  of  the  goats '  =  external  truths  from 
delights  (for  'he-goats  of  the  goats') =the  truths  of  the 
natural  man  from  which  are  the  delights  of  life  ;  and 
also  external  truths  from  delights.  The  truths  of  the 
external  man  from  which  are  the  delights  of  life,  are  truths 
Divine  such  as  are  those  of  the  literal  sense  of  the  Word 
.  .  .  These  are  properly  signified  by  'a  he-goat,'  and  the 
delights  thence  derived  by  'the  goats  ;'  thus  'a  he-goat 
of  the  goats  '  =  those  who  are  in  such  truths  and  the 
delights  thence  derived.  But  in  the  opposite  sense,  'a 
he-goat  of  the  goats '  =  those  who  are  in  external  truths, 
that  is,  in  the  appearances  of  truth  from  the  sense  of 
the  letter  which  agree  with  the  delights  of  their  life,  as 
those  which  agree  with  the  delights  of  the  body  that  are 
in  general  called  pleasures,  and  those  which  agree  with 
the  delights  of  the  disposition  which  in  general  are 
honours  and  gains.  .  .  Such  .  .  .  take  no  other  truths 
from  the  Word  than  those  which  are  in  agreement  with 
the  delights  of  their  life,  that  is,  which  favour  the  loves 
of  self  and  of  the  world. 

47762.  Their  delight,  joyousness,  and  happiness,  is 
from  this,  that  they  can  do  good  to  others  from  good- 
will. 


"Deligh.t-J'iuutidum 


84 


Delight  -Jucundum 


[A.]  4804.  They  who  in  the  life  of  the  body  have  pre- 
ferred the  delight  of  social  intercourse  to  every  other  de- 
light ...  I  could  observe  that  such  Societies  were  with 
me  ...  by  the  deprivation  of  the  delight  in  which  I  was 
.  .  .  for  wherever  they  go  they  take  away  the  delight 
from  others,  and  .  .  .  appropriate  it  to  themselves  ;  for 
they  turn  to  themselves  the  Spirits  who  are  with  others, 
and  thus  transfer  the  delight  of  another  to  themselves. 

4805.  There  are  also  Societies  of  interior  friendship, 
which  do  not  take  away  another's  external  delight  .  .  . 
but  take  away  his  internal  delight  or  blessedness  arising 
from  the  affection  of  spiritual  things.  Ex. 

4940.  (The  Spirits  who  are  in  the  places  beneath  the 
feet),  are  such  as  had  been  in  natural  delight,  and  not 
in  spiritual. 

4951.  In  this  Hell  are  the  most  wicked  ;  they  clandes- 
tinely explore  minds  with  a  purpose  of  doing  harm,  and 
clandestinely  lay  an  ambush  in  order  to  destroy  ;  this 
has  been  the  delight  of  their  life. 

4976.  The  Scientific  to  the  delight  of  the  natural 
man  ;  or,  what  is  the  same,  natural  truth  to  its  good,  is 
just  as  is  water  to  bread  ;  (and  is  necessary  to  it). 

49S4e.  The  good  of  faith  (as  distinguished  from  the 
truth  of  faith),  affects  .  .  .  the  will,  and  gives  it  interior 
delight  or  blessedness,  and,  in  the  other  life,  the  happi- 
ness which  is  called  heavenly  joy. 

50063.  Hence  it  is,  that  it  is  contrary  to  the  delight 
of  the  life  of  most  people,  to  hear  anything  more  about 
the  things  of  Heaven  than  they  had  known  from  early 
childhood. 

5057.  (I  saw  a  man  who  seemed  to  himself  to  be 
pounding  men  in  a  mortar) ;  this  the  man  did  with  great 
Delight ;  the  Delight  itself  was  communicated,  that  I 
might  know  the  nature  and  degree  of  it  with  such 
persons  ;  it  was  an  infernal  Delight.  I  was  told  .  .  . 
that  such  a  delight  reigned  among  the  descendants  of 
Jacob,  and  that  they  perceived  nothing  more  delightful 
than  treating  the  nations  cruelly  ..  .  D.2615.  De  Conj. 
109. 

50582.  In  an  hour,  the  good  there  began  to  lament 
that  (this  deceitful  Spirit)  took  away  from  them  the 
perception  of  good  and  truth,  and  consequently  their 
delight,  thus  destroying  their  state. 

5i25e.  When  sensuous  things  are  in  the  last  place, 
there  flows  in  happiness  and  blessedness  from  the  in- 
terior man  into  the  delights  of  sensuous  things,  and 
makes  their  delights  a  thousand  times  surpass  the  former 
delights  .  .  .  The  sensuous  man  does  not  believe  this ; 
and  as  he  feels  no  other  delight,  and  does  not  suppose 
any  higher  delight  to  be  possible,  he  regards  as  of  no 
account  the  happiness  and  blessedness  which  are  within 
the  delights  of  sensuous  things. 

51453.  Without  these  degrees  as  planes,  good  .  .  .  flows 
through  .  .  .  down  to  the  Sensuous,  and  is  there  .  .  . 
turned  .  .  .  into  the  delight  of  the  love  of  self  and  of  the 
world,  thus  into  the  delight  of  hatred,  revenge,  cruelty, 
adultery,  avarice  .  .  .     . 

51473.  Foods  without  delights  are  of  little  use,  but 
with  delights  they  nourish  :  delights  are  what  open  the 
passages  or  ducts  which  convey  into  the  blood  ;  whereas 


things  undelightful  close  them.  With  the  Angels, 
these  delights  are  the  goods  of  love  and  charity,  which 
are  spiritual  foods  .  .  . 

51572.  By  sensuous  things  are  meant  those  scientifics 
and  those  delights  which  are  insinuated  through  the  five 
bodily  senses  into  the  memory  and  concupiscences  of 
man,  and  which  together  constitute  the  exterior  Natural 
.  .  .  These  scientifics  are  subject  to  the  intellectual  part, 
and  the  delights  to  the  will  part  .  .  .  The  former  are 
represented  by  '  the  butler, '  and  were  retained  ;  but  the 
latter  by  'the  baker,'  and  were  rejected. 

5159.  With  those  who  are  being  regenerated  .  .  .  some- 
what inwardly  dissuades,  to  prevent  sensuous  Delights 
and  corporeal  or  earthly  pleasures  from  reigning,  and 
drawing  intellectual  things  over  to  their  side.  Sig. 

5279e.  The  delight  of  the  love  of  self  and  of  the  world 
is  removed  by  means  of  despair  ;  and  in  its  place  is  in- 
sinuated the  delight  of  the  love  of  good  and  truth. 

5340e.  Truth  is  conjoined  with  good,  when  a  man 
perceives  delight  in  doing  good  to  the  neighbour  for  the 
sake  of  truth  and  good  .  .  . 

S3542.  From  the  new  will,  he  feels  delight  in  doing 
good  to  the  neighbour  from  no  end  of  self ;  and  from  the 
new  intellectual,  he  perceives  delight  in  learning  what 
is  good  and  true  for  their  own  sake  and  for  the  sake  of 
life. 

53654.  Scarcely  anyone  has  said  that  (the  highest 
good)  is  that  delight,  joyousness,  blessedness,  and  happi- 
ness, which  is  perceived  from  mutual  love  .  .  . 

5394.  (These)  stenches  are  most  sweet  and  most  de- 
lightful to  them,  and  they  prefer  them  to  all  other 
delights,  because  they  correspond.     e. 

5395.  (Such)  have  no  delight  in  offices,  but  only  in 
being  honoured  and  worshipped  .  .  .  and  in  eating, 
drinking,  playing,  and  social  intercourse  .  .  .  Such  can- 
not be  with  good  Spirits  and  Angels,  for  with  these  use 
makes  the  delight,  and  the  quantity  and  quality  of  their 
delight  is  according  to  uses. 

5620.  'A  little  resin  and  a  little  honey '  =  the  truths  of 
good  of  the  exterior  Natural,  and  its  delight. 

.  The  reason  '  honey '  —  delight,  is  that  it  is  sweet, 

and  everything  sweet  in  the  natural  man  corresponds  to 
delight  and  pleasantness  in  the  spiritual  man.  The 
reason  it  is  said  the  delight  of  truth  from  good  in  the 
exterior  Natural,  is  that  all  truth,  and  still  more  the 
truth  of  good,  has  its  own  delight,  but  delight  from  the 
affection  and  consequently  the  use  of  them. 

2.  That 'honey '  =  delight.  111. 

5.   'Honey,'  here,  —  the  pleasantness  and  delight 

from  the  affections  of  knowing  and  learning  celestial  and 
spiritual  goods  and  truths. 

6.   'To  suck  honey  out  of  the  rock '  =  delight  from 

scientific  truths. 

7.   'To  be  satisfied  with  honey  out  of  the  rock'  = 

delight  from  the  truths  of  faith. 

9.  'Flowing  with  honey'  =  the  abundance  of  happi- 
ness and  of  delights  (from  celestial  spiritual  things). 

10.   'Sweeter  than  honey  and  the  dropping  of  the 

combs '  =  delights  from  good  and  pleasantnesses  from 
truth. 

u.  The  manna  as  to  delight  and  pleasantness  is 


"DeYigllb-Jucundum 


85 


'Delight-J'itaiJidum 


described  by  its  taste  .  .  .  Taste  =  the  delight  of  good 
and  the  pleasantness  of  truth. 

12.  The  delight  of  the  literal  sense  is  signified  by 

'wild  honey.' 

13.  That  divine  truth  in  the  external  form  appears 

delightful,  is  signified  by  'the  flavoair  of  the  roll  being 
as  sweet  as  honey ; '  for  .  .  .  the  Word  in  the  external 
form  ...  is  delightful,  because  it  suffers  itself  to  be 
explained  in  everybody's  favour.  Ex.  .  .  It  must  be 
delightful  in  order  that  man  may  receive  it. 

15.  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  'honey'  =  the  delight 

which  is  from  good  and  truth,  or  from  the  affection  of 
them  ;  and  that,  specifically,  it= external  delight,  thus 
that  of  the  exterior  Natural.  As  this  delight  is  of  such 
a  nature,  that  it  comes  from  the  world  through  sensuous 
■things,  and  thus  contains  within  it  many  things  from 
the  love  of  the  world,  the  use  of  honey  was  forbidden  in 
the  meat-offerings. 

5639A  When  a  man  feels  delight  and  pleasantness 
within  him,  and  still  more  if  he  feels  joyousness  and 
blessedness  therefrom,  this  with  him  is  the  Spiritual, 
which  does  not  come  from  the  natural,  bat  from  the 
Spiritual  World  .  .  . 

5647.  There  is  also  a  fear  .  .  .  from  the  loss  of  freedom, 
and  with  freedom  the  delight  of  life.     . 

564s3.  Such  things  are  here  mentioned  in  the  internal 
sense  ...  as  are  pleasant  and  delightful  (to  those  who 
are  in  the  Spiritual  World) ;  but  the  more  interior  such 
things  are,  the  more  remote  they  are  from  the  under- 
standing of  the  men  to  whom  the  things  of  the  world 
and  the  body  are  alone  pleasant  and  delightful .  .  . 
Hence  may  be  evident,  what  a  difference  there  is  between 
the  delights  of  men  and  the  delights  of  the  Angels. 

56602.  (When  they  perceive  that  everything  flows  in), 
they  believe  that  their  own  proper  life  would  become 
nothing,  and  that  thus  all  delight  would  perish  ;  for 
this  they  place  in  what  is  their  Own. 

5670.  The  good  of  scientifics  is  the  delight  from  scien- 
tific truths. 

5722e.  Their  delight  in  doing  evil  is  so  great,  that 
nothing  is  more  delightful. 

5724e.  To  oppress  the  conscience  had  been  the  delight 
of  their  life. 

5732e.  This  he  does  .  .  .  who  feels  delight  and  blessed- 
ness in  doing  good  to  others  from  no  cause  of  self  .  .  . 

5864.  As  the  delight  and  blessedness  of  Heaven  is  to 
do  good  to  man,  and  contribute  to  his  eternal  salvation  ; 
so  .  .  .  the  delight  of  Hell  is  to  do  evil  to  man,  and  con- 
tribute to  his  eternal  destruction. 

588 ie.  This  commotion  .  .  .  manifests  itself  by  the 
deprivation  of  the  delight  there  had  been  in  the  former 
state. 

5992.  The  office  of  the  Angels  is  .  .  .  to  observe  whither 
man's  delights  turn  themselves,  and,  so  far  as  they 
can  from  man's  freedom,  to  moderate  and  bend  them  to 
good  ;  they  are  forbidden  to  act  violently  .  .  . 

e.  They  perceive  nothing  as  more  delightful  and 

happy  than  to  remove  evils  from  man,  and  lead  him  to 
Heaven. 

5993e.  Unless  man  were  led  according  to  the  delights 


of  his  life,  he  could  never  be  bent  towards  Heaven  ;  in 
the  beginning  he  is  bent  by  means  of  his  delights  them- 
selves ;  by  means  of  these  he  is  also  set  in  freedom,  and 
thus  at  last  in  choice. 

60244.  The  happiness  of  eternal  life,  and  the  delight 
of  the  affections,  and  their  doctrinal  things.  Sig. 

60732.  Uses  are  the  very  delights  of  life  of  the 
Angels  .  .  . 

60842.  The  delight  and  good  in  the  objects  are  what 
direct  the  (internal)  sight  thither. 

6i92e.  To  destroy  man  both  body  and  soul  is  the  very 
infernal  delight  itself. 

6203.  When  man  first  from  consent,  then  from  purpose, 
and  at  last  from  the  delight  of  affection  casts  himself 
into  evil,  the  Hell  is  opened  which  is  in  such  evil  .  .  . 
When  a  man  thus  comes  into  evil,  it  inheres  ;  for  the 
Hell,  in  the  sphere  of  which  he  then  is,  is  in  its  own  very 
delight  when  it  is  in  its  own  evil  .  .  . 

6388.  They  who  are  in  genuine  mutual  love,  are  in 
their  delight  and  blessedness  when  they  do  good  to 
the  neighbour  .  .  .  This  delight  and  this  blessedness,  is 
what  is  meant  by  'hire  ;'  for  the  delight  or  blessedness 
itself  is  the  hire  ;  and,  in  the  other  life,  it  becomes  the 
joy  and  happiness  which  are  in  Heaven  .  .  . 

63912.  (Such)  cannot  know  that  there  is  such  great 
happiness  in  doing  good  without  recompence  ;  the  reason 
is,  that  they  perceive  happiness  in  the  delight  of  self- 
love  ;  and  in  proportion  as  a  man  perceives  delight  in 
this  love,  he  does  not  perceive  delight  in  heavenly  love, 
for  they  are  opposite.  For  that  delight  which  flows 
from  self-love,  completely  extinguishes  the  delight  which 
is  from  heavenly  love,  until  it  is  utterly  unknown  what 
heavenly  delight  is  .  .  .  Evil  Spirits  ...  do  not  believe 
that  it  is  possible  for  any  delight  to  exist  in  doing  goods 
without  an  end  of  recompence ;  for  they  suppose  .  .  . 
that  all  delight  would  then  cease  ;  and  if  they  are  told, 
that  when  this  delight  ceases,  heavenly  delight  begins, 
they  are  amazed  ;  and  still  more  so  when  they  hear  that 
this  heavenly  delight  flows  in  through  the  inmost  of 
man,  and  affects  his  interiors  with  ineffable  happiness 
...  for  they  believe  that  if  they  were  to  lose  the  delight 
of  self-love,  they  would  be  most  miserable  .  .  . 

6408.  See  BLESS-Seare,  at  this  ref. 

6409.  '  His  bread  is  fat  '  =  delight  from  good  .  .  .  When 
'fat'  is  joined  to  'bread,'  which = the  good  of  love,  then 
'fat'  =  the  delight  which  is  of  that  love. 

6410.  The  reason  both  delight  from  good  and  pleasant- 
ness from  truth  are  mentioned,  is  on  account  of  the 
heavenly  marriage.     (See  Active  at  this  ref. ) 

64i4e.  After  temptations,  there  is  gladness  and  de- 
light. Kefs. 

6472s.  Thus  does  the  Lord  lead  man  according  to  his 
delights,  and  also  according  to  his  fallacies  .  .  . 

6484.  Heaven  inflowed  into  his  delight,  and  he  then 
suddenly  felt  Hell  .  .  . 

6495.  When  a  man  .  .  .  receives  influx  from  Hell,  he 
feels  the  life  of  the  love  of  self  and  the  world  delightful, 
and  the  life  of  the  love  of  the  neighbour,  except  for  the 
sake  of  self,  undelightful. 

6567s.  Affection  itself  and  thence  reason,  dominates, 


Delighk-fatundum 


86 


"Deligh.t-_fuatndum 


and  subjugates  in  the  Natural  the  delights  of  the  love 
of  self  and  the  -world  .  .  . 

[A.]  65742.  Theinfernals  .  .  .  are  then  in  their  own  life 
and  the  delight  of  their  life. 

6631.  Then  the  delights  of  earthly  loves  take  posses- 
sion of  the  whole  man,  and,  with  these,  all  the  evils 
which  are  delightful  to  him  from  these  loves  .  .  . 

66662.  All  the  delight  of  life,  thus  their  life  itself, 
consists  in  doing  evil. 

6S57.   'Flowing  with  milk  and  honey' =  and  thence 

pleasantness  and  delight.  .  .  '  Honey '  —  delight.     e. 

8056. 

69072.  (To  infest  those  who  are  in  truths)  is  then  the 
very  delight  of  their  life  ...  to  such  a  degree  are  they 
in  the  delight  of  life  from  falsities  .  .  .     70973.  4. 

697 12.  Believed  that  life  ought  to  be  made  delightful 
-jucundanda-hy  every  pleasure  .  .  . 

7002.  Pleasantness  and  delight  from  the  affection 
which  is  of  love.  Sig. 

e.  On  this  account,   they  attribute  to   doctrine 

pleasantness  and  delight  .  .  .  These  things  are  really  in 
doctrine  when  a  man  applies  it  to  himself,  because  in 
doctrine  is  Divine  truth  .  .  .  and  in  Divine  truth  love  ; 
thus  pleasantness  and  delight. 

7032.  By  these  words  is  signified  obstinacy  from  the 
will,  thus  from  the  delight  of  doing  evil  ;  for  what  is  of 
the  will  is  delightful,  and  what  is  delightful  is  from 
love. 

2.  The  reason  is,  that  the  delight  of  their  life  is 

to  do  evil ;  this  delight  they  derived  while  they  lived  in 
the  world,  from  loving  themselves  alone  .  .  .  Hence  they 
have  the  delight  of  doing  evil,  and  in  proportion  as  they 
are  in  this  delight,  they  are  in  obstinacy. 

70382.  The  (five)  senses  have  delights  entirely  accord- 
ing to  the  uses  which  they  perform.  The  most  delightful 
is  the  sense  of  marriage  love  .  .  .  Then  follows  the 
delight  of  taste,  which  has  such  delight  because  it 
serves  for  nourishment  and  health  .  .  .  The  delight  of 
smell  is  less  delightful,  because  it  only  serves  for  re- 
creation .  .  .  The  delight  of  hearing,  and  the  delight  of 
sight,  are  in  the  last  place,  because  they  only  receive 
the  things  which  are  to  serve  for  uses,  and  minister  to 
the  intellectual  part. 

7097e.  This  delight  of  life  (in  infesting)  is  increased 
by  exhortations  to  desist .  .  . 

7 1 88.  Their  only  delight  of  life  is  to  do  evil  and  in- 
fest, therefore  they  cannot  abstain  .  .  .  for  that  which  is 
the  delight  of  anyone's  life,  being  of  his  love  and  life, 
carries  him  away,  and  cannot  be  resisted,  unless  the 
undelight  of  punishment  prevails  over  the  delight  of 
doing  evil. 

728oe.  To  destroy  all  who  do  not  favour  them  is  the 
highest  delight  of  their  life  .  .  .  for  in  proportion  as 
anyone  is  in  hatred,  he  is  in  the  delight  of  destroying. 

7327.  When  falsity  begins  to  reign,  man  lives  accord- 
ing to  the  evil  innate  and  acquired,  and  feels  delight 
in  it. 

73522.  He  reasons  from  mere  falsities  .  .  .  who  believes 
that  man  has  nothing  but  the  delight  of  life  .  .  .  and 
therefore  that  he  should  enjoy  it. 


7356.  '  Into  thy  ovens,  and  into  thy  kneading- troughs ' 
=  into  the  delights  of  cupidities.  '  Ovens' = exterior 
goods,  which  are  those  in  the  Natural,  and  are  commonly 
called  delights  ;  for  when  interior  goods  .  .  .  flow  into 
the  Natural,  they  are  felt  there  as  delights.  .  .  In  the 
opposite,  '  oven '  =  the  delights  of  cupidities,  that  is, 
delights  from  the  loves  of  Hell.  .  .  'Kneading-troughs,' 
also  =  the  delights  of  cupidities  in  the  Natural,  but  still 
more  exterior  ones.  Ex. 

.  By  the  statement  that  reasonings  will  enter  into 

the  delights  of  cupidities,  is  meant  that  the  delight  of 
their  life  will  be  to  reason  from  falsities  .  .  . 

2.  That  'an  oven '  =  the  delight  of  the  affections 

of  charity  and  faith  ;  and,  in  the  opposite  sense,  the 
delight  of  the  cupidities  of  the  love  of  self  and  the 
world.  111. 

7363.  They  said  that  their  consociations  are  delight- 
ful ..  . 

7371.  The  delight  which  these  feel  in  such  things,  is 
the  delight  of  self-love :  this  delight  with  man  is 
infernal  delight.  Everything  which  takes  place  accord- 
ing to  the  love  is  delightful,  wherefore  the  nature  of 
the  love  may  be  known  from  the  delight. 

73922.  Nothing  deliglits-delectat-fhe  infernals  but  to 
do  evil  ...  for  to  do  evil  is  the  very  delight  of  their 
life  .  .  .  Infestation  by  falsities  is  delightful  to  them, 
because  thereby  they  can  do  evil ;  and  the  evil  of  the 
lice=the  evils  which  are  delightfvd  to  them  because 
they  are  evils.  In  the  other  life,  all  perceive  delight  in 
doing  evil,  who  in  the  world  do  not  do  good  to  the 
neighbour,  etc.  .  .  That  they  have  delight  in  doing  evil, 
does  not  shine  forth  in  the  world  .  .  .  but  in  the  other 
life  .  .  .  this  delight  manifests  itself. 

7396.  How  beautiful  and  delightful  would  then  be 
the  representation  of  an  empire,  kingdom,  and  society 
in  Heaven  .  .  . 

741 1.  That  there  was  no  longer  anything  undelightful 
(to  the  infesters).  Sig.  .  .  "What  is  delightful  makes  a 
man  breathe  freely  and  fully  ;  but  what  is  undelightful 
not  so. 

74372.  The  reason  why  they  who  are  in  evils  think  to 
falsities  ...  is  that  evils  are  the  very  delights  of  their 
life  .  .  . 

7501.  "When  evil  Spirits  attack  anyone,  they  know 
how  to  insinuate  themselves  into  his  delights  which  are 
of  cupidities,  and  also  into  his  pleasantnesses  which  are 
of  principles  ;  thus  into  the  things  of  his  love  ;  and  so 
long  .  .  .  they  hold  him  as  one  bound  .  .  .  for  love  and 
the  insinuation  into  the  delight  of  love  conjoin.  .  .  In 
the  world  (also)  he  who  insinuates  himself  into  another's 
delight  which  is  of  love,  holds  him  bound,  and  leads 
him. 

7S79.  The  Hells  are  most  fully  prepared  to  introduce 
evil ;  for  to  introduce  evil  is  the  very  delight  of  then- 
life. 

7967.  'Their  kneading-troughs  were  bound  up  in  their 
garments '  =  the  delights  of  the  affections  adhering  to 
truths.  .  .  (For)  all  the  truths  which  enter  into  man, 
are  conjoined  with  some  delight,  for  without  delight 
truths  have  no  life.  From  the  delights  which  are 
conjoined  with  truths,  it  is  known  how  it  is  with  the 


"Delight-fuamdum 


87 


"Delight-Juamdum 


truths  in  a  man  :  if  the  delights  are  of  evil  affections,  it 
is  evil ;  but  if  the  delights  are  of  good  affections,  it 
is  well.  Ex. 

8033.  Charity  .  .  .  consists  in  a  man's  wanting  to  do 
good  to  the  neighbour  from  the  heart,  and  that  this  is 
the  delight  of  his  life. 

8056.  Gladness  is  predicated  of  truth,  and  joy  of  good  ; 
in  like  manner,  pleasantness  and  delight. 

8293.  It  is  said  'My  soul  shall  be  filled,'  because  the 
delight  itself  of  those  who  are  in  Hell,  is  to  introduce 
evil  into  others,  with  some  for  no  other  end  than  for  the 
sake  of  the  delight.  .  .  That  there  is  such  a  delight 
with  those  in  the  other  life  who  are  in  evil  of  life, 
hardly  anyone  can  believe.  Ex.  .  .  But  when  reflections 
upon  the  loss  of  life,  wealth,  etc.,  are  taken  away  from 
them  .  .  .  then  the  delight  of  doing  evil,  which  lay 
hidden  in  the  will  .  .  .  manifests  itself.  This  delight 
then  constitutes  their  life,  which  is  infernal. 

83 1 82.  Thus  (by  self-love)  revenge  and  cruelty  become 
the  delight  of  their  life  .  .  .  But  with  those  who  are  in 
evil  from  the  love  of  the  world  ...  to  deprive  the 
neighbour  of  his  goods  is  the  delight  of  their  life  .  .  . 

8337s.  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  musical  instruments 
correspond  to  the  delights  and  pleasantnesses  of  spiritual 
and  celestial  affections. 

3.   'The  joy   of  timbrels '  =  the   delights  of  the 

affections  of  the  good  of  faith  ;  'the  joy  of  the  harp'  = 
the  delight  of  the  affection  of  the  truth  of  faith. 

8339.  'A  timbrel'  is  predicated  of  the  affection  of 
spiritual  good  .  .  .  and  =  its  delight  or  joy. 

8349.  All  the  delight  of  truth  comes  forth  from  good. 

S3522.  The  delight  of  life  of  the  spiritual  man  is  to  be 
instructed  in  truths  .  .  .  The  affection  of  good  is  con- 
tinually flowing  in  .  .  .  and  exciting  in  the  external 
things  suitable,  which  had  before  caused  the  delight  of 
the  affection  of  truth  ;  and  when  they  are  assaulted  by 
the  evils  of  the  love  of  self  and  the  world,  which  he  had 
before  perceived  as  delights,  there  arises  a  conflict  of 
delights  or  affections  .  .  . 

S356.  'The  waters  were  made  sweet' =  that  truths 
were  made  delightful.  '  Sweet  '  =  delightful ;  for,  in 
the  spiritual  sense,  'sweetness'  is  the  sweetness  of  life, 
which  is  one  with  delight.  .  .  Hence  it  is  evident,  that 
good  is  the  sole  cause  of  the  delight  of  the  affection  of 
truth  .  .  .  Hence  it  is,  that  so  long  as  good  flows  in  and 
is  received,  truth  appears  as  delightful ;  but  as  soon  as 
good  does  not  flow  in  .  .  .  at  once  instead  of  truth  there 
is  felt  undelight .  .  . 

8367.  After  every  spiritual  temptation  there  comes 
enlightenment  and  affection,  thus  pleasantness  and 
delight ;  pleasantness  from  enlightenment  by  truth,  and 
delight  from  the  affection  of  good.     2,I11. 

8369.  As  'palm-trees' =  goods,  they  also  =  the  affection 
of  good,  and  thence  delight ;  for  all  delight  is  from  the 
affection  of  good. 

837  8.  Hence  the  insanity  of  supposing  that  all  the 
delight  of  life  .  .  .  consists  in  luxury  and  pleasure. 

8403.  It  here  treats  of  the  third  temptation,  which  is 
on  account  of  the  lack  of  delight  and  of  good. 


3.  There  are  many  kinds  of  evil  which  made  the 

delight  of  the  former  or  old  life. 

8413.  That  they  were  expiring  from  a  lack  of  delight 
and  of  good.  Sig.  .  .  'To  kill '  =  to  deprive  of  life  ;  here, 
of  that  which  is  from  delight  and  from  good,  for  man's 
life  consists  in  these  things. 

2.  When  the  good  of  charity  is  to  be  insinuated 

.  .  .  the  delight  of  pleasures,  which  has  made  the  natural 
life,  is  removed  ;  when  this  delight  is  removed,  the  man 
comes  into  temptation  ;  for  he  believes  that  if  he  is 
deprived  of  the  delight  of  pleasures  he  will  be  deprived 
of  all  life  ;  for  his  natural  life  consists  in  this  delight  or 
good,  as  he  calls  it.  He  is  not  aware  that  when  this 
delight  of  life  is  removed,  spiritual  delight  and  good  is 
insinuated  by  the  Lord  in  its  place.  This  good  is  what 
is  signified  by  'the  manna' ;  the  former  good  or  delight, 
by  'the  flesh  and  bread  in  the  land  of  Egypt' ;  and  its 
deprivation,  by  '  hunger. '  But  it  is  to  be  well  observed, 
that  the  man  who  is  being  regenerated  is  not  deprived  of 
the  delight  of  the  pleasures  of  the  body  and  disposition  ; 
for,  after  regeneration,  this  delight  is  fully  enjoyed, 
more  fully  than  before,  but  in  an  inverted  way  :  before 
regeneration,  the  delight  of  pleasures  was  everything  of 
life,  but  after  regeneration  the  good  of  charity  becomes 
everything  of  life  ;  and  then  the  delight  of  pleasures 
serves  as  a  means  and  as  an  ultimate  plane,  in  which 
spiritual  good,  with  its  happiness  and  blessedness,  is 
terminated.  When,  therefore,  the  order  is  to  be  inverted, 
first  of  all  the  delight  of  pleasures  expires,  and  becomes 
nought,  and  what  is  new  from  a  spiritual  origin  is 
insinuated  in  its  place. 

84262.  When  it  is  evening,  (Spirits)  are  in  obscurity 
as  to  truths,  and  in  the  delight  of  natural  love  ;  this 
delight  is  what  is  signified  by  'the  quails,'  which  they 
received  in  the  evening. 

8431.  'In  the  evening  flesh  to  eat '  =  that  in  the  end 
of  the  state,  good  will  be  appropriated  by  means  of 
delight.  .  .  'Flesh,'  here,  =  the  good  of  the  natural  man, 
that  is,  delight.  .  .  '  Quails '  =  the  good  of  the  natural 
man,  which  is  called  delight.  .  .  That  which  is  given  in 
the  evening  =  natural  good,  or  delight.  .  .  Changes  thus 
succeed  .  .  .  that  man  may  appropriate  good,  which  is 
done  in  the  state  of  evening  by  means  of  delight. 

8452.  'The  quails  came  up'  =  the  natural  delight 
through  which  comes  good.  '  Quails '  =  natural  delight, 
(for)  a  sea  bird = what  is  natural ;  and  its  flesh,  which 
was  longed  for,  delight.  .  .  In  the  state  which  corre- 
sponds to  evening,  good  Spirits  and  Angels  are  let  into 
.  .  .  the  delights  of  their  natural  man,  in  order  that 
they  may  be  perfected  .  .  .  (for)  the  Natural  must  be 
accommodated  .  .  .  This  is  done  by  means  of  delights ; 
for  the  goods  which  are  of  the  natural  man  are  called 
delights,  because  they  are  felt. 

2.  A  sea  bird  and  its  flesh  =  natural  delight ;  and, 

in  the  opposite  sense,  the  delight  of  concupiscence.  111. 

3.  It  is  called  the  delight  of  concupiscence,  when 

the  delight  of  any  corporeal  or  worldly  love  is  dominant 
.  .  .  This  delight  is  what  is  described  (in  Num.  xi). 
But  the  natural  delight,  which  is  signified  in  this 
chapter  by  'the  quails,'  which  were  given  to  the  people 
in  the  evening,  is  not  the  delight  of  concupiscence,  but 
is  the  delight  of  the  natural  man  which  corresponds  to 


D  e\\gh.t-Jnaindinn 


88 


Delight  V' 


the  good  of  the  spiritual  man  :  this  delight  has  spiritual 
good  in  it ;  but  the  delight  of  concupiscence  has  infernal 
evil  in  it.  Both  are  called  delight,  and  both  are  felt  as 
delight ;  but  there  is  the  greatest  possible  difference 
between  them  ;  for  one  has  Heaven  in  it,  and  the  other 
has  Hell  in  it.     (Shown  by  a  comparison. ) 

[A.]  S455.  Dew  .  .  .  has  something  sweet  and  delight- 
ful stored  up  in  k  .  .  .  Peace  is  like  the  dawn  .  .  .  which 
gladdens  our  minds  with  a  universal  delight. 

2.  This  is  not  peace  ;  it  is  the  delight  and  tran- 
quillity of  cupidities  .  .  .  ;  but  as  this  delight  is  opposite 
to  the  delight  of  peace,  in  the  other  life  it  is  turned  into 
what  is  undelightful ;  for  such  lies  hidden  within  it 
.  .  .  Peace  is  the  inmost  in  every  delight,  even  in  the 
undelight  with  the  man  who  is  in  good. 

8462.  Before  regeneration,  he  believes  that  besides 
the  delights  of  the  love  of  self  and  of  the  world,  which 
he  calls  goods,  it  is  impossible  for  there  to  be  any  good 
.  .  .  and  if  anyone  should  say  to  him,  that  there  is  an 
interior  good  which  cannot  come  to  perception  so  long 
as  the  delights  of  the  love  of  self  and  the  world  are 
dominant ...  he  is  astounded  .  .  .  when  yet  this  good 
immensely  surpasses  the  delights  of  the  love  of  self  and 
the  world.  (Such)  believe  that  nothing  of  joy  and  life 
would  remain,  if  they  were  to  be  deprived  of  the  delights 
of  these  loves,  when  yet  heavenly  joy  then  begins. 

84$72.  As  every  delight  of  the  love  of  self  and  the 
world,  which  had  before  made  their  life,  extinguishes 
this  good  .  .  .  the  pure  good  of  truth  cannot  long  remain 
with  that  man,  but  it  is  tempered  by  the  Lord  by  means 
of  the  delights  of  the  loves  which  had  before  been  the 
delights  of  his  life  ;  for  unless  this  good  were  so  tem- 
pered, it  would  become  undelightful  to  him  ...  In 
proportion,  therefore,  as  the  delights  of  the  loves  of  self 
and  the  world  arise,  the  good  of  celestial  love  vanishes 
.  .  .  and  conversely.  Hence  in  Heaven  there  are  changes 
of  state,  and  by  turns  they  are  let  down  into  the  delights 
of  natural  pleasures  ;  for  (otherwise)  the  good  of  celestial 
love  would  become  dry  ;  but  it  is  different  when  it  is 
tempered  by  natural  delights,  either  at  once,  or  suc- 
cessively. Sig.  .  .  But  the  concupiscences  into  which  the 
Angels  are  let  down  .  .  .  are  the  delights  of  doing  good 
in  some  abundance  .  .  .  they  are  also  the  delights  of 
having  magnificent  houses,  etc.  .  .  According  to  the 
degree  in  which  a  man  is  being  regenerated  (such  things) 
become  the  ultimate  planes  of  celestial  good  ;  and  then 
they  are  no  longer  to  be  called  concupiscences,  but 
Delights. 

8522.  'Its  flavour  as  of  a  cake  in  honey '  =  that  good 
was  delightful,  like  that  which  was  made  good  from 
truth  by  means  of  delight.  'Flavour'  is  predicated  of 
the  delights  which  are  of  good,  because  it  corresponds 
to  the  delight  of  being  wise  .  .  .  and  '  honey  '= natural 
delight. 

e.  (Spiritual  good)  can  only  come  forth  by  means 

of  the  delights  which  are  of  the  natural  man  ;  by  means 
of  them  the  spiritual  man  is  introduced  ;  and  when  he 
has  been  introduced,  he  has  the  sense  thereof. 

8593.  The  highest  delight  of  the  life  (of  those  signi- 
fied by  'Amalek')  is  to  meditate  such  things  .  .  . 

8687e.  When  they  are  in  the  state  of  evening,  they 


are  in  natural  delight ;  but  when  in  the  state  of  morning, 
they  are  in  spiritual  delight. 

87012.  When  man  acts  from  the  affection  of  good,  he 
wills  good,  and  it  is  delight  and  blessedness  to  him  to 
do  it  .  .  . 

8707.  In  this  light  the  eye  sees  objects,  and  is  affected 
with  beauty  and  delight  from  their  agreements  with 
order  .  .  .  But  the  objects  seen  in  (spiritual)  light  appear 
beautiful  and  delightful  according  to  their  agreement 
with  a  man's  good. 

SS72e.  To  the  sensuous  Corporeal  relate  the  scientifics 
.  .  .  and  also  their  delights  :  with  the  good  these  are 
both  good,  because  they  are  applied  to  goods  ;  but  with 
the  evil  they  are  evil,  because  they  are  applied  to  evils. 

S9042.  Hence,  they  who  take  the  delight  of  their  life 
in  adulteries,  are  no  longer  able  to  receive  anything  of 
faith  .  .  . 

8977.  'If  he  shall  come  in  his  body'=:truth  without 
delight  .  .  .  for  'the  woman  of  a  servant '  =  the  delight 
conjoined  with  truth.  .  .  The  men  of  the  external  Church 
.  .  .  are  they  who  learn  truth  from  no  delight  .  .  . 

2.  But  they  who  are  in  the  truth  to  which  delight 

is  adjoined,  are  here  meant  by  'the  servants  who  come 
with  a  woman'  ;  for  'a  woman'  .  .  .  here,  =  delight ; 
because,  with  the  man  of  the  external  Church,  this  is  in 
the  place  of  good  :  the  good  which  he  has  is  .  .  .  from  a 
natural  origin  .  .  .  for  the  sake  of  self ;  this  is  why  it  is 
called  delight,  and  not  good  ...  As  it  is  natural  good, 
that  is,  as  it  derives  its  origin  from  the  world  ...  it  is 
called  delight. 

8978.  'He  shall  go  forth  in  his  body'  =  a  state  of 
truth  without  delight  also  after  combat. 

8979.  'If  he  is  the  lord  of  a  woman '  =  truth  conjoined 
with  delight.  .".  'A  woman '  =  good  ;  but  here,  delight. 
.  .  .  The  reason  'a  woman '  —  delight,  is  that  the  woman 
of  a  man  =  good  .  .  .  but  as  he  does  not  do  the  truth  for 
the  sake  of  the  truth,  nor  good  for  the  sake  of  good,  but 
that  he  may  be  recompensed  ;  in  the  truth  and  good  he 
does  there  is  the  idea  of  self,  and  this  idea  is  not  of 
good,  but  of  delight ;  for,  in  the  spiritual  sense,  nothing 
is  called  good  but  what  is  of  love  to  the  Lord  and 
towards  the  neighbour.  In  the  natural  man,  this  good 
also  does  indeed  appear  as  delight,  but  it  is  the  Spiritual 
within  it  which  makes  it  good.  Ex. 

S980.  'His  woman  shall  go  forthwith  him'  =  a  state 
of  truth  conjoined  with  delight  also  after  combat.  .  . 
'  Woman '  =  delight  conj  oined. 

.   '  Servants'  =  those  who  are  in  the  faith  of  the 

doctrinal  things  of  their  Church,  and  not  in  the  corre- 
sponding good,  but  in  the  delight  which  counterfeits  it, 
.  .  .  They  who  are  at  the  entrance  to  Heaven,  by  means 
of  the  truth  of  faith  communicate  with  those  who  are  in 
Heaven,  and  by  means  of  delight  conjoined  with  truth, 
with  those  who  are  outside  of  Heaven  .  .  . 

8986.  The  delight  of  the  remembrance  of  spiritual 
goods.  Sig.  .  .  'To  love,'  here, = the  delight  of  remem- 
brance .  .  .  Such  persons  cannot  be  affected  with  truth 
for  the  sake  of  good,  but  for  the  sake  of  delight ;  where- 
fore, as  'to  love'  is  here  said  of  such,  it = the  Delight  of 
remembrance. 

8987.  'I  will  not  go  out  free' =  the  delight  of 
obedience. 


D  Q\\gh.t-Jncim  dwn 


89 


D  eHigfab-faaindum 


.  To  be  reformed  (as  distinguished  from  to  be 

regenerated),  is  said  of  those  who,  by  the  truths  of  faith, 
cannot  be  brought  to  the  good  of  spiritual  life,  but  only 
to  the  delight  of  natural  life.  Ex. 

8993.  The  affection  of  truth  from  natural  delight. 
Sig.  .  .  Hence  '  the  daughter  of  a  man  sold  for  a  maid- 
servant' =  the  affection  of  truth  from  the  delight  of 
natural  affection.  By  natural  delight  is  meant  the 
delight  which  flows  forth  from  the  love  of  self  and  the 
the  world  .  .  .  Such  affections  of  truth,  which  do  not 
flow  forth  from  spiritual  good,  but  from  natural  delight, 
are  represented  by  'the  daughter  of  an  Israelitish  man 
sold  for  a  maid-servant'  .  .  . 

8995.  'If  she  be  evil  in  the  eyes  of  her  lord' =  if  the 
affection  of  truth  from  natural  delight  does  not  agree 
with  spiritual  truth.  '  Maid-servant '  =  affection  from 
natural  delight. 

2.   '  Maid-servant '  =  the  affection  of  truth  from  the 

delights  of  the  love  of  self  or  the  love  of  the  world  .  .  . 
The  affection  of  truth  from  natural  delight  is  in  the 
external  man  .  .  . 

4.  (Such  a  man)  may  suppose,  that  the  delight  of 

natural  loves,  which  are  the  love  of  self  and  the  world, 
cannot  agree  with  spiritual  truth  and  good,  (but  the 
fact  is  that)  man  has  his  head  in  Hell  when  he  has  the 
delights  of  the  love  of  self  or  the  world  as  an  end,  but 
he  has  it  in  Heaven,  when  these  delights  are  as  means 
to  an  end  .  .  . 

9049.  With  him  who  does  good  from  the  heart .  .  . 
the  affection  of  love  is  increased  .  .  .  and,  with  this 
affection,  an  ineffable  delight,  which  is  heavenly 
delight.  Ex. 

.  The  case  is  the  same  with  an  evil  man  who 

does  evil  to  another  from  the  heart  .  .  .  the  affection  of 
self-love  is  increased,  and  with  it  the  delight  of  hatred 
and  revenge  against  those  who  do  not  submit.  Ex. 

9103.  Exterior  good  is  charity  in  the  exterior  man  .  .  . 
this  good  comes  to  man's  sensation  as  delight ;  but 
(interior  good)  does  not  come  to  his  sensation  (except  in 
the  Spiritual  World). 

3.  The  objects  which  enter  through  the  senses, 

appear  to  man  at  fipst  as  pleasure  and  delight ;  after- 
wards, the  infant  man  distinguishes  between  the 
delights  .  .  . 

9184.  Unlawful  conjunction  ...  is  the  conjunction 
of  truth  with  affection  from  the  delight  of  gain  or  from 
the  delight  of  honours  ;  in  such  affection  are  they  who 
learn  the  truths  of  the  Church  for  the  sake  of  these 
delights  .  .  .  The  external  man  relishes  only  those 
things  which  are  of  the  world  and  self,  which  are 
delights  from  gains  and  honours.  But  when  the  inter- 
nal man  has  been  opened  .  .  .  the  man  regards  as  ends 
those  things  which  are  of  the  Lord  and  Heaven  .  .  .  and 
the  delights  of  gain  and  honours,  as  means  to  that  end. 
.  .  .  Means  have  life  solely  from  the  end  .  .  .  thus  the 
delights  of  gain  and  of  honours,  when  made  means, 
have  life  from  the  life  out  of  Heaven. 

92062.  As  it  is  with  good,  so  it  is  with  every  delight, 
pleasantness,  etc. ;  these  things  are  not  such  from  them- 
selves, but  from  the  things  which  are  in  them  ;  the 
conjunction  makes  them  such  .  .  . 


9213.  That  (scientific  truth)  is  to  be  restored  before  a 
state  of  shade  from  the  delights  of  external  loves.  Sig.  .  . 
'Sunset' =  a  state  of  shade  from  the  delights  of  external 
loves.  .  .  Sunset  in  Heaven  corresponds  to  a  state  of 
shade  as  to  the  truths  of  faith  and  of  cold  as  to  the 
good  of  love  ...  for  they  then  come  into  the  delights 
of  external  loves,  which  are  attended  with  shade  as  to 
faith  .  .  .  But  when  an  Angel  or  Spirit  is  in  internal 
things,  he  is  in  the  delights  and  blessednesses  of  heavenly 
loves,  and  at  the  same  time  in  the  pleasantnesses  of 
faith. 

2.  When  man  is  in  a  state  of  shade  from  the 

delights  of  external  loves,  as  these  delights  reject  those 
truths  .  .  .  fallacies  inhere  .  .  .  The  reason  external 
delights,  or  those  of  the  external  man,  are  such,  is  that 
they  cohere  with  the  world,  and  are  also  excited  and  as 
it  were  vivified  from  its  heat.  But  internal  delights  or 
blessednesses,  or  those  of  the  internal  man,  cohere  with 
Heaven,  and  are  also  excited  and  vivified  from  its  heat. 

9272s.  'To  plant  plants  of  delights'  (Is.xvii.io)  = 
such  things  as  favour  the  affections. 

9276.  Those  with  them  who  are  in  the  delights  of 
external  truth.  Sig.  .  .  The  subject  treated  of,  is  the 
conjunction  of  the  Church  .  .  .  with  those  who  are  in 
the  delights  of  external  truth.  .  .  'The  wild  beast  of 
the  field  '  =  those  who  are  in  the  delights  of  external 
truth;  (for)  'wild  beasts '  =  such  affections  as  are  of 
truth  the  most  external ;  for  these  affections  .  .  .  are 
the  affections  of  sensuous  things,  which  are  called 
pleasures  and  Delights.  The  reason  they  are  the 
Delights  of  truth,  and  not  so  much  of  good,  is  that 
sensuous  things  .  .  .  derive  hardly  anything  from 
spiritual  good. 

2.  This  verse  treats  (thirdly)  of  those  who  are  in 

the  delights  of  external  truth  :  these  three  kinds  of  men 
constitute  the  Church  .  .  .  they  who  are  in  the  delights 
of  external  truth  are  the  outermost,  and  make  as  it 
were  the  circuit,  and  close  the  Church.  .  .  (Through  the 
first  two  kinds  of  men)  the  Lord  is  with  those  who  are 
in  the  delights  of  external  truth  ;  for  these  delights 
with  them  are  for  the  most  part  from  the  loves  of  self 
and  the  world,  and  derive  very  little  from  spiritual 
good. 

4.  Through   this   affection,    He   flows   into    the 

delights  of  external  truth,  which  are  in  the  extremes. 

9278.  'Six  days  thou  shalt  do  thy  works'  =  a  state  of 
labour  and  combat,  when  in  the  external  delights  which 
are  to  be  conjoined  with  internal  ones. 

92962.  In  proportion  as  he  is  carried  away  by  the 
delights  of  the  loves  of  self  and  the  world  .  .  . 

92974.  All  in  the  other  life  are  reduced  to  .  .  .  the 
use  of  their  life  .  .  .  which  they  had  loved  above  all 
things,  and  which  had  therefore  been  the  delight  itself 
of  their  life. 

9335.  'Lest  the  wild  beast  of  the  field  be  multiplied 
upon  thee  '  =  the  afflux  of  falsities  from  the  delights  of 
the  loves  of  self  and  the  world.  .  .  'Wild  beasts '  =  the 
affections  of  falsity  originating  from  the  delights  of  the 
loves  of  self  and  the  world. 

2.  From  these  fallacies,  when  they  breathe  the 

delights  of  the  loves  of  self  and  the  world,  he  concludes 
nothing  but  falsities  .  .  . 


"Delight-faa/ndum 


90 


D  elight-facu  ndum 


[A.  ]  9341.  '  From  the  wilderness  to  the  river '  =  from  the 
delight  of  the  Sensuous  to  the  good  and  truth  of  the 
Rational.  .  .  As  the  Sensuous  has  no  celestial  good  or 
spiritual  truth,  but  delight  and  pleasure  from  the  body 
and  the  world,  'wilderness'  here  =  this  Outermost  in  the 
man  of  the  Church. 

9348.  The  loves  of  self  and  the  world  are  connate 
with  man,  and  from  them  man  feels  the  delight  of  his 
life  from  his  birth  ;  yea,  from  them  he  has  his  life. 

2.   'The  pit'  =  falsity  induced  by  reasonings  from 

the  fallacies  of  the  senses  to  favour  the  delights  of  the 
loves  of  self  and  the  world. 

4.   'To  spread  over  him  a  net'=to  allure  by  the 

delights  of  earthly  loves  and  reasonings  thence. 

6.    'A  snare '  =  allurement  and  deception  through 

the  delights  of  the  loves  of  self  and  the  world  .  .  .  and 
this  through  reasonings  from  the  fallacies  of  the  senses, 
which  favour  these  delights  .  .  .  The  diabolical  crew 
assault  nothing  with  man  but  these  loves,  which  they 
delight  in  every  way,  until  he  is  taken  ;  (and  then  the 
man)  also  takes  delight  in  ensnaring  and  alluring 
others  .  .  . 

7.  The  delights  of  these  loves  are  what  destroy 

.  .  .  for  from  self-love  streams  out  contempt  for  others 
.  .  .  enmity  if  they  do  not  favour ;  at  last  the  delight 
of  hatred,  the  delight  of  revenge,  thus  the  delight  of 
fierceness  ;  nay,  of  cruelty. 

9449.  The  signs  that  sins  are  forgiven,  are  .  .  .  they 
perceive  delight  in  worshipping  God  for  the  sake  of 
God,  in  serving  the  neighbour  for  the  sake  of  the  neigh- 
bour ;  thus  in  doing  good  for  the  sake  of  good,  and  in 
believing  truth  for  the  sake  of  truth  ... 

9450.  The  signs  that  sins  are  not  forgiven,  are  .  .  . 
they  perceive  delight  in  evils.  Enum. 

9585.  Everything  is  called  freedom  which  is  ...  of 
love  ;  hence  it  is,  that  freedom  manifests  itself  by  the 
delight  of  willing  and  thinking,  and  thence  of  doing 
and  speaking  ;  for  all  delight  is  of  love. 

99932.  The  external  (of  the  Celestial  Kingdom)  is  the 
delight  proceeding  from  this  good  .  .  .  this  is  in  the 
external  man  with  them  .  .  .  and  is  represented  by  '  the 
unleavened  wafers  anointed  with  oil.' 

9996.  The  ultimate  of  the  Voluntary  is  called  sensuous 
delight ;  (this)  is  drawn  in  through  the  senses  of  taste 
and  touch  .  .  .  and  is  meant  by  'a  basket;'  (for)  the 
ultimate  is  the  containant  of  all  interior  things. 

100292.  Truth  in  the  natural  man  is  what  is  scientific, 
and  good  there  is  the  delight  thereof;  and  both  are 
perceptible  to  man  .  .  . 

10170.  The  delight  of  love  truly  conjugial  is  internal, 
being  of  minds  ;  and  is  also  the  external  delight  thence, 
which  is  of  bodies :  but  the  delight  of  love  not  truly 
conjugial  is  a  mere  external  delight  without  an  internal 
one  .  .  .  this  delight  is  earthly  .  .  .  and  therefore  in 
time  perishes  ;  whereas  the  former  is  heavenly  .  .  .  and 
therefore  permanent. 

102367.  The  good  of  the  Sensuous,  signified  by  'a 
base  of  brass,'  is  what  is  called  the  pleasure  and  delight 
which  affects  the  imaginative  thought .  .  .  and  is  dis- 
tinguished from  other  delights  by  this,  that  it  regards 


no  uses  but  those  for  the  sake  of  self;  for  the  sensuous 
man  is  in  the  love  of  self  and  the  world,  and  his  delights 
are  those  of  these  loves. 

10402.  'Ear-rings  of  gold  in  the  ears '  =  representative 
insignia  of  obedience  and  of  perception  of  the  delights 
which  are  of  external  loves  ;  for  'gold'  .  .  .  here,  =  the 
delight  of  external  loves  .  .  .  thus  evil. 

10407.  'He  made  it  a  calf  of  what  is  molten  ^accord- 
ing to  the  delight  of  the  loves  of  that  nation  ...  for  'a 
calf,'  as  an  idol,  =  this  delight. 

2.  When  there  is  no  good  of  innocence  and  of 

charity  ...  'a  calf  =  natural  and  sensuous  delight ; 
which  delight  is  the  delight  of  pleasures,  of  cupidities, 
and  of  the  loves  of  self  and  the  world  ;  this  delight  is 
that  in  which  are  they  who  are  in  externals  without 
what  is  internal ;  and  they  worship  it. 

10503.  'They  have  made  themselves  gods  of  gold'  = 
they  worship  infernal  delight.  .  .  ' Gold' =  the  delight 
of  external  loves,  thus  infernal  delight. 

10530.  'To  a  land  flowing  with  milk  and  honey' = 
pleasantness  and  delight  from  the  good  of  faith  and  of 
love  ...  It  is  said  pleasantness  and  delight  from  these, 
because  in  the  good  of  faith  and  of  love  there  is  heavenly 
pleasantness  and  delight  itself ;  for  all  good  has  its  own 
delight ;  since  that  is  called  good  which  is  loved,  and 
all  delight  is  of  love.  The  delight  which  is  meant  by 
heavenly  joy  and  eternal  happiness,  is  from  no  source 
but  the  love  of  truth  and  good.  That  this  delight  is 
above  every  delight  of  any  love  in  the  world,  is  quite 
unknown  to  those  who  place  all  delight  in  worldly, 
corporeal,  and  earthly  things. 

106182.  All  evil  has  in  it  enmity,  hatred,  revenge, 
and  fierceness  ;  in  and  from  these  evil  has  its  delight  ; 
and,  moreover,  evil  hates  good,  because  this  is  opposite 
to  its  delights. 

10742.  These  things  (hatred,  revenge,  etc.)  at  last 
become  the  delights  of  their  life,  thus  the  loves.     10745. 

H.  562.  See  Beauty  at  this  ref. 

112  (q).  Every  good  has  its  own  delight  from  and 
according  to  uses.  Refs. 

155.  "When  (the  Angels)  are  in  the  greatest  degree  of 
love,  they  are  in  the  light  and  heat  of  their  life,  that  is, 
in  their  clearness  and  delight;  but  when  they  are  in 
the  least,  they  are  in  shade  and  cold,  that  is,  in  their 
obscurity  and  undelight. 

158.  The  first  (reason  why  there  are  changes  of  state 
in  Heaven)  is  that  the  delight  of  life  and  of  Heaven, 
which  they  have  from  love  and  wisdom  .  .  .  would  by 
degrees  become  cheap,  if  they  were  constantly  in  it. 

2.  The  third  reason  is  .  .  .  that   the   perception 

and  sensation  of  good  becomes  more  exquisite  by  the 
alternations  of  delight  and  undelight. 

249.  To  speak  with  Spirits  ...  is  dangerous  .  .  .  for 
evil  Spirits  .  .  .  desire  nothing  more  than  to  destroy 
man  soul  and  body,  which  also  is  done  with  those  who 
have  indulged  much  in  phantasies,  until  they  have 
removed  from  themselves  the  delights  which  are  suitable 
to  the  natural  man. 

266e.  The  Angels  are  gifted  with  delights  and  pleasant- 
nesses according  to  the  reception  of  wisdom  from  the 
Lord. 


"Delight-Jucunditm 


91 


Deligh.t-faat"rf"> 


282e.  When  an  Angel  of  the  inmost  Heaven  approaches, 
he  (who  feels  it)  seems  ...  to  be  affected  and  as  it  were 
carried  away  with  such  delight,  that  in  comparison  with 
it  every  delight  of  the  world  appears  to  be  nothing. 

285.  Innocence  is  that  from  which  is  all  the  good  of 
Heaven,  and  peace  is  that  from  which  is  all  the  delight 
of  that  good.  Every  good  has  its  own  delight,  and 
good  and  delight  are  both  of  love  ;  for  whatever  is 
loved  is  called  good,  and  is  also  perceived  as  delight.  .  . 
That  peace  is  the  inmost  of  delight  from  the  good  of 
innocence,  shall  now  be  explained.     2882. 

288.  The  peace  of  Heaven  .  .  .  does  not  come  to  their 
manifest  perception,  except  by  a  Delight  of  heart  when 
they  are  in  the  good  of  then-  life,  and  by  a  pleasant- 
ness when  they  hear  truth  which  agrees  with  their  good, 
and  by  a  cheerfulness  of  mind  when  they  perceive  their 
conjunction  .  .  . 

2.  Innocence  and  peace  are  conjoined  like  good 

and  its  delight ;  for  good  is  felt  by  its  delight,  and 
delight  is  Known  from  its  good.  .  .  That  innocence  and 
peace  are  together,  like  good  and  its  delight,  may  be 
seen  with  little  children  .  .  . 

289.  "When  the  conjunction  of  good  and  truth  comes 
forth,  as  is  especially  the  case  after  temptations,  he 
comes  into  a  state  of  delight  from  heavenly  peace. 

374.  I  heard  an  Angel  describing  love  truly  conjugial 
and  its  heavenly  Delights,  in  this  way  .  .  .  Hence  it  is 
that  all  things  of  Heaven  are  inscribed  on  this  love,  and 
so  many  blessednesses  and  Delights  as  to  exceed  all 
number  ...  In  the  spiritual  sense,  the  delight  of  adul- 
teries is  nothing  but  the  delight  of  the  love  of  falsity 
conjoined  with  evil,  which  delight  is  infernal  delight, 
because  entirely  opposite  to  the  delight  of  Heaven, 
which  is  the  delight  of  the  love  of  truth  conjoined 
with  good. 

3792.  Even  those  who  are  in  (genuine  marriage  love), 
know  nothing  whatever  about  the  interior  delight  which 
is  in  this  love,  but  only  about  the  delight  of  lascivious- 
ness,  which  delight  is  turned  into  undelight  after  a 
short  cohabitation  ;  whereas  the  delight  of  love  truly 
conjugial  not  only  lasts  till  old  age  in  the  world,  but 
also  becomes  the  delight  of  Heaven  after  death,  and  is 
then  infilled  with  interior  delight,  which  is  perfected  to 
eternity. 

382.  Among  married  partners  who  are  in  love  truly 
conjugial,  there  are  heavenly  delights,  which  are  before 
their  minds  almost  like  the  sports  of  innocence  .  .  .  for 
there  is  nothing  that  does  not  delight  their  minds. 

384.  This  is  why  when  a  man  commits  adultery  from 
delight,  Heaven  is  closed  to  him. 

2.  From  this  it  was  evident,   that  the  delight 

which  reigns  in  Hell  is  the  delight  of  adultery,  and  that 
the  delight  of  adultery  is  also  the  delight  of  destroying 
the  conjunction  of  good  and  truth  .  .  .  Hence  it  follows, 
that  the  delight  of  adultery  is  an  infernal  delight  which 
is  entirely  opposite  to  the  delight  of  marriage,  which  is 
a  heavenly  delight. 

386.  It  has  been  shown  me  how  the  delights  of 
marriage  love  advance  towards  Heaven,  and  the  delights 
of  adultery  towards  Hell.  Ex. 

395.  The  reason  it  is  not  known  what  heavenly  joy 


is  .  .  .  is  that  they  have  not  known  what  the  internal 
man  is,  thus  not  what  is  his  delight  and  blessedness  .  .  . 

2.  Hence  it  may  be  known,  that  heavenly  delight 

is  internal  and  spiritual  delight,  but  not  external  and 
natural  delight ;  and  because  it  is  internal  and  spiritual, 
it  is  more  pure  and  exquisite,  and  affects  the  interiors  of 
man  .  .  .  Everyone  may  hence  conclude,  that  his  delight 
is  such  as  the  delight  of  his  spirit  has  been  ;  and  that 
the  delight  of  the  body,  which  is  called  the  delight  of 
the  flesh,  is  relatively  not  heavenly  ;  and  what  is  in 
man's  spirit .  .  .  remains  after  death. 

396.  All  delights  flow  forth  from  love  ;  for  what  a 
man  loves  he  feels  delight  ;  nor  has  anyone  delight 
from  any  other  source  ;  hence  it  follows  that  such  as  the 
love  is,  such  is  the  delight.  The  delights  of  the  body 
or  flesh  all  flow  forth  from  the  love  of  self  and  the  love 
of  the  world  ;  hence  they  are  concupiscences  and  their 
pleasures  ;  but  the  delights  of  the  soul  or  spirit  all  flow 
forth  from  love  to  the  Lord  and  love  towards  the  neigh- 
bour ;  hence  also  they  are  affections  of  good  and  truth, 
and  are  interior  joyousnesses.  These  loves  with  their 
delights  inflow  from  the  Lord  and  out  of  Heaven 
through  an  internal  way  .  .  .  and  affect  the  interiors  ; 
whereas  the  former  loves  with  their  delights  inflow  from 
the  flesh  and  the  world  through  an  external  way  .  .  . 
and  affect  the  exteriors. 

e.  As  loves  flow  in  and  are  received,  so  at  the 

same  time  their  delights  also  flow  in  ;  into  the  interiors 
the  delights  of  Heaven,  into  the  exteriors  the  delights 
of  the  world  ;  since,  as  was  said,  all  delight  is  of  love. 

397.  Heaven  in  itself  is  such,  that  it  is  full  of  delights  ; 
insomuch  that  regarded  in  itself  it  is  nothing  but 
blessedness  and  delight  ... 

398.  The  delights  of  Heaven  are  ineffable,  and  are 
also  innumerable  ;  but  of  these  innumerable  delights 
not  one  can  be  known  or  believed  by  him  who  is  in  the 
mere  delight  of  the  body  or  flesh  .  .  .  For  he  who  is 
wholly  in  the  delight  of  the  body  or  flesh  ;  or,  what  is 
the  same,  in  the  love  of  self  and  the  world  ;  feels  nothing 
of  delight  except  in  honours,  gain,  and  the  pleasures  of 
the  body  .  .  .  which  so  extinguish  and  suffocate  the 
interior  delights  which  are  of  Heaven,  that  they  are  not 
believed  to  be.  Wherefore  he  would  marvel  greatly,  if 
he  were  told  that  there  are  delights  existing  after  the 
removal  of  the  delights  of  honours  and  gain,  and  still 
more  if  told  that  the  delights  of  Heaven  which  succeed 
in  their  place  are  innumerable,  and  such  that  the 
delights  of  the  body  and  flesh,  which  are  chiefly  the 
delights  of  honours  and  gain,  cannot  be  compared 
with  them. 

399.  How  great  the  delight  of  Heaven  is,  may  be 
manifest  only  from  this,  that  it  is  delight  to  all  there  to 
communicate  their  own  delights  and  blessednesses  to 
another ;  (hence)  it  is  evident  how  immense  is  the 
delight  of  Heaven.  .  .  The  loves  of  Heaven  are  com- 
municative of  their  delights  .  .  .  hence  there  is  a  mutual 
communication  of  the  delights  of  the  Angels  among 
each  other  ...  But  self-love  takes  away  all  delight  from 
others,  and  draws  it  into  itself .  .  .  Wherefore,  these 
loves  are  destructive  of  the  delights  with  others  .  .  . 
they  are  not  communicative,  but  destructive,  except  in 
so  far  as  the  delights  of  others  appertain  to  themselves. 


"Delight-Jucu/idum 


92 


Delight-fua/ndum 


.  .  .  Whenever  Spirits  in  these  loves  .  .  .  approached, 
my  delight  receded  and  vanished.  .  .  If  such  merely 
approach  any  heavenly  Society,  the  delight  of  those 
who  are  in  the  Society  is  diminished  .  .  .  and  those  evil 
Spirits  are  then  in  their  delight.  .  .  Hence  it  is  evident 
that  the  spirit  of  such  a  man  .  .  .  covets  the  delights  or 
goods  of  another  ;  and  in  proportion  as  he  ohtains  them, 
he  has  delight. 

[H.]  400.  But .  .  .  the  delight  in  -which  they  are  who 
are  in  the  loves  of  self  and  the  world  when  they  approach 
any  heavenly  Society,  is  the  delight  of  then1  own  concu- 
piscence ;  thus  is  quite  opposite  to  the  delight  of 
Heaven  ;  they  come  into  the  delight  of  their  own  con- 
cupiscence from  the  deprivation  and  removal  of  heavenly 
delight  with  those  who  are  in  it.  .  .  But  when  there  is 
no  deprivation  .  .  .  they  cannot  approach  .  .  . 

3.  Such  (torture)  heavenly  delight  produced  upon 

those  who  were  in  delights  from  the  love  of  self  and  the 
world  ...  As  heavenly  delight  enters  through  an  in- 
ternal way,  and  flows  into  the  contrary  delight,  it 
twists  backwards  the  interiors  which  are  in  that  delight, 
thus  into  what  is  opposite  to  themselves  ;  hence  such 
tortures  .  .  . 

4.  All  in  Hell  have  been  ...  in  the  mere  delights 

of  the  body  and  flesh  from  the  love  of  self  and  the  world  ; 
whereas  all  in  Heaven  have  been  ...  in  the  delights  of 
the  soul  and  spirit  from  love  to  the  Lord  and  towards 
the  neighbour. 

401.  A  man  in  the  love  of  self  and  the  world  feels 
delight  from  these  loves,  and  also  in  every  pleasure  from 
them,  while  he  lives  in  the  body  ;  whereas  a  man  in  love 
to  God  and  towards  the  neighbour,  does  not  manifestly 
feel  delight  from  them,  and  from  the  good  affections 
from  them,  so  long  as  he  lives  in  the  body  ;  but  only  a 
blessedness  almost  imperceptible  .  .  .  But,  after  death, 
the  states  are  completely  changed  ;  the  delights  of  the 
love  of  self  and  the  world  are  then  turned  into  what  is 
painful  and  direful  .  .  .  and  by  turns  into  what  is  filthy 
and  squalid  .  .  .  which  are  then  delightful  to  them. 
But  the  obscure  delight,  and  almost  imperceptible  bless- 
edness ...  is  then  turned  into  the  delight  of  Heaven, 
which  is  in  every  way  perceptible  and  sensible  .  .  .  for 
they  are  then  in  the  spirit,  and  this  was  the  delight  of 
their  spirit. 

402.  All  the  delights  of  Heaven  are  conjoined  with 
and  are  [in  uses  .  .  .  wherefore,  everyone  has  delights 
such  as  the  uses  are,  and  also  in  such  a  degree  as  is  the 
affection  of  use.  That  all  the  delights  of  Heaven  are 
delights  of  use,  may  be  evident  from  a  comparison  with 
the  five  senses  ...  To  each  sense  there  is  given  delight 
according  to  its  use  ...  To  the  sight,  delight  from 
beauty  and  forms ;  to  the  hearing,  from  harmonies ;  to 
the  smell,  from  things  odoriferous  ;  to  the  taste,  from 
flavours.  .  .  The  reason  sight  has  such  a  delight,  is  from 
the  use  it  performs  to  the  understanding  .  .  .  The  reason 
hearing  has  such  a  delight,  is  from  the  use  it  performs 
to  both  the  understanding  and  the  will.  The  reason 
smell  has  such  a  delight,  is  from  the  use  it  performs  to 
the  brain  and  also  to  the  lungs.  The  reason  taste  has 
such  a  delight,  is  from  the  use  it  performs  to  the 
stomach  and  thence  to  the  universal  body.  .  .  The 
marriage  delight,  which  is  a  purer  and  more  exquisite 


delight  of  touch,  is  more  excellent  than  all  the  former, 
on  account  of  its  use,  which  is  the  procreation  of  the 
human  race,  and  thence  of  the  Angels  of  Heaven.  These 
delights  are  in  these  sensories  from  the  influx  of  Heaven, 
where  every  delight  is  of  use  and  according  to  use. 

404e.  Heavenly  joy  ...  is  conjoined  with  ineffable 
Delight. 

4052.  In  no  case  (in  the  Heavens)  is  the  use  of  one 
exactly  the  same  as  that  of  another  ;  thus  neither  is  the 
delight  of  one  exactly  the  same  as  that  of  another  .  .  . 
The  delights  of  every  use  are  innumerable,  and  these 
innumerable  delights  are  in  like  manner  various,  but 
still  conjoined  together  in  such  order,  that  they  mutually 
regard  each  other.  Ex. 

4062.  For  the  delight  of  those  in  the  Heavens  is  to  do 
good  to  another  ;  and  it  is  not  delight  to  do  good  to 
themselves,  except  that  it  may  become  another's  .  .  . 

409.  Heavenly  joy  ...  is  as  if  the  interiors  were  fully 
opened  and  unloosed  to  receive  delight  and  blessed- 
ness, which  is  dispersed  into  every  single  fibre.  Des. 
Good  Spirits  who  are  not  yet  in  this  delight  .  .  .  when 
they  perceive  it  from  an  Angel  .  .  .  are  filled  with  such 
delight,  that  they  go  as  it  were  into  a  sweet  swoon. 

413.  It  has  often  been  granted  me  to  perceive  the 
Delights  of  heavenly  joys  ...  It  is  an  affection  of 
innumerable  Delights  and  joys.  Des. 

e.  "When  I  wanted  to  transfer  all  my  delight  into 

another,  a  more  interior  and  fuller  delight  than  the 
former  one  continually  flowed  in  in  its  place  ;  and  in 
proportion  as  I  wanted  this,  so  it  flowed  in  ;  aud  I 
perceived  that  this  was  from  the  Lord. 

4142.  Goodness  .  .  .  makes  the  delight  and  beauty  of 
charity  to  shine  forth  from  every  particle  of  their 
faces  .  .  . 

485.  The  delights  of  everyone's  life  are  after  death 
turned  into  corresponding  ones.  Gen.  art. 

.  By  being  turned  into  corresponding  delights,  is 

meant  into  spiritual  ones  which  correspond  to  the  natural 
ones  .  .  .     487, Ex.  489, Ex.,  and  Examps.  given. 

4S6.  All  the  delights  man  has,  are  of  his  reigning 
love  ;  for  man  feels  nothing  else  delightful  but  what  he 
loves,  thus  especially  what  he  loves  above  all  things  .  .  . 
These  delights  are  various  ;  they  are  as  many  in  general 
as  there  are  reigning  loves,  consequently,  as  many  as 
there  are  men,  Spirits,  and  Angels  .  .  .  The  specific 
delights  of  every  man  are  also  of  infinite  varietyj;  nor  is 
there  a  single  delight  of  any  man  quite  like  that  of 
another,  whether  they  succeed  one  after  another,  or  are 
together  one  with  another  .  .  .  But  still  these  specific 
delights  with  everyone  relate  to  his  reigning  love ;  for 
they  compose  it,  and  thus  make  one  with  it.  In  like 
manner  all  delights  in  general  relate  to  one  universally 
reigning  love  ;  in  Heaven  to  love  to  the  Lord,  and  in 
Hell  to  self-love. 

487s.  These  things  are  said  to  the  end  that  man  may 
examine  himself,  and  from  his  delights  may  Know  his 
love  .  .  . 

4897.  (With)  those  who  have  reputed  adulteries  as 
wicked,  and  have  lived  in  chaste  love  of  marriage  .  .  . 
the  delights  of  their  love  are  ineffable,  and  they  increase 
to  eternity  ;  for  all  the  delights  and  joys  of  Heaven  flow 


'Delight-fucundui 


93 


TDe\igh.t-fuai/tdu) 


into  this  love  .  .  .  Their  external  delights  are  such  that 
they  cannot  be  described  in  human  words. 

500.  By  will,  is  meant  the  affection  and  love,  also  all 
the  delight  and  pleasure  which  are  of  the  affection  and 
love  .  .  .  since  what  a  man  wills  he  loves,  and  feels  to 
be  delight  and  pleasure  ;  and,  conversely,  what  a  man 
loves,  and  feels  to  be  delight  and  pleasure,  he  wills. 

517.  (a).  All  good  has  its  delight  from  and  according 
to  uses.  Refs. 

570.  Infernal  fire  ...  is  also  Delight  ;  for  what  a 
man  loves  or  desires,  he  feels  delight  when  he  obtains 
it ;  from  no  other  source  has  man  delight  of  heart.  In- 
fernal fire,  therefore,  is  the  cupidity  and  delight  which 
stream  forth  from  these  two  (infernal)  loves  as  from 
their  origins. 

.  Therefore  it  is  the  delight  of  their  life  to  want 

to  destroy  and  kill  .  .  . 

5732.  From  delight  he  rages  against  those  who  do  not 
submit :  this  delight  is  completely  conjoined  with  the 
delight  of  command  .  .  .  for  the  delight  of  doing  harm 
is  in  enmity,  hatred,  etc. 

574.  When  this  sphere  (from  Hell)  is  perceived  by 
him  who  is  in  a  like  cupidity,  he  is  affected  at  heart, 
and  infilled  with  delight ;  for  cupidity  and  its  delight 
make  one  ;  for  what  anyone  desires  is  delight  to  him. 
Hence  it  is,  that  the  Spirit .  .  .  from  delight  of  heart 
desires  to  go  thither. 

N.  58.  Everyone  has  all  his  delight,  joyousness, 
and  happiness  from  his  dominant  love,  and  according  to 
it ;  for  man  calls  that  delight  which  he  loves,  because 
he  feels  it ;  but  that  which  he  thinks  and  does  not  love, 
he  may  also  call  delight,  but  it  is  not  the  delight  of  his 
life.  The  delight  of  love  is  that  which  is  good  to  a 
man  ;  and  undelight  is  evil  to  him. 

J.  56s.  (The  Papists)  there  dispose  around  them  a 
number  of  Societies,  which  are  in  various  external  de- 
lights. Enum.  .  .  But  after  being  there  a  few  hours, 
they  are  all  wearied,  and  depart,  because  these  delights 
are  external,  and  not  internal. 

S.  108.  (African  Spirits  heard  the  singing  of  a  Psalm 
in  a  church)  from  which  they  were  affected  with  such 
Delight,  that  they  sang  along  with  them.  Presently, 
their  ears  were  closed  .  .  .  and  then  they  were  affected 
with  a  still  greater  Delight,  because  a  spiritual  one  .  .  . 
The  reason  of  their  increased  Delight,  was  that  com- 
munication was  given  them  with  that  Society  in  Heaven, 
which  was  in  conjunction  with  those  who  were  singing 
that  Psalm.     De  Verbo  182. 

W.  33.  Affection  and  thought  are  the  fountains  of 
man's  life  ;  all  the  delights  and  pleasantnesses  of  his 
life  are  from  them  ;  the  delights  from  the  affection  of 
his  love,  and  the  pleasantnesses  from  the  thought  thence. 

47.  The  essence  of  all  love  consists  in  conjunction  ; 
yea,  its  life,  which  is  called  delight,  pleasantness,  de- 
liciousness,  sweetness,  blessedness,  joyousness,  and 
happiness.  Love  consists  in  this,  that  its  own  is 
another's,  and  that  it  feels  his  delight  as  delight  in  its 
own  self .  .  .  but  to  feel  one's  own  delight  in  another, 
and  not  his  in  ourselves,  is  not  to  love  .  .  . 

267.  (The  reason  he  does  not  elevate  his  understand- 


ing higher)  is  that  he  is  in  the  delights  of  the  love  of 
his  natural  mind,  and  if  he  rises  above  it,  the  delight  of 
his  love  perishes  :  if  it  is  elevated  higher,  and  sees  truths 
opposite  to  the  delights  of  his  life  ...  he  either  falsifies 
them,  or  passes  them  by  .  .  . 

27 12.  He  who  loves  adulteries,  calls  it  freedom  to 
commit  them  ...  for  in  lasciviousness  he  feels  delight, 
and  in  chastity  undelight.  He  who  is  in  the  love  of 
dominion  from  self-love,  in  that  love  feels  a  delight 
of  life  which  exceeds  all  other  delights  ...  So  with 
every  other  evil. 

3162.  Acts  and  works  are  the  ultimates  ;  from  these 
through  the  delights  of  uses  a  return  is  made  to  their 
primes  .  .  .  That  the  return  is  made  through  the  de- 
lights of  uses,  is  manifestly  evident  from  the  perceived 
delights  of  acts  and  works  which  are  of  the  man's  love, 
in  that  they  flow  back  to  the  prime  of  the  love  from 
which  they  come,  and  in  that  conjunction  is  thereby 
effected  :  the  delights  of  acts  and  works  are  what  are 
called  the  delights  of  use. 

4.  The  delights  of  uses  do  not  present  ideas  in 

the  thought,  but  only  affect,  without  any  distinct 
perception. 

363s.  There  are  many  things  of  love  which  have  been 
allotted  other  names,  because  they  are  derivations  ;  as 
affections,  desires,  appetites,  and  their  pleasures  and 
Delights. 

3.  From  these    two   are   derived  sensations  .  .  . 

with  their  delights  and  pleasantnesses. 

P.  38.  No  man  who  is  in  the  delights  of  the  concu- 
piscences of  evil,  can  know  anything  of  the  delights  of 
the  affections  of  good  in  which  is  the  angelic  Heaven  ; 
for  these  delights  are  quite  opposite  to  each  other  in 
internals,  and  thence  interiorly  in  externals,  though  in 
the  surface  itself  there  is  but  little  difference.  For 
every  love  has  its  own  delights.  Enum.  .  .  The  spring  of 
these  delights  is  the  love  of  dominion  from  self-love. 
These  delights  are  from  the  concupiscences  which  obsess 
the  interiors  of  the  mind ;  from  these  they  flow  clown 
into  the  body  .  .  .  Hence,  from  the  delight  of  the  mind, 
according  to  the  concupiscences,  there  arises  the  delight- 
ing-jucimdatio-oi  the  body. 

e.  These  foul  Delights,  after  they  have  entered 

Hell,  are  turned  into  direful  things. 

39.  The  blessednesses,  joyousnesses,  Delights,  and 
pleasantnesses  ;  in  a  word,  the  happinesses  of  Heaven, 
cannot  be  described  in  words.  (See  Happiness  at 
this  ref.) 

40.  The  Delights  of  the  concupiscences  of  evil,  and 
the  Delights  of  the  affections  of  good,  cannot  be  com- 
pared ;  because  the  devil  is  within  the  Delights  of  the 
concupiscences  of  evil,  and  the  Lord  is  within  the 
Delights  of  the  affections  of  good.  If  they  are  to  be 
compared,  the  Delights  of  the  concupiscences  of  evil  can 
only  be  compared  to  the  lascivious  Delights  of  frogs  in 
ponds,  and  of  serpents  in  stenches  ;  but  the  Delights  of 
the  affections  of  good  may  be  compared  to  those  of  the 
mind  in  gardens  .  .  . 

732.  Every  delight  which  man  has,  is  from  his  love  ; 
from  no  other  source  does  there  exist  any  delight ;  and 
to  act  from  the  delight  of  love  is  to  act  from  freedom  ; 


D  B\\g](ii,-Jucundu  m 


94 


Delight-fucundum 


for  delight  leads  a  man  as  a  river  does  that  which  is 
carried  along  by  its  current. 

e.  Everyone   can    come   into   spiritual   freedom, 

provided  he  is  willing  to  think  .  .  .  that  the  delight  and 
blessedness  of  life  in  time  for  time,  is  only  as  a  transient 
shadow,  compared  to  the  delight  and  blessedness  of  life 
in  eternity  to  eternity. 

[P.]  83s.  Man  is  born  into  the  love  of  self  and  the  love 
of  the  world  .  .  .  the  delights  of  these  loves  are  what  he 
is  led  by,  and  the  delights  cause  him  not  to  know  that 
he  is  in  evils  ;  for  every  delight  of  love  is  felt  no  other- 
wise than  as  good  .  .  . 

3.  After  death  .  .  .  these  cannot  have  any  other 

delight  than  that  which  they  had  in  their  spirit  while 
they  lived  in  the  world ;  and  this  delight  is  the  delight 
of  infernal  love,  which  is  turned  into  what  is  undelight- 
ful,  painful,  and  direful. 

4.  At  first,  he  thinks  (about  Heaven)  from  the 

delight  of  self-love ;  this  delight  is  to  him  the  joy  of 
Heaven  ;  but  so  long  as  the  delight  of  this  love  reigns, 
together  with  the  delights  of  the  evils  which  stream 
forth  therefrom,  he  cannot  understand  (what  it  is  to  go 
to  Heaven)  .  .  .  (For)  he  thinks  nothing  of  the  evils  in 
the  delights  of  which  he  is,  and  so  long  as  their  delights 
remain,  the  evils  also  remain  ;  their  delights  are  from 
the  concupiscence  of  them,  which  continually  breathes 
and  also  produces  them,  when  no  fear  withholds.  So 
long  as  evils  remain  in  the  concupiscences  and  thence  in 
the  delights  of  their  love,  there  is  no  faith,  charity, 
etc.,  except  in  mere  externals. 

85.  So  long  as  the  delight  of  the  love  of  evil  reigns, 
man  cannot  freely  will  what  is  good  and  true  .  .  .  there- 
fore cannot  appropriate  them.  .  .  He  first  acts  from  the 
delight  of  the  love  of  what  is  good  and  true  when  the 
delight  of  the  love  of  what  is  evil  and  false  has  been 
removed ;  for  two  delights  of  love  which  are  opposite 
to  each  other  do  not  exist  at  the  same  time.  To  act 
from  the  delight  of  love,  is  to  act  from  freedom. 

108.  There  are  everywhere  three  things  which  make  a 
one,  and  are  called  end,  cause,  and  effect ;  the  life's  love 
is  the  end,  the  affections  with  their  perceptions  are  the 
cause,  and  the  delights  of  the  affections  with  their 
thoughts  are  the  effect ;  for  just  as  the  end  through  the 
cause  comes  into  the  effect,  so  does  the  love  through  its 
affections  come  to  its  delights  .  .  .  The  effects  themselves 
are  in  the  delights  of  the  mind  and  their  thoughts,  when 
the  delights  are  of  the  will  and  the  thoughts  are  of  the 
understanding  thence  ;  thus  when  there  is  a  full  consent 
therein. 

in2.  It  is  the  external  understanding  which  is  in 
delights  of  concupiscences  .  .  .  Everyone  can  see  that 
concupiscences  and  their  delights  make  one.  .  .  Con- 
cupiscences through  their  delights  produce  evils  ;  but 
when  evils  are  believed  to  be  allowable  .  .  .  the  delights 
and  the  evils  make  one. 

112.  The  delight  which  is  felt  (from  concupiscences)  is 
in  the  body. 

2.  Concupiscences  with  their  delights  may  be  com- 
pared to  fire  .  .  .  The  concupiscences  of  evil  with  their 
delights  also  appear  as  fires  in  the  Spiritual  World  ; 
infernal  fire  is  nothing  else. 

3.  If  evils  in  the  external  man  are  not  removed, 


concupiscences  with  their  delights  grow  and  abound. 
Examps. 

113.  Man  cannot  perceive  the  concupiscences  of  his 
own  evil ;  he  does  indeed  perceive  the  delights  of  them, 
but  reflects  little  about  them  ;  for  delights  delight- 
oblectent-the  thoughts,  and  take  away  reflections. 

126.  When  the  love  of  heavenly  life  is  implanted  by 
the  Lord  in  place  of  the  love  of  infernal  life  ...  in  place 
of  the  delights  of  the  concupiscences  of  evil  and  falsity, 
are  implanted  the  delights  of  the  affections  of  good  .  .  . 

1 36s.  External  delights  allure  the  internal  to  consent, 
and  also  to  love.  Ex.  Delights  are  of  two  kinds ; 
delights  of  the  understanding  and  delights  of  the  will : 
the  delights  of  the  understanding  are  also  the  delights 
of  wisdom,  and  the  delights  of  the  will  are  also  the 
delights  of  love.  .  .  Now,  as  the  delights  of  the  body 
and  its  senses,  which  are  external  delights,  act  as  one 
with  the  internal  delights,  which  are  of  the  understand- 
ing and  the  will,  it  follows,  that  .  .  .  the  internal 
gratefully  beholds  delight  iu  the  external,  so  much  as 
to  turn  itself  to  it ;  thus  is  produced  consent  on  the  part 
of  the  understanding,  and  love  on  the  part  of  the  will. 

6.  All  little  children  there  are  introduced  into 

wisdom  .  .  .  by  means  of  delights  and  pleasantnesses 
from  the  Lord  .  .  .  thus  continually  by  means  of  delights 
in  their  order ;  first,  by  the  delights  of  the  love  of  the 
understanding  and  its  wisdom  ;  lastly,  by  the  delights 
of  the  love  of  the  will  .  .  .  under  which  the  other  things 
which  have  entered  through  delights,  are  kept  subor- 
dinate. 

7   When  the  first  understanding  and  the  first  will 

are  formed,  the  internal  of  thought  .  .  .  conjoins  itself 
with  them  if  they  are  delightful,  and  separates  itself 
from  them  if  they  are  not  so. 

1452.  As  the  delights  of  the  concupiscences  of  evil, 
which  obsess  the  external  of  thought,  cannot  be  cast  out 
at  the  same  time,  a  combat  takes  place  between  the  in- 
ternal and  the  external  of  thought ;  the  internal  wanting 
to  cast  out  those  delights,  because  they  are  delights  of 
evil .  .  .  and  in  place  of  the  delights  of  evil  to  introduce 
the  delights  of  good  .  .  .  The  delights  of  good  are  what 
are  called  the  goods  of  charity. 

3.  Man  compels  himself,  when  he  compels  the 

external  of  his  thought  ...  to  receive  the  delights  of 
his  affections,  which  are  the  goods  of  charity. 

146.  For  example  :  a  man  who  has  perceived  delight 
in  frauds  .  .  .  sees  that  they  are  sins  .  .  .  The  internal 
man  is  then  in  the  affection  of  sincerity,  but  the  external 
is  still  in  the  delight  of  defrauding  ;  which  delight, 
because  it  is  quite  opposite  to  the  delight  of  sincerity, 
does  not  recede  unless  it  is  compelled  .  .  .  But  when  he 
overcomes,  the  external  man  comes  into  the  delight  of 
the  love  of  sincerity,  which  is  charity  ;  afterwards, 
successively,  the  delight  of  defrauding  becomes  unde- 
light  to  him.     It  is  the  same  with  all  other  sins. 

147.  Man  is  in  the  natural  mind  only,  so  long  as  he 
is  in  the  concupiscences  of  evil  and  their  delights  .  .  . 

•-.   It  is  this  which  appears  ...  as  temptation  with 

those  who  have  indulged  much  in  the  delight  of  evil. 
(With  others  as  combat. ) 

1 86.  Man  is  in  the  delight  of  his  own  love,  and  this 


Delight~/uci/ndut;i 


95 


D  Q\\g]lt-Jucundii??i 


delight  makes  his  life  itself ;  wherefore,  when  man  is 
kept  in  the  delight  of  his  life,  he  is  in  his  freedom  ;  for 
freedom  and  this  delight  make  one.  If,  therefore,  he 
were  to  perceive,  that  he  is  being  continually  drawn 
away  from  his  delight,  he  would  be  exasperated  .  .  . 

195.  As  the  life's  love  has  its  own  delight,  and  its 
wisdom  its  own  pleasantness  ;  and,  in  like  manner, 
every  affection  .  .  .  has  its  own  delight,  and  thence 
every  perception  and  thought  its  pleasantness ;  it  follows, 
that  these  delights  and  pleasantnesses  make  man's  life. 
What  is  life  without  delight  and  pleasantness  ?  It  is 
not  anything  animate,  but  inanimate.  Diminish  these, 
and  you  grow  old  or  torpid  ;  take  them  away,  and  you 
will  expire  and  die.  From  the  delights  of  the  affections, 
and  from  the  pleasantnesses  of  the  perceptions  and 
thoughts,  is  the  vital  heat.  As  every  affection  has  its 
own  delight,  and  the  thought  thence  its  own  pleasant- 
ness, it  may  be  evident  whence  are  good  and  truth,  and 
also  what  they  are  in  their  essence.  Good  is  to  everyone 
that  which  is  the  delight  of  his  affection,  and  truth  is 
that  which  is  the  pleasantness  of  the  thought  thence  ; 
for  everyone  calls  that  good  which  from  the  love  of  his 
will  he  feels  delightful,  and  that  truth  which  from  the 
wisdom  of  his  understanding  he  thence  perceives  as 
pleasant. 

3.  These  two,  delight  and  pleasantness,  in  the 

mind  are  spiritual,  but  in  the  body  are  natural  ;  both 
make  man's  life.  Hence  it  is  evident  .  .  .  that  that  is 
evil  to  man  which  destroys  the  delight  of  his  affection, 
and  that  falsity  which  destroys  the  pleasantness  of  his 
thought  thence ;  and  that  evil  from  its  delight,  and 
falsity  from  its  pleasantness,  may  be  believed  to  be  good 
and  true.  Goods  and  truths  are  indeed  changes  and 
variations  of  the  state  of  the  forms  of  the  mind,  but  these 
are  only  perceived  and  live  by  means  of  their  delights 
and  pleasantnesses. 

196.  As  the  mind  .  .  .  thinks  from  the  delight  of  the 
affection  ...  it  follows  that  the  spirit  is  nothing  but 
affection  and  thence  thought.  .  .  All  there  think  from 
the  affections  of  their  life's  love,  the  delight  thereof 
encompassing  everyone  as  his  atmosphere. 

198.  Affection  manifests  itself  only  by  means  of  a 
certain  delight  of  thought,  and  the  pleasure  of  reasoning 
about  it,  and  then  this  pleasure  and  delight  make  one 
with  the  thought  with  those  who  are  in  the  faith  of 
their  own  prudence  .  .  .  and  the  thought  flows  in  its 
delight  as  a  ship  in  a  current  ...  to  which  the  pilot 
pays  no  attention. 

199.  A  man  can  indeed  reflect  upon  the  delight  of  his 
external  affection  when  it  acts  as  one  with  the  delight 
of  any  bodily  sense ;  but  still  he  does  not  reflect  upon 
this,  that  this  delight  is  from  the  delight  of  his  affection 
in  the  thought.  Examps.  .  .  He  does  not  feel  the  delight 
of  his  affection  ...  in  the  thought,  except  as  a  certain 
desire  connected  with  the  body.  .  .  That  these  delights 
rule  his  thoughts,  and  that  without  them  his  thoughts 
are  nothing,  is  evident ;  but  he  supposes  that  they  are 
only  thoughts .  .  . 

200.  As  the  delights  of  man's  affections,  from  inmost 
things  through  interior  ones  to  exterior  ones,  and  at 
last  to  the  outermost  ones  which  are  in  the  body,  cany 
man  along  as  the  waves  and  winds  do  a  ship,  and  as 


nothing  of  them  appears  to  man,  except  what  takes 
place  in  the  outermost  things  of  the  mind  and  in  the 
outermost  things  of  the  body,  how  can  he  claim  what  is 
Divine  from  .  .  .  these  few  outermost  things  appearing 
to  him  as  his  own  ? 

2062.  So  also  the  delights  of  concupiscences,  which 
are  evils,  and  their  thoughts,  which  are  falsities  (have 
life  from  self-love). 

207.  Self-love  is  the  devil  ;  and  concupiscences  and 
their  delights  are  the  evils  of  his  kingdom  .  .  . 

2159.  It  has  been  granted  me  to  feel  the  nature  and 
greatness  of  the  delight  of  the  love  of  dominion  from 
self-love.  .  .  It  surpassed  all  the  delights  in  the  world. 
It  was  a  delight  of  the  whole  mind  from  its  inmost 
things  to  its  ultimates,  but  in  the  body  was  felt  no 
otherwise  than  as  pleasure  and  cheerfulness  with  a 
swelling  bosom.  (I  felt)  that  from  this  delight,  as  from 
their  fountain,  spring  forth  the  delights  of  all  evils. 
Enum.  There  is  a  similar  delight  in  the  love  of  pos- 
sessing the  riches  of  others  .  .  .  and  in  the  concupiscences 
therefrom  .  .  .  but  not  in  the  same  degree,  unless  it  is 
conjoined  with  self-love. 

216.  As  the  natural  man  calls  goods  the  delights  of 
self-love,  which  are  also  the  delights  of  the  concupis- 
cences of  evil  ...  he  calls  honours  and  riches  Divine 
blessings  .  .  . 

279s.  Such  do  not  know,  that  evil  is  the  delight  of 
the  concupiscence  of  acting  and  thinking  contrary  to 
Divine  order,  and  that  good  is  the  delight  of  the  affec- 
tion of  acting  and  thinking  according  to  Divine  order. 

28 12.  The  love  of  the  will  inflows  into  the  understand- 
ing, and  there  makes  its  delight  felt .  .  . 

3.  What  man  would  be  if  he  were  not  permitted 

to  think  according  to  the  delights  of  his  life's  love.  Ex. 
.  .  .  The  delights  of  these  evils  would  so  take  possession 
of  the  interiors  of  his  mind  that  they  would  open  the 
door  .  .  .  (thus  his  insanity  would  openly  appear). 

296s.  As  man  wills  and  does  evil,  he  introduces  him- 
self more  and  more  interiorly  and  deeply  into  infernal 
Societies  ;  hence  the  delight  of  evil  grows,  and  so  takes 
possession  of  his  thoughts,  that  at  last  he  feels  nothing 
sweeter.  Examps. 

9.  These  evils  are  not  felt  as  evils,  but  as  delights, 

to  which  no  one  attends  :  who  attends  to  the  delights 
of  his  love  ?  In  these  his  thought  swims,  as  a  boat 
which  is  carried  along  in  a  current  ...  He  can  only  feel 
something  from  them  in  his  external  thought ;  but  he 
does  not  attend  to  them  even  there,  unless  he  well 
knows  that  they  are  evils. 

10.  Withdrawal  from  evil  is  effected  in  a  thousand 

ways.  •  .  (The  most  general  are),  that  the  delights  of 
concupiscences,  of  which  man  knows  nothing,  are  let 
out  in  bundles  into  the  interior  thoughts,  which  are  of 
man's  spirit,  and  thence  into  his  exterior  thoughts  ;  hi 
which  they  appear  under  some  sense  of  pleasure,  pleasant- 
ness, or  desire,  and  are  there  commingled  with  his 
natural  and  sensuous  delights.  The  means  of  separation 
and  purification  are  there  .  .  .  which  are  especially  the 
delights  of  meditation,  of  thought,  of  reflection  for  the 
sake  of  certain  ends  which  are  uses  .  .  .  These  delights, 
because  they  are  of  his  love  in  the  external  man,  are 


D  ellgilt-fawidu  m 


96 


D  eligTcLt-faaoidum 


means  for  the  separation,  purification,  excretion,  and 
withdrawal  of  the  delights  of  the  concupiscences  of  evil 
of  the  internal  man.  Examp.  .  .  (This  unjust  judge)  does 
not  know  that  his  internal  delight  consists  of  cunning, 
fraud,  deceit,  etc.,  and  that  this  delight,  composed  of 
so  many  delights  of  the  concupiscences  of  evil,  has 
dominion  in  each  and  everything  of  his  external  thought, 
in  which  are  the  delights  of  appearing  to  be  just  and 
sincere.  The  internal  delights  are  let  down  into  these 
external  delights,  and  are  commingled  like  foods  in  the 
stomach  ;  and  there  they  are  separated,  purified,  and 
withdrawn  ;  but  (with  an  evil  man)  this  is  done  only 
with  the  more  grievous  delights  of  the  concupiscences  of 
evil.  But  with  a  good  man  there  exists  a  separation, 
purification,  and  withdrawal  ...  of  the  less  grievous 
evils  also,  and  this  is  effected  by  means  of  the  delights 
of  the  affections  of  good  and  truth,  and  of  justice  and 
sincerity,  into  which  he  comes  in  proportion  as  he  regards 
evils  as  sins,  and  therefore  shuns  them,  and  still  more  if 
he  fights  against  them.  .  .  The  Lord  also  purifies  them 
through  external  means  (of  honours,  gain,  etc. ) ;  yet  in 
these  the  Lord  inserts  the  delights  of  the  affections  of 
good  and  truth,  by  means  of  which  they  are  so  directed 
and  adapted  as  to  become  delights  of  the  love  of  the 
neighbour. 

13.  If  anyone  were  to  see  the  delights  of  the  con- 
cupiscences of  evil  together,  in  some  form  ...  he  would 
see  them  in  such  a  number  that  they  could  not  be 
defined  .  .  . 

[P.  ]  298s.  Every  evil  Spirit  .  .  .  calls  his  own  evil  good, 
for  he  feels  it  as  delight. 

303.  Instead  of  the  affections  of  good,  take  the  delights 
of  good,  and  instead  of  the  concupiscences  of  evil,  take 
the  delights  of  evil ;  for  there  is  no  affection  or  con- 
cupiscence without  its  delights,  for  these  make  the  life 
of  every  one  of  them :  these  delights  are  what  are  so 
distinguished  and  conjoined,  as  was  said  above  concerning 
the  affections  of  good  and  the  concupiscences  of  evil. 
The  delight  of  his  affection  infils  and  surrounds  every 
Angel  of  Heaven  ;  and  the  general  delight  also  infils  and 
surrounds  every  Society  of  Heaven  ;  and  the  delight  of 
all  together,  or  the  most  general  one,  the  universal 
Heaven.  In  like  manner,  the  delight  of  his  concupiscence 
infils  and  surrounds  every  Spirit  of  Hell ;  and  the 
general  delight  every  Society  of  Hell ;  and  the  delight 
of  all  or  most  general  delight,  the  whole  Hell.  As  the 
affections  of  Heaven  and  the  concupiscences  of  Hell  are 
diametrically  opposite  to  each  other,  it  is  evident  that 
the  delight  of  Heaven  is  such  undelight  in  Hell  that 
they  cannot  endure  it,  and  contrariwise  .  .  . 

304.  These  delights,  as  they  make  the  life  of  each  one 
in  particular,  and  of  all  in  general,  are  not  felt  by  those 
who  are  in  them  ;  but  their  opposites  are  felt  when  they 
approach,  especially  when  they  are  turned  into  odours  ; 
for  every  delight  corresponds  to  an  odour,  and  in  the 
Spiritual  "World  can  be  converted  into  it.  Then  the 
general  delight  in  Heaven  is  smelt  as  the  odour  of  a 
garden,  with  variety  according  to  the  fragrance  from  the 
flowers  and  fruits  in  it ;  and  the  general  delight  in  Hell 
is  smelt  like  stagnant  water,  into  which  have  been 
thrown  various  kinds  of  filth  .  .  . 

324s.  What  is  good  but  delight  ?  ...  All  good  is  called 


good  from  its  delight  or  blessedness.  All  that  is  given 
and  possessed  is  indeed  called  good,  but  unless  there  is 
also  delight,  it  is  barren  good,  which  in  itself  is  not 
good. 

7.  The  reason  all  do  not  come  into  Heaven,  is  that 

they  imbue  the  delights  of  Hell  opposite  to  the  blessed- 
ness of  Heaven  .  .  .  He  who,  when  he  comes  there,  is  in 
the  delight  of  Hell,  has  palpitation  of  the  heart,  etc. 

8.  As  they  cannot  live  with  any  but  those  who 

are  in  a  like  delight  of  life,  they  are  sent  back  to 
them  ;  consequently,  they  who  are  in  the  delights  of 
evil,  to  their  own  ;  and  they  who  are  in  the  delights  of 
good,  to  their  own.  Nay,  it  is  granted  to  everyone  to 
be  in  the  delight  of  his  evil,  provided  he  does  not  infest 
those  who  are  in  the  delight  of  good  ;  but  as  evil  cannot 
do  otherwise  than  infest  good  .  .  .  they  are  cast  down 
into  their  own  places  in  Hell,  where  their  delight  is 
turned  into  undelight. 

3352.  If  there  were  any  end  to  wisdom  with  a  wise 
man,  the  delight  of  his  wisdom  would  perish  .  .  .  and 
thus  the  delight  of  his  life  ;  and  in  its  place  would 
succeed  the  delight  of  glory  .  .  . 

338s.  In  the  spiritual  state  ...  no  one  can  be  any- 
where but  where  his  reigning  love  is  ;  for  there  is  the 
delight  of  his  life,  and  everyone  wants  to  be  in  the 
delight  of  his  life.  A  man's  spirit  cannot  be  anywhere 
else,  because  this  makes  his  life,  yea,  his  very  breathing, 
and  the  beat  of  his  heart.  It  is  otherwise  in  the  natural 
world,  where  the  external  of  man  is  taught  from  infancy 
to  simulate  other  delights  .  .  . 

6.  Hence  ...  no  one  can  be  let  into  the  delight 

of  Heaven  .  .  .  who  is  in  the  delight  of  Hell ;  or,  what 
is  the  same,  into  the  delight  of  good  who  is  in  the 
delight  of  evil.     (From  experience.) 

7.  Some  .  .  .  Spirits  wanted  their  infernal  delight, 

or  delight  of  evil,  to  be  transmuted  .  .  .  into  heavenly 
delight,  or  the  delight  of  good  ...  It  was  permitted 
that  it  should  be  done  by  Angels,  who  then  removed 
that  infernal  delight ;  but  then,  because  it  was  the 
delight  of  their  life's  love,  thus  their  life,  they  lay  as  if 
they  were  dead  .  .  .  They  were  therefore  resuscitated  by 
the  immission  of  the  delight  of  their  life's  love ;  and 
they  said  that  in  that  state  they  felt  interiorly  something 
direful  and  horrible  .  .  . 

3406.  Certain  Spirits  from  Hell  said  to  me,  Write 
something  from  us  .  .  .  Write  that  every  Spirit,  whether 
good  or  evil,  is  in  his  own  delight ;  the  good  in  the 
delight  of  his  own  good,  and  the  evil  in  the  delight  of 
his  own  evil.  I  asked  them,  What  is  your  delight  ? 
They  said  that  it  was  the  delight  of  committing  adultery, 
stealing,  defrauding,  and  lying.  Again  I  asked,  What 
is  the  quality  of  those  delights  ?  They  said  that  they 
were  smelt  by  others  as  stenches  from  ordures,  carcases, 
and  stagnant  urine.  I  said,  Are  these  delights  to  you  ? 
They  said  that  they  were  most  delightful .  .  . 

7.  I  said,  What  more  shall  I  write  from  you  ? 

They  said,  This,  that  it  is  permitted  everyone  to  be  in 
his  own  delight,  even  the  most  unclean,  as  they  call  it, 
provided  he  does  not  infest  good  Spirits  and  Angels  .  .  . 

R.  5022.  That  the  love  of  dominion  from  self-love, 
and  the  love  of  reigning  from  the  conceit  of  man's  Own 
intelligence,  are  the  heads  of  all  infernal  loves,  and  thus 


"Delight-yucundum 


97 


"Delight-Jucundum 


the  heads  of  all  the  evils  and  falsities  in  the  Church,  is 
at  this  day  not  known  :  the  delights  of  these  loves, 
which  surpass  the  delights  of  all  the  pleasures  of  the 
disposition,  make  this  not  known. 

507.  The  delight  of  the  affection  of  the  heart  and 
soul  on  that  account .  .  .  with  those  who  were  in  faith 
alone  as  to  doctrine  and  life.  Sig.  .  .  'To  rejoice'  and 
'to  be  glad '  =  to  have  the  delight  of  the  affection  of  the 
heart  and  soul ;  the  delight  of  the  affection  of  the  heart 
is  of  the  will,  and  the  delight  of  the  affection  of  the 
soul  is  of  the  understanding. 

692.  That  on  account  of  the  delight  of  self-love 
originating  from  grievous  concupiscences  of  evils  they 
did  not  acknowledge  the  divinity  of  the  Lord's  Human. 
Sig.  .  .  '  Heat '  =  the  concupiscences  of  the  evils  which 
are  in  the  love  of  self  and  its  delight  .  .  .  there- 
fore, 'to  scorch  with  great  heat '  =  to  be  in  grievous 
concupiscences,  and  thus  in  the  delight  of  love. 

2.  The    delight    (of   self-love)    surpasses    every 

delight  in  the  world  ;  for  it  is  made  up  of  mere  con- 
cupiscences of  evils,  and  every  concupiscence  breathes 
forth  its  own  delight ;  every  man  is  born  into  this 
delight  .  .  .  When  this  delight  grows,  it  causes  a  man 
not  to  be  able  to  think  above  himself  .  .  . 

908.  Good  is  only  felt,  and  it  is  felt  under  various 
kinds  of  delight ;  as  man  does  not  attend  to  what  he 
feels  in  his  thought,  but  to  what  he  sees  there,  he  calls 
everything  good  which  he  feels  from  delight ;  and  from 
delight  he  feels  what  is  evil  .  .  . 

M.  53.  Heavenly  joy  ...  is  the  delight  of  doing 
something  that  is  of  use  to  self  and  others  ;  and  the 
delight  of  use  derives  its  essence  from  love,  and  its 
manifestation  from  wisdom  ;  the  delight  of  use  origin- 
ating from  love  through  wisdom,  is  the  soul  and  life  of 
all  heavenly  joys. 

162.  What  are  the  delights  of  the  bodily  senses  without 
the  delights  of  the  soul  ?  It  is  the  soul  which  delights 
the  former.  In  themselves,  the  delights  of  the  soul  are 
imperceptible  blessednesses  ;  but  they  become  more  and 
more  perceptible  as  they  descend  into  the  thoughts  of 
the  mind,  and  from  these  into  the  sensations  of  the 
body  ;  in  the  thoughts  of  the  mind  they  are  perceived 
as  joyousnesses,  in  the  sensations  of  the  body  as  Delights, 
and  in  the  body  itself  as  pleasures  ;  from  the  latter  and 
the  former  together  is  heavenly  happiness  .  .  . 

183.  Every  love  has  its  own  delight ;  for  the  love 
lives  thereby  ;  and  the  delight  of  the  love  of  uses  is 
heavenly  delight,  which  enters  into  the  succeeding 
delights  in  order,  and  according  to  the  order  of  succes- 
sion exalts  them,  and  makes  them  eternal. 

29e.  A  spiritual  man  feels  and  perceives  spiritual 
delight,  which  is  far  before  natural  delight,  because  it 
a  thousand  times  surpasses  it. 

5ie.  The  reason  the  fellowships  (of  married  partners) 
are  then  more  delightful  and  blessed,  is  that  when  this 
love  becomes  of  the  spirit,  it  becomes  more  interior  and 
pure,  and  therefore  more  perceptible  ;  and  all  Delight 
grows  according  to  the  perception,  and  grows  even  until 
its  blessedness  is  discernible  in  its  Delight. 

68.  All  delights  felt  by  man  are  of  his  love  ;  the  love 
manifests  itself,  nay,  it  comes  forth  and  lives  thereby. 
VOL.  11. 


It  is  known  that  delights  exalt  themselves  in  the  pro- 
portion that  love  exalts  itself,  and  in  the  proportion 
that  the  incident  affections  touch  the  reigning  love  more 
nearly  ;  (therefore  it  follows)  that  the  delights  of  marriage 
love  surpass  the  delights  of  all  loves,  and  that  it  also 
delights  these  according  to  its  presence  .  .  . 

2.  The  reason  all  delights  from  primes  to  ultimates 

are  collected  into  this  love,  is  on  account  of  the  superior 
excellence  of  its  use  ...  It  follows  that  all  the  blessed- 
nesses, joyousnesses,  Delights,  pleasantnesses,  and  plea- 
sures, which  the  Lord  Creator  could  possibly  confer  on 
men,  are  collected  into  this  His  love.  That  delights 
follow  the  use,  and  are  in  man  according  to  the  love  of 
this,  is  evident  from  the  delights  of  the  five  senses  .  .  . 
Each  of  these  has  delights  with  variations  according  to 
its  specific  uses  .  .  . 

692.  In  the  higher  principles  of  the  mind  (these 
deliciousnesses  of  the  soul  are  felt)  as  blessednesses  ;  in 
the  lower  principles  of  the  mind  as  joyousnesses  ;  in  the 
bosom  as  Delights  therefrom. 

1377.  No  one  knows  the  blessed  delights  of  marriage 
love  but  he  who  rejects  the  horrid  delights  of  adultery  ; 
and  no  one  can  reject  these  unless  he  is  wise  from  the 
Lord  ;  and  no  one  is  wise  from  the  Lord  unless  he  does 
uses  from  the  love  of  uses. 

2722.  The  reason  they  conjoin  themselves,  is  that 
every  affection  has  its  own  delight,  and  delights  tie 
dispositions  together.  .  .  It  would  be  otherwise  ...  if 
their  delights  were  smelt,  as  takes  place  in  the  Spiritual 
World. 

335.  Thus  only  with  one  wife  can  there  exist  the 
celestial  blessednesses,  the  spiritual  joyousnesses,  and 
the  natural  Delights,  which  have  been  provided  .  .  . 
for  those  who  are  in  love  truly  conjugial.  Gen. art. 
They  are  called  celestial  blessednesses,  spiritual  joyous- 
nesses, and  natural  Delights,  because  the  human  mind 
is  distinguished  into  three  regions  .  .  .  and  as  the 
pleasantnesses  of  this  love  are  the  most  eminent  in  the 
highest  region,  they  are  perceived  as  blessednesses  ;  and 
as  in  the  middle  region  they  are  less  eminent,  they  are 
perceived  as  joyousnesses  ;  and  at  last,  in  the  lowest 
region,  as  Delights. 

427.  It  is  the  delights  of  (scortatory  and  of  marriage) 
love  which  are  thus  opposite ;  for  love  without  its 
delights  is  not  anything.  That  these  delights  are  so 
opposite,  does  not  at  all  appear  .  .  .  because  in  externals 
the  delight  of  the  love  of  evil  counterfeits  the  delight 
of  the  love  of  good  ;  but  in  internals  the  delight  of  the 
love  of  evil  consists  of  mere  concupiscences  of  evil  .  .  . 
whereas  the  delight  of  the  love  of  good  consists  of 
innumerable  affections  of  good  .  .  .  This  bundle  and 
that  ball  are  felt  by  the  man  only  as  one  delight ;  and 
as  in  externals  the  delight  of  evil  counterfeits  the 
delight  of  good  .  .  .  the  delight  of  adultery  is  as  the 
delight  of  marriage  .  .  . 

430.  Into  such  uncleannesses  are  there  turned  the 
delights  of  scortatory  love.  Who  can  believe,  that  in 
the  Spiritual  World,  every  delight  of  love  is  presented 
to  the  sight  under  various  appearances,  to  the  smell 
under  various  odours,  and  to  the  view  under  various 
forms  of  beasts  and  birds  ?     Enum.  and  Ex. 


"Delight-faa/nduM 


98 


D  elight-faatfidu  m 


[M.]  439.  Each  sphere  bears  with  it  Delights.  Gen.  art. 
.  .  .  The  reason  is,  that  the  ultimate  plane,  in  which  the 
delights  of  each  love  cease,  and  where  they  infill  and 
complete  themselves  ...  is  the  same. 

e.  The  Angels  discriminate  in  the  extremes  what 

is  lascivious  from  what  is  not  so  .  .  .  and  this  is  from 
the  difference  of  the  internal  Delights,  which  enter  the 
external  ones  and  compose  them. 

440.  The  Delights  of  scortatory  love  begin  from  the 
flesh,  and  are  of  the  flesh  in  the  spirit ;  but  the  Delights 
of  marriage  love  begin  in  the  spirit,  and  are  of  the  spirit 
even  in  the  body.  Gen. art. 

2.  The  spirit  that   is   not   elevated    above    the 

sensuous  things  of  the  body  .  .  .  does  not  feel  any 
Delights  but  those  which  flow  in  from  the  flesh  and 
the  world  through  the  bodily  senses-;  these  it  seizes 
upon .  .  . 

e.  Wherefore  it  follows,  that  the  Delights  of  the 

flesh,  as  to  the  Delights  of  scortatory  love,  are  nothing 
but  the  effervescences  of  lusts  .  .  . 

441.  The  Delights  of  marriage  love  have  nothing  in 
common  with  the  feculent  Delights  of  scortatory  love  : 
the  latter  are  indeed  in  the  flesh  of  every  man,  but  they 
are  separated  and  removed,  as  the  man's  spirit  is  elevated 
above  the  sensuous  things  of  the  body  ...  It  then 
perceives  fleshly  delights,  first  as  apparent  and  fallacious 
delights,  and  afterwards  as  libidinous  and  lascivious 
ones  which  are  to  be  shunned  .  .  .  and  at  last  it  feels 
them  as  undelightful,  shocking,  and  nauseous  ;  and  in 
the  degree  that  it  thus  perceives  and  feels  these  delights, 
it  perceives  the  delights  of  marriage  love  as  harmless 
and  chaste,  and  at  last  as  delicious  and  blessed.  The 
reason  the  Delights  of  marriage  love  also  become  of  the 
spirit  in  the  flesh,  is  that  after  the  Delights  of  scortatory 
love  have  been  removed,  the  spirit  enters  chaste  into  the 
body  .  .  . 

442.  The  Delights  of  scortatory  love  are  pleasures  of 
insanity  ;  but  the  Delights  of  marriage  love  are  delicious- 
nesses  of  wisdom.  Gen.  art. 

.  The  natural  man  .  .  ."embraces  only  natural, 

sensuous,  and  corporeal  Delights.  It  is  said  natural, 
sensuous,  and  corporeal  Delights,  because  the  Natural 
is  distinguished  into  three  degrees  .  .  . 

443.  The  reason  the  Delights  of  marriage  love  are 
deliciousnesses  of  wisdom,  is  that  none  but  spiritual 
men  are  in  that  love,  and  the  spiritual  man  is  in 
wisdom  ;  hence  he  embraces  no  Delights  but  such  as 
agree  with  spiritual  wisdom. 

.  The  quality  of  the  Delights  of  scortatory  love, 

and  the  quality  of  those  of  marriage  love  (shown  by  a 
comparison). 

461.  You  have  supplicated  to  be  instructed  about 
Heaven  and  Hell.  Inquire  and  learn  what  delight  is, 
and  you  will  Know.  .  .  Accosting  those  he  met,  he  said, 
Tell  me  .  .  .  what  delight  is.  Some  said  .  .  .  Who  does 
not  know  what  delight  is  ?  Is  it  not  joy  and  gladness  ? 
Wherefore  delight  is  delight  .  .  .  Others  said,  that 
delight  is  the  laughter  of  the  mind  .  .  .  Some  said, 
Delight  is  nothing  else  but  feasting  ...  On  hearing 
these  answers,  the  novitiate  Spirit  said  .  .  .  These 
delights  are  neither  Heaven  nor  Hell ;  would  that  I 
could  meet  the  wise  ...  An  Angelic  Spirit ...  led  him 


to  .  .  .  the  company  of  those  who  explore  ends,  and  are 
called  Wisdoms.  To  these  he  said  .  .  .  Teach  me  what 
delight  is.  The  Wisdoms  replied,  Delight  is  the  all  of 
life  to  all  in  Heaven,  and  the  all  of  life  to  all  in  Hell ; 
they  who  are  in  Heaven  have  the  delight  of  good  and 
truth,  but  they  who  are  in  Hell  have  the  delight  of 
evil  and  falsity  ;  for  all  delight  is  of  love  .  .  .  wherefore, 
as  man  is  man  according  to  the  quality  of  his  love,  so  he 
is  man  according  to  the  quality  of  his  delight :  the 
activity  of  the  love  makes  the  sense  of  delight ;  its 
activity  in  Heaven  is  with  wisdom,  and  its  activity  in 
Hell  is  with  insanity  ;  each  in  its  own  objects  presents 
delight :  but  the  Heavens  and  the  Hells  are  in  opposite 
delights,  because  in  opposite  loves  ;  the  Heavens  in  the 
love  and  thence  in  the  delight  of  doing  good,  but  the 
Hells  in  the  love  and  thence  in  the  delight  of  doing 
evil :  if,  therefore,  you  Know  what  delight  is,  you  Know 
the  nature  and  quality  of  Heaven  and  Hell.  But 
inquire  and  learn  further  what  delight  is  from  those 
who  investigate  causes,  and  are  called  Intelligences.  .  . 
These,  rejoicing  at  the  question,  said,  It  is  true  that  he 
who  Knows  what  delight  is,  Knows  the  nature  and 
quality  of  Heaven  and  Hell.  The  will,  from  which  man 
is  man,  cannot  move  a  point  except  by  delight ;  for, 
regarded  in  itself,  the  will  is  nothing  but  the  affect  and 
effect  of  some  love,  thus  of  delight  .  .  .  and  as  the  will 
actuates  the  understanding  to  think,  there  is  not  the 
least  of  an  idea  of  thought,  except  from  the  influent 
delight  of  the  will.  The  reason  is,  that  the  Lord, 
through  influx  from  Himself,  actuates  all  things  of  the 
soul  and  all  things  of  the  mind  .  .  .  and  actuates  them 
through  the  influx  of  love  and  wisdom,  and  this  influx 
is  the  activity  itself,  from  which  is  all  the  delight  which 
in  its  origin  is  called  blessedness,  joyousness,  and  happi- 
ness ;  and  in  its  derivation,  delight,  pleasantness,  and 
pleasure  ;  and  in  the  universal  sense,  Good.  But  the 
Spirits  of  Hell  invert  all  things  .  .  .  good  into  evil,  and 
truth  into  falsity,  the  delight  constantly  remaining  ; 
for  without  the  permanence  of  delight,  they  would 
have  neither  will  nor  sensation,  thus  not  life.  Hence  is 
evident,  what,  of  what  kind,  and  whence,  is  the  delight 
of  Hell ;  also  what,  of  what  kind,  and  whence,  is  the 
delight  of  Heaven. 

7.  There  then  came  up  three  devils,  who  appeared 

on  fire  from  the  delight  of  their  love  ;  and  they  who 
were  consociated  with  the  novitiate  Spirit  .  .  .  said  to 
them  .  .  .  Tell  something  about  your  delights.  They 
said,  Know  that  everyone,  whether  good  or  evil,  is  in 
his  own  delight ;  a  good  person  in  the  delight  of  his 
own  good,  and  an  evil  one  in  the  delight  of  his  own 
evil.  They  asked,  What  is  your  delight  ?  They  said 
it  was  the  delight  of  committing  whoredom,  of  stealing, 
defrauding,  blaspheming.  They  asked  again,  Of  what 
sort  are  these  delights  ?  They  said,  that  they  are  smelt 
by  others  as  stenches  from  ordure,  carcases,  and  from 
stagnant  waters.  They  asked,  Are  these  delightful  to 
you  ?  They  said,  Most  delightful .  .  .  such  things  are 
the  deliciousnesses  of  our  nostrils.  They  asked,  What 
more  ?  They  said,  Everyone  is  allowed  to  be  in  his  own 
delight,  even  the  most  unclean,  as  they  call  it,  provided 
he  does  not  infest  good  Spirits  and  Angels  ;  but  as,  from 
our  delight,  we  cannot  do  otherwise  ...  we  have  been 
cast  into  workhouses,  where  we  suffer  direful  things  : 


Delight— Jucundum 


99 


Delight-J'ucundum 


the  restraining  of  our  delights  there,  is  what  is  called 
infernal  torment,  and  is  also  interior  pain.     T.570. 

5244.  The  delights  of  the  love  of  evil  are  averse  to 
the  delights  of  the  love  of  good,  and  delights  exhale 
from  everyone,  as  odours  do  from  every  plant ;  for  they 
are  not  absorbed  and  hidden  by  the  material  body  as 
before,  but  flow  out  freely  from  their  loves  into  the 
spiritual  aura  .  .  .  Moreover,  an  evil  person  chooses 
companions  with  whom  he  may  live  in  his  delight ;  and 
as  he  is  averse  to  the  delight  of  good,  he  spontaneously 
betakes  himself  to  his  own  in  Hell. 

e.  The  imputation   of  good  is   effected   in   like 

manner  .  .  .  These,  after  they  have  been  prepared,  are 
let  into  the  interior  delights  of  good  ;  and  then  there  is 
opened  to  them  a  way  into  Heaven,  to  the  Society  where 
its  homogeneous  delights  are.     This  is  done  by  the  Lord. 

I.  132.  Love  itself  and  wisdom  itself  are  not  life,  but 
are  the  being  of  life  ;  whereas  the  delights  of  love  and 
the  pleasantnesses  of  wisdom,  which  are  affections,  make 
life  .  .  .  The  influx  of  life  from  God  carries  with  it  these 
delights  and  pleasures  .  .  .  For  the  delights  of  love  and 
the  pleasantnesses  of  wisdom  expand  the  dispositions, 
and  adapt  them  to  reception  .  .  . 

T.  38.  The  delight  by  which  love  manifest  itself,  is 
to  each  person  good  .  .  . 

.  The  delights  of  love,  which  are  also  the  delights 

of  charity,  cause  delights  to  be  called  goods  ;  and  the 
pleasantnesses  of  wisdom,  which  are  also  the  pleasant- 
nesses of  faith,  cause  truths  to  be  called  truths ;  for 
delights  and  pleasantnesses  make  their  life ;  without 
life  from  these,  goods  and  truths  are  as  it  were  inanimate 
things,  and  are  also  barren  ones. 

2.  But  the  delights  of  love  are  of  two  kinds  ;  in 

like  manner  the  pleasantnesses  which  appear  as  of  wisdom  ; 
namely,  the  delights  of  the  love  of  good,  and  the  delights 
of  the  love  of  evil ;  and  thence  the  pleasantnesses  of  the 
faith  of  truth,  and  the  pleasantnesses  of  the  faith  of  falsity. 
In  the  subjects  in  which  they  are,  these  two  delights  of 
love,  from  their  sensation,  are  called  goods  ;  and  these  two 
pleasantnesses  of  faith,  from  their  perception,  are  also 
called  goods  ;  but  as  they  are  in  the  understanding,  they 
are  nothing  but  truths  .  .  .  But  the  love,  whose  delight 
is  essentially  good,  is  like  the  heat  of  the  sun  fructifying 
.  .  .  and  the  pleasantness  of  its  truth  is  as  the  light  of 
the  sun  in  the  spring  time  .  .  .  Whereas  the  delight  of 
the  love  of  evil,  is  like  the  heat  of  the  sun  parching  .  .  . 
and  the  pleasantness  of  its  falsity  is  as  the  light  of  the 
sun  in  winter  time  .  .  . 

e.  The  mind  whose  delights  of  love  are  good, 

consists  inwardly  of  spiritual  substances  such  as  are  in 
Heaven  ;  but  the  mind  whose  delights  are  evil ...  of 
such  as  are  in  Hell. 

798.  They  said,  "We  have  been  insane  .  .  .  (But)  they 
came  to  a  way  where  the  delights  of  their  loves  blew  on 
them,  and  they  said,  Let  us  go  this  way  ;  and  they  went 
and  descended,  and  at  last  came  to  those  who  were  in 
the  delights  of  the  like  loves,  and  further  ;  and  as  their 
delight  was  the  delight  of  doing  evil  .  .  .  they  were 
imprisoned,  and  became  demons  ;  and  then  their  delight 
was  converted  into  undelight ;  because  by  means  of 
penalties  and  the  fear  of  them,  they  were  restrained 
from  their  former  delight,  which  made  their  nature. 


3612.  In  proportion  as  faith  and  charity  become 
spiritual  with  man  ...  he  does  not  regard  himself .  .  . 
but  only  the  delight  of  perceiving  the  truths  of  faith, 
and  of  doing  the  goods  of  love ;  and  in  proportion  as 
this  spirituality  is  augmented,  this  delight  becomes 
blessedness. 

440.  With  these,  the  delight  of  doing  good  to  the 
neighbour  is  a  reward  :  the  Angels  .  .  .  have  this  delight, 
and  it  is  a  spiritual  delight  which  is  eternal,  and  im- 
mensely surpasses  every  natural  delight :  they  who  are 
in  this  delight  do  not  want  to  hear  of  merit .  .  . 

4422.  At  last  he  perceives  the  spiritual  delight  of 
charity  ;  and  then  he  begins  to  be  averse  to  merit  .  .  . 

4902.  When  (man  turns  the  influent  good  into  evil) 
the  delight  of  good  remains,  and  this  then  becomes  the 
delight  of  evil ;  for  without  the  delight  remaining  as 
it  were  similar,  the  man  would  not  live,  for  delight 
makes  the  life  of  his  love.  Still,  these  delights  are 
diametrically  opposite  to  each  other,  but  man  does  not 
know  this  so  long  as  he  lives  in  the  world  ;  whereas  .  .  . 
after  death  the  delight  of  the  love  of  good  is  turned 
into  heavenly  blessedness,  while  the  delight  of  the  love 
of  evil  is  turned  into  infernal  horrors. 

5322.  If  he  .  .  .  thinks  that  he  does  not  will  them, 
because  they  are  sins,  he  performs  true  and  interior 
repentance  ;  and  still  more  if  when  he  is  in  the  delight 
of  these  evils,  and  is  at  the  same  time  free  to  do  them, 
he  then  resists  and  abstains.  He  who  practises  this 
repeatedly,  perceives  the  delights  of  evils,  when  they 
return,  as  undelightful.  Sig. 

569.  Every  love  with  man  breathes  out  delight,  by 
which  it  makes  itself  felt ;  proximately  it  breathes  it 
into  the  spirit,  and  thence  into  the  body  ;  and  the 
delight  of  his  love,  together  with  the  pleasantness  of 
the  thought,  makes  his  life.  These  delights  and 
pleasantnesses  are  not  felt  by  man,  except  obscurely, 
while  he  lives  in  the  natural  body,  because  this  body 
absorbs  and  blunts  them  ;  but  after  death  .  .  .  the 
delights  of  his  love  and  the  pleasantnesses  of  his  thought 
are  fully  felt  and  perceived  .  .  .  sometimes  as  odours. 
Enum. 


Ad.  9503.  To  these  succeed  infra-celestial  Goodnesses, 
which  are  intermediate  between  the  spiritual  and  the 
natural  ones,  and  properly  affect  the  natural  mind,  or 
disposition,  which  men  have  in  common  with  the 
animals  ;  these  are  the  Delights  themselves  of  life, 
which  are  also  called  pleasures ;  with  men,  however, 
they  are  entirely  different  from  what  they  are  with 
brute  animals,  according  to  the  state  of  each  person,  or 
according  to  the  order  of  life  which  each  one  lives. 

D.  87  (Index).  Heavenly  delight  perceived  by  me  .  .  . 
with  solicitudes  that  the  delights  might  be  perceived 
more  distinctly. 

128  (Index).  How  miserable  the  state  would  be  if  all 
in  the  universe  were  not  ruled,  by  the  Lord,  may  be 
evident  from  the  fact  that  they  have  delight  in  torment- 
ing all  others. 

i8ie.  Some  Spirits  are  only  affections,  who  affect  man 
with  a  certain  delicious  Delight ;  if  they  are  evil,  they 
are  to  be  called  Sirens. 


Delight-Jucundum 


100 


Delight-Jucundum 


[D.]  1 86.  There  is  a  correspondence  of  all  things, 
which  can  be  turned  into  Delights  .  .  .  The  most  distinct 
delightful  representations  can  be  drawn  out  .  .  .  For 
while  the  mind  inheres  in  its  delights  in  general,  every 
object  is  turned  into  the  form  of  that  Delight. 

1 88.  The  most  delightful  ideas  of  the  Angels  .  .  . 

218.  Unless  these  Spirits  enjoyed  freedom,  the  human 
race  .  .  .  could  not  live  in  such  corporeal  and  earthly 
Delight. 

219.  That  it  has  been  granted  me  to  communicate  as 
it  were  heavenly  Delight  to  upright  Souls  in  captivity. 

.  For  many  years  it  has  been  granted  me  mani- 
festly to  feel  heavenly  Delights  in  various  ways  ;  so 
many  and  such  that  I  cannot  possibly  describe  them  .  .  . 
This  very  day  .  .  .  heavenly  Delights  have  been  granted 
to  me,  not  expressible,  and  which  I  was  permitted  .  .  . 
to  transfer  to  the  Souls  in  captivity  ;  which  Delights 
they  said  they  could  feel,  and  thus  they  received 
comfort. 

221.  Little  children,  who  are  said  to  live  in  such  .  .  . 
Delight. 

23<De.  They  no  longer  know  what  Delight  is,  such  as 
there  is  in  the  other  life. 

231.  That  from  sadnesses  and  insanities  there  are 
Delights  of  intelligence  in  the  other  life. 

.   I  could  have  been  greatly  affected,  in  fact  with 

a  new  Delight  .  .  .  From  the  influx  of  similar  ones  such 
Delights  could  be  effected  as  flow  into  innocencies  .  .  . 
By  the  Divine  omnipotence  .  .  .  Delights  may  hence  be 
produced  .  .  .  Thus  from  insanities  .  .  .  which  are  in  the 
highest  degree  undelightful,  gladnesses  and  Delights 
.  .  .  may  be  brought  out  ...  I  felt  a  kind  of  gladness 
.  .  .  that  such  things  as  in  themselves  are  unhappinesses 
and  undelightfulnesses  were  also  for  utility  ;  with  the 
hope  that  such  of  these  (female  Spirits)  as  are  illuminated 
in  the  things  of  faith  in  God  Messiah,  might  be  able  to 
perceive  Delights  from  some  other  source,  composed  as 
it  were  from  opposites  .  .  . 

275.  They  there  enjoy  a  blessed  and  delightful  life  of 
imagination. 

301.  That  in  the  more  interior  Heaven  there  is 
ineffable  Delight  and  happiness. 

307.  I  felt  a  certain  delightful  panting  from  him. 

329.  All  things  set  before  the  eyes  .  .  .  are  vivified  by 
God  Messiah  into  Delights  and  pleasant  series  of  Delights. 
While  I  was  walking  in  the  street  beholding  many 
diverse  objects,  which,  on  account  of  their  diversity,  no 
one  could  ever  suppose  could  be  transferred  and  thus 
vivified  into  a  continuous  series  of  Delights,  I  heard 
from  the  Angels  that  they  thence  perceived  a  continuous 
variety  of  Delights,  thus  from  objects  of  which  they 
perceived  nothing. 

336.  Knowledges  .  .  .  c,an  delightfully  affect  the  whole 
Heaven  of  Angels. 

.  Hence  is  the  Delight,  yea,  the  happiness  of  the 

Angels  .  .  .  who  are  delighted  -  delectantur  -  with  the 
happiness  of  all  .  .  .  This  is  of  .  .  .  love,  and  this  is  of 
Delight  and  happiness  ...  I  have  been  taught  these 
things  by  those  who  have  perceived  that  heavenly  Delight 
.  .  .  They  thus  acquired  a  perception  of  their  Delight. 


357e.  It  could  not  be  with  a  Delight  like  that  of  the 
others  .  .  . 

359.  That  in  the  harmony  of  a  number  the  Delight 
and  happiness  of  all  is  communicated  to  each. 

381.  That  some  who  are  enemies  of  the  faith  enjoy 
a  certain  external  Delight,  which  they  call  heavenly. 

.  But  their  Delight  is  only  external,  such  as  is  that 

of  the  unfaithful  in  the  world,  and,  in  fact,  still  more 
exalted  ;  but  as  it  is  only  external,  and  fights  against 
internal  or  true  Delight,  like  the  Delights  of  the  un- 
faithful in  the  world  it  comes  to  an  end,  and  is  turned 
into  Undelights  and  pains. 

387.  Instigate  their  cupidities  or  pleasures,  in  which 
they  perceive  the  greatest  Delight ;  they  thus  mingle 
the  Delights  with  the  like  things  as  strike  horror.  .  . 
For  in  proportion  as  they  have  a  sense  of  Delight  of  such 
pleasures,  there  comes  forth  pain  and  horror  .  .  . 

395.  That  Delights  can  be  transmitted  from  one  into 
a  number.  In  the  other  life,  not  only  can  the  Delights 
of  one  be  communicated  with  a  number  of  others  by 
means  of  speech  and  expressions  .  .  .  but  Delights  can 
also  affect  others  by  means  of  a  real  transmission  into 
them  .  . . 

396.  The  flavour  relates  to  the  Delight. 

403.  They  were  instructed  in  a  new  method  of  making 
deliciousnesses  for  Mohammed,  or  of  inducing  Delights, 
which  he  said  he  wanted  to  transmit  to  me  ;  but  it  was 
not  permitted. 

428.  That  there  are  very  many  varieties  of  heavenly 
Delights  and  deliciousnesses,  in  which  there  is  happi- 
ness. Those  are  called  heavenly  Delights  which  come 
forth  sensibly  with  Souls,  as  if  they  were  living  in  the 
body.  There  are  Delights  which  affect  the  wicked  so 
pleasantly  that  they  can  hardly  bear  them.  But  de- 
liciousnesses are  those  which  come  from  a  still  more 
interior  fountain.  In  Delights  there  are  species  of 
happiness  ;  in  deliciousnesses  there  are  species  of  heavenly 
marriage  joy.  In  a  word,  there  are  very  many  degrees 
of  Delights  and  deliciousnesses,  both  as  to  differences, 
and  also  as  to  intensity ;  and  these  Delights  are  communi- 
cable, without  any  diminution  to  those  who  communi- 
cate. True  Delights  and  true  deliciousnesses  have 
happiness  in  them  ;  this  has  peace  in  it,  and  this  has 
innocence.  Thus  true  Delights  and  deliciousnesses 
come  solely  from  God  Messiah  as  their  only  Fount. 

429.  All  other  Delights  are  spurious,  fallacious  ;  such 
as  they  are  in  the  world,  such  they  are  in  the  other  life  ; 
they  can  be  infused  even  by  devils. 

744.  They  who  love  Delight  in  a  perverted  order  of 
life  .  .  . 

1 1 12.  On  the  Delight  of  the  celestials. 

.  The  joy  of  the  celestials  is  a  certain  Delight, 

which  cannot  be  described  .  .  .  for  it  fills  the  whole 
body  with  such  Delight  .  .  .  not  unlike  the  highest 
degree  of  Delight  of  married  partners  in  their  joy,  but 
diffused  from  each  single  least  thing  to  the  more  com- 
posite ones.  But  it  should  be  well  distinguished  whether 
it  comes  from  the  inmost  things,  or  whether  it  subsists 
only  in  external  ones. 


Delighir-yucu/idum 


101 


D  e\\gja.t-Jucutidu  m 


1862.  They  could  counterfeit  something,  as  before 
Delights  ;  but  only  from  the  external  .  .  . 

1926.  When  it  is  granted  ...  to  the  Angels  to  flow 
into  ideas,  there  is  such  a  Delight  of  all  things,  and 
such  a  fulness  of  Delights,  as  can  never  be  told  .  .  . 

1963.  Whence  are  the  diversities  of  Delights. 

.  I  spoke  with  Spirits  concerning  the  origin  and 

nature  of  such  diverse  Delights,  which  are  so  various  as 
to  be  indefinite ;  nay,  some  feel  Delights  in  things 
contrary ;  and  it  was  said  that ...  it  results  from 
harmony  .  .  .  Hence  whatever  results  from  an  acquired 
harmony  is  a  Delight .  .  . 

1964.  It  was  shown  .  .  .  how  Spirits,  from  their  life 
in  the  body,  have  acquired  a  harmony  and  thence  a 
Delight  in  contrary  things,  as  in  contradicting  .  .  .  Thus 
evincing  .  .  .  that  their  life  is  in  acquired  Delights. 

1965.  As  to  heavenly  joys  and  Delights  from  things 
truly  good  and  true,  they  come  from  the  Lord  alone  .  .  . 

e.  The  Angels  are  kept  in  this  heavenly  Delight 

and  persuasion,  which  was  communicated  to  me. 

2461.  On  beauty  and  Delight. 

.   I  spoke  with  Spirits  about  beauty  and  Delight ; 

that  beauty  is  the  form  in  which  and  thence  from  which 
there  is  Delight ;  and  that  Delights  .  .  .  reduced  into  a 
form  are  beauty  ;  and  thus  in  these  and  therefore  from 
them  are  Delights  in  an  interior  degree  .  .  . 

2504.  They  snatch  from  them  all  Delight  .  .  . 

2505.  Such  as  live  for  themselves  were  with  me  for 
some  days  .  .  .  and  they  took  from  me  all  the  Delight 
of  life.  Ex. 

2506.  In  the  bodily  life,  such  want  to  have  Delight ; 
nay,  to  take  away  the  Delight  of  life  from  others  who 
perform  use  .  .  . 

.   It   was   granted   to   say  something   about  the 

Delight  of  life  ;  that  Delight  is  the  life  of  man,  and  that 
they  have  been  so  created  by  the  Lord,  that  they  should 
create  uses  of  Delight  .  .  .  Therefore  Delights  are  added 
to  ■their  use,  which  Delights  are  augmented  entirely 
according  to  use.  .  .  But  they  who  seek  for  Delights, 
without  their  flowing  from  use  .  .  .  then  indeed  Delights 
are  felt,  although  gross  ones  ;  but  as  they  are  not  from 
use,  nor  from  the  Lord  through  use,  they  are  like  these 
filthy  and  hurtful  insects  ;  and  are  such  things  as  destroy 
societies,  and  such  as  destroy  themselves,  because  there 
is  no  spiritual  and  celestial  life  in  their  Delights  ;  there- 
fore they  become  unhappy  .  .  . 

2622,  2623.  Their  delight  -  oblectatio  -  is  such  that 
they  feel  the  mere  Delight,  and  suppose  that  there  is 
nothing  more  delightful  (than  adulteries).  At  this  day 
such  Delight  is  so  general,  that  it  extends  itself  to  little 
children,  who  in  the  bodily  life  have  not  by  actuality 
acquired  Delight  from  such  things,  but  still  have 
received  it  hereditarily.  Thus  also  (it  has  extended 
itself)  to  those  who  are  in  their  first  early  manhood  and 
womanhood  ;  who,  when  affected  by  this  Delight,  also 
suppose  it  to  be  delightful ;  some,  that  it  is  most  delight- 
ful ;  for  in  the  other  life  Delights  are  communicated  : 
there  are  as  it  were  exhalations  of  them.  Yet  if  man- 
kind had  not  been  so  infected  from  heredity,  not  only 
would  they  have  felt  no  Delight  thence,  but  they  would 
have  felt  undelight  and  nausea. 


2624.  But  their  Delight  is  now  turned  into  a 
stench  .  .  . 

2627.  The  bread  set  before  me,  being  cut  into  little 
squares  and  cubes  as  it  were  with  knives,  signified  the 
filthy  Delights,  of  which  I  have  spoken  before,  which 
are  supposed  by  such  as  are  in  the  filthy  Delights  to  be 
heavenly,  when  yet  they  are  infernal. 

2644.  As  such  Delight  (in  adulteries  and  cruelty), 
being  contrary  to  Divine  order,  consumes  itself,  it 
becomes  at  last  so  rotten  and  stinking,  that  they  are  kept 
living  in  a  deadly  stink . .  .  they  sit  in  torment,  deformed, 
like  ugly  skeletons.     2660. 

2841.  As  when  the  delights  of  the  body  and  of  nature 
are  separated  from  their  spiritual  and  celestial  principles. 

2888.  Keeping  me  in  my  more  delightful  thing 
.  .  .     2889. 

2897.  Thus  caused  titillation  and  Delight,  as  is  usu- 
ally the  case  ;  then  he  began  to  feel  his  delights,  with 
such  Delight  from  the  titillation,  that  he  said  he  had 
never  in  his  life  perceived  such  Delight ;  nor  could  he 
have  believed  it  to  be  possible. 

3097.  Delights  and  happinesses  shine  forth  from  each 
single  thing. 

3iooe.  Such  also  wither  and  become  abominations, 
like  other  external  Delights,  which  become  putrid  after 
a  short  time. 

3 1 1 7.  He  knows  nothing  but  what  tends  to  his  Delight 
.  .  .  wherefore  the  Delight  was  represented  by  "as  it  were 
a  yellow  colour  .  .  .  Thus  he  no  longer  desires  to  fall 
into  his  delights  .  .  . 

3197.  They  place  their  delight  and  freedom  in  things 
contrary  ...  I  perceived  how,  by  this  Delight  and  per- 
suasive freedom,  they  remove  themselves  more  and  more 
from  Heaven  .  .  . 

.  He  said  he  would  show  them  the  quality  of  their 

love.  At  first,  what  was  most  delightful  came  to  them 
.  .  .  but  at  last  it  ceased  in  such  horror,  that  they  could 
have  borne  it  no  longer. 

32o6e.  They  prefer  death  to  losing  the  Delight  of  this 
(infernal)  atmosphere. 

3346.  Their  Delight  from  spoils  was  communicated 
to  me. 

3620.  When  I  saw  boys  fighting,  I  perceived  the 
highest  degree  of  Delight  flowing  in  from  certain  Spirits. 

3623.  The  Delights  and  pleasures  are  by  no  means 
denied  to  man. 

.  Such  Delights  of  life  and  happinesses  have  been 

granted  to  me  .  .  . 

3661.  When  in  the  persuasion  that  they  are  gods 
(they  have)  a  delightful  feeling  especially  about  the 
left  breast .  .  .  For  the  persuasion  that  one  is  a  god  .  .  . 
is  attended  with  such  Delight. 

3755e.  From  which  it  is  evident  that  evil  Spirits  are 
employed  to  strengthen  delights,  and  to  appropriate 
them  to  man. 

3782e.  Spirits  are  then  in  their  Delight  or  in  their 
life  ;  for  nothing  is  more  delightful  to  them. 

4243.  When  these  Spirits  came  above  me,  as  soon  as 


"Delight-Jitcundum 


102 


D  eli  gTab-faat/idum 


I  was  reading  something  ...  in  Genesis,  all  the  Delight 
and  life  therefrom  was  taken  away  from  me  .  .  .  When 
I  perceived  that  all  the  Delight  was  filched  from  me 
while  I  was  reading,  it  was  granted  to  speak  to  those 
angelic  Spirits  .  .  .  They  said  .  .  .  that  they  did  not 
know  I  was  there  .  .  .  hut  as  soon  as  they  perceive  any- 
thing delightful,  they  seize  it. 

[D.]  4244.  They  are  above  man,  and  do  not  know  what 
comes  forth  with  him,  but  by  means  of  friendship  of  this 
kind  they  snatch  his  delights  from  him,  and  thus  cause 
undelights  ;  for  the  delights  with  man  which  are 
innocent  are  the  ultimates  in  which  the  delights  of  the 
Angels  terminate ;  wherefore,  when  angelic  Spirits 
favour  themselves  above  others,  they  draw  away  the 
delights  from  the  man  to  themselves. 

4270.  That  Spirits  take  away  delights. 

— .  I  had  been  in  delights,  as  in  the  delights  of 
writing,  but  they  were  taken  away,  and  I  was  in  unde- 
light,  and  it  was  said  that  there  were  Spirits  in  front 
above,  who  were  taking  away  these  delights,  and  yet  were 
not  aware  that  they  were  doing  so.  .  .  They  willed  well 
only  to  then-  companions,  with  whom  they  communi- 
cated delight ;  and  they  are  such,  that  wherever  there 
is  any  natural  delight,  they  take  it  away  ;  but  they  are 
not  so  well  able  to  take  away  heavenly  delight  .  .  . 

.  They  who  are  in  hatreds  draw  to  themselves 

the  delights  of  another  by  this,  that  they  feel  delight 
from  the  fact  that  the  other  is  deprived  of  it.  They 
who  are  such  .  .  .  that  they  want  only  to  enjoy  the 
delight  of  another,  are  not  tolerated  with  man.  .  .  But 
everyone  appropriates  to  himself  the  delight  of  another 
according  to  his  own  nature  ;  they  who  do  not  do  it 
according  to  their  own  nature,  but  want  to  put  on  the 
nature  of  him  who  has  the  delight,  in  order  that  so 
they  may  have  it,  are  cast  out,  for  this  is  infamous. 

4439.  High  above  the  head  there  are  Societies  which 
are  to  be  called  Societies  of  Friendship.  They  live  .  .  . 
in  the  delight  of  friendship  ;  not  in  the  delight  and 
blessedness  of  mutual  love.  They  have  .  .  .  very  many 
delights  .  .  .  with  other  delicious  things.  .  .  It  was 
granted  to  perceive  whence  was  their  delight.  "Wherever 
they  come,  they  draw  to  themselves  the  delights  of 
others,  and  they  whom  they  deprive  are  then  in  what 
is  obscure  and  miserable  .  .  .  They  thus  took  my  delight 
away  from  me,  and  I  was  then  in  what  was  obscure  and 
sad,  which  was  augmented  in  proportion  to  the  delight 
with  them.  .  .  I  was  informed,  that  such  is  the  delight 
of  friendship  when  it  is  not  the  delight  of  mutual  love. 
Hence  it  may  be  evident  how  the  case  is  in  the  other 
life  with  those  who  love  their  companions  .  .  .  for  the 
sake  of  delight  .  .  . 

4440.  On  infernal  and  heavenly  delight. 

.  A  certain  doctor  ...  in  the  other  life  could  not 

at  all  understand  what  is  infernal  delight  and  what  is 
heavenly  delight,  although  he  was  instructed  ...  In 
his  idea  he  made  infernal  delight  and  heavenly  delight 
entirely  as  one  ;  he  was  an  interior  hypocrite  .  .  . 

4471.  When  they  go  beyond  the  delight  of  their  own 
life,  they  are  punished  .  .  . 

2.  They  are  then  remitted  among  themselves  (in 

Hell)  into  the  delights  .  .  . 

4494e.  The  delight  he  had  in  the  deed  was  communi- 


cated to  me  ;  his  delight  was  devoid  of  any  symptom  of 
horror. 

4532.  "With  the  evil  there  is  only  the  delight  of 
cupidities,  and  with  the  good  the  delight  of  affection, 
which  carries  them  away.  Unless  the  delight  of  the 
evil  is  broken,  although  they  may  have  the  best  gift  of 
understanding,  it  effects  nothing  ;  their  delight  is  their 
life. 

4538.  There  are  other  magical  arts  ...  by  entering 
into  the  delights  of  others,  keeping  the  disposition  in 
them,  and  thus  driving  to  these  things. 

4548.  All  their  delight  is  in  company,  etc. 

.  In  the  other  life,  everyone  receives  delight  and 

blessedness  according  to  use  .  .  . 

4552. 'There  were  some  of  the  worst  sort  of  Sirens, 
who  came  while  I  was  writing,  because  they  could  thus 
draw  the  delight  to  themselves,  and  deprive  me  of 
it  .  .  . 

4582.  They  appear  friends,  but  their  inmost  delight 
is  to  do  harm  .  .  . 

e.  Such  great  delight  is  there  in  doing  evil,  that 

although  they  see  a  gulf  of  Hell  before  them,  and  know 
that  they  can  never  emerge  thence,  still  the  delight  of 
evil  so  carries  them  away,  that  they  do  not  desist ;  for 
the  delight  of  doing  evil  is  their  life. 

5759§-  Afterwards,  they  were  cast  out  who  perceived 
delight  in  the  fact  that  others  were  suffering  .  .  .  e. 

5791  j.  A  great  part  of  them  ran  about,  wherever  they 
could  find  delight  .  .  .  like  the  Societies  of  Friendship, 
and  drew  it  to  themselves,  whence  others  who  had 
delight  from  uses  and  in  their  duties  were  reduced  into 
a  miserable  state. 

5792J.  They  almost  all  had  delight  in  domineering 
and  getting  rich,  and  none  of  them  in  use  .  .  . 

.   They  who  are  delighted-delectantur-vrith.  good 

use  .  .  .  are  in  spiritual  delight,  which  delight  infinitely 
transcends  the  other  .  .  . 

5830e.  It  was  found  that  they  had  no  delight  but  in 
doing  harm  to  everyone  whom  they  saw  .  .  . 

5849.  Their  delight  from  ratiocination  was  communi- 
cated to  a  Celestial  Angel,  and  he  then  said,  that  their 
delight  was  so  absurd  that  he  could  not  describe  it ; 
but  it  was  said,  that  this  is  their  delight,  and  that 
everyone  is  left  to  his  own  delight. 

5873.  Their  delight  is  to  be  one  with  the  infesters, 
and  to  do  harm  to  the  good  ;  this  delight  is  in  them  ; 
wherefore  they  perceive  delight  as  soon  as  they  are 
above  them,  a  delight  they  do  not  know  the  source  of, 
but  it  is  the  delight  of  doing  harm  .  .  . 

D.  Min.  4610.  Principles  of  truth  change  and  break 
the  cupidities  or  delights  of  evil .  .  .  Wrhen  I  was  in  an 
affection  of  evil,  and  principles  of  truth  were  inwardly 
insinuated,  these  delights  began  to  cease ;  thus,  also, 
they  were  Known  to  be  evils. 

4614.  Better  still  when  he  has  contracted  a  habit, 
and  has  begun  to  shun  the  delights  of  evil,  and  to  be 
averse  to  them  ;  but  it  is  a  work  of  time  .  .  .  Thus  to 
alter  the  delights  is  a  work  of  much  time  .  .  . 

4637.  "When  what  is  holy  and  good  from  the  Lord .  .  . 
falls  into  (man's)  delight  of  life,  it  is  like  hidden  seed  in 


D  e\ig$l\,—Jiic7mdum 


103 


D  eli  ght-fa amda  m 


the  ground  ;  if  the  delight  is  pride  or  self-love,  it  falls 
into  evil  ground  .  .  .  But  if  it  falls  into  the  delight  of 
charity  ...  it  falls  into  good  ground  .  .  .  The  affection 
itself  is  the  ground,  the  quality  of  which  is  only  per- 
ceived from  the  man's  delight. 

4716.  How  the  Societies  of  Friendship  withdraw  the 
delights  from  others.  Gen. art. 

4749.  (These  two  Genii)  took  away  all  my  delight 
and  pleasantness  ;  this  was  their  intention  .  .  .  Their 
delight  was  contrary  to  that  of  Heaven  ;  they  said  that 
if  this  were  the  case  they  did  not  want  to  come  thither. 
It  was  afterwards  granted  to  speak  with  them  ahout 
their  lot,  that  such  delight  is  taken  away  from  them, 
and  then  they  become  most  stupid,  because  their  delight 
inwardly  gives  them  that  skill  and  clearsightedness ; 
and  that  afterwards,  when  they  will  sit  in  torment, 
until  that  delight  is  extinguished,  if  they  have  anything 
of  good  in  the  residue,  this  will  remain  .  .  . 

4750.  It  is  thus  given  from  contraries  to  perceive 
more  delight  and  pleasantness  .  .  . 

.  They  said  that  they  wanted  to  abstain,  but  it 

was  answered  that  they  could  not,  because  when  they 
are  in  their  delight  they  are  lulled  ;  thus  they  are  not 
able  to  will  and  think  except  from  that  delight ;  delight 
is  attended  with  lulling. 

4774.  As  he  thus  went  beyond  the  limits  of  his 
delight,  he  was  grievously  punished  .  .  .  Being  again 
left,  he  first  began  cautiously  to  think  of  revenge,  then 
more  aud  more,  until  at  last  he  came  into  the  delight 
of  revenge  .  .  . 

E.  15.  'The  things  which  are  written  therein '  —  from 
the  love  of  truth,  or  from  the  delight  of  that  love  ;  for 
that  which  takes  place  from  love  takes  place  from  delight ; 
from  no  other  source  is  there  delight. 

22.  'Grace  be  unto  you  and  peace' =  the  delight  of 
truth  and  good.  'Grace'  =  the  delight  of  truth;  and 
'  peace' =  the  delight  of  the  good  of  innocence  and  of 
love.  Ex. 

2.  Whether  you  say  the  affection  of  truth,  or  the 

delight  of  truth,  it  is  the  same  ;  for  affection  without 
delight  does  not  exist. 

122.  The  falsities  which  take  captive  rise  up  from  the 
Hell  in  the  natural  man,  when  the  delights  of  the  love 
of  self  and  the  world  have  dominion  there  ;  for  these 
delights  are  the  origins  of  all  evils  and  thence  falsities. 

2.  Hell  .  .  .  thus  affects  all  who  are  in  the  delights 

of  these  loves  .  .  . 

146.  To  those  who  overcome  in  temptations  will  be 
given  the  delight  of  celestial  love  from  the  Lord's  Divine 
Human.  Sig. 

3.  It  is  called  'the  hidden  manna'  because  the 

delight  of  celestial  love  ...  is  quite  unknown  to  those 
who  are  in  love  not  celestial ;  and  no  one  can  receive 
this  delight,  except  he  who  acknowledges  the  Lord's 
Divine  Human ;  for  from  this  it  proceeds.  As  this 
delight  was  unknown  to  the  Sons  of  Israel  in  the 
wilderness,  they  called  it  'manna.'  .  .  The  reason  this 
delight,  meant  by  'manna,'  was  unknown  to  the  Sons 
of  Israel,  was  that  they  were  in  corporeal  delight  above 
all  nations  ;  and  they  who  are  in  this  delight,  are  quite 
unable  to  know  anything  of  heavenly  delight.     It  is 


said  delight,  and  there  is  meant  the  delight  of  love  ; 
for  all  the  delight  of  life  is  of  love. 

°.  This  delight  is  also  described  by  correspond- 
ences in  Ex.  xvi.  31  ;  Num.xi.7,8  .  .  .  ' honey '  =  its  exter- 
nal delight;  'oil,'  that  love  itself;  and  its  'juice,' 
whence  was  the  flavour,  its  internal  delight ;  and  the 
rain  with  the  dew,  in  which  the  manna  was,  the  influx 
of  Divine  truth  in  which  is  that  delight. 

159.  'That  woman  Jezebel'  =  the  delight  of  the  love 
of  self  and  the  world.   Ex. 

2.  Something  shall  be  said  about  the  delight  of 

man's  loves  .  .  .  All  the  delight  of  his  life  is  from  his 
love  ;  for  whatever  favours  his  love  he  perceives  delight- 
ful, and  whatever  is  averse  to  his  love  he  perceives 
undelightful ;  therefore,  whether  it  is  said  that  man  is 
such  as  his  love,  or  that  he  is  such  as  the  delight  of  his 
life,  it  is  the  same.  They,  therefore,  who  are  in  the 
loves  of  self  and  the  world  .  .  .  have  no  other  delight  of 
life,  or  no  other  life,  than  infernal  life  ;  for  these  loves, 
or  the  delights  of  life  from  them,  which  are  perpetual, 
turn  all  their  thoughts  and  intentions  to  themselves  and 
the  world  .  .  .  Hence  it  is,  that  after  being  loosed  from 
the  body,  man's  Spirit  ...  is  actually  turned  to  its 
love,  because  this  makes  the  delight  of  his  life,  that  is, 
his  life. 

1622.  They  who  falsify  truths  by  applying  them  to' 
the  delight  of  self-love,  do  not  afterwards  turn  to  truths 
...  If  man  suffers  the  natural  delight  to  predominate, 
which  is  the  delight  of  the  love  of  self  and  the  world, 
he  then  sees  all  things  from  this  delight. 

2292.  A  sense  which  has  no  relation  to  sight,  but  to 
another  Sensitive  which  is  called  the  Sensitive  of  delight. 
This  delight,  being  spiritual,  and  above  the  sense  of 
natural  delight,  man  does  not  perceive,  except  when  . .  . 
regenerated. 

3.  When  the  delight  of  affection  passes  from  the 

will  into  the  thought,  it  forms  itself,  and  in  various 
forms  presents  itself  to  view. 

336s.  One  delight  of  affection  may  be  presented  by 
means  of  a  number  of  ideas  of  thought,  and  be  expressed 
by  various  things  in  speech  ;  the  delight  of  affection  is 
what  is  called  good. 

411.  They  have  rest  in  their  evils  and  falsities,  because 
these  have  been  their  delights ;  for  the  delights  of 
everyone's  life  remain  after  death  :  the  delights  of  life 
are  the  delights  of  their  loves  ;  for  every  delight  of  life 
is  of  the  love. 

2.  They  do  not  want  to  recede  from  the  delights 

of  their  loves  ;  they  thence  have  anguish  and  torment, 
which  cease  when  they  come  into  the  Hells  where  similar 
delights  or  similar  loves  reign. 

619.  '  In  thy  mouth  sweet  as  honey  '  =  exterior  delight. 
.  .  .  'Sweet  as  honey'  =  the  delight  of  natural  good. 

660.  Delights  from  infernal  love  with  those  who  are 
against  the  goods  and  truths- of  the  Church.  Sig. 

661.  Nothing  is  more  delightful  to  the  wicked  than 
to  destroy  the  goods  of  love  and  the  truths  of  doctrine, 
wherever  they  are  ;  and  to  do  evil  to  those  with  whom 
they  are  .  .  .  Whenever  it  is  permitted  to  do  evil  they 
are  in  the  delight  of  their  heart. 

695.    'Reward'  properly  means  that  delight,  joyous- 


Delight-Jucundum 


104 


Delight-Jucundum 


ness,  and  blessedness  which  is  in  the  love  of  good  and 
truth  .  .  . 

[E.]  7582.  All  the  delights  of  life  are  delights  of  the 
loves  ;  the  delights  of  the  loves  of  self  and  the  world 
are  delights  of  hatred  of  various  kinds  ;  whereas  the 
delights  of  love  to  the  Lord  and  towards  the  neighbour 
are  delights  of  charity  of  various  kinds  ;  and  these  are 
diametrically  opposed  to  each  other  ;  and  all  they  who 
are  in  the  Hells,  do  all  that  they  do  from  the  delights 
of  their  loves  .  .  .  This  hatred  is  deadly,  and  is  the 
delight  itself  of  the  life  of  evil  Spirits.  But  such  delight 
is  turned  into  infernal  horrors. 

9812.  The  delight  of  adultery  is  Hell  with  man,  and 
the  delight  of  marriage  is  Heaven  with  him  ;  conse- 
quently, in  proportion  as  a  man  is  in  the  one  delight, 
he  is  not  in  the  other. 

9902.  The  difference  between  the  love  of  marriage  and 
the  love  of  adultery  is  as  that  between  Heaven  and 
Hell ;  similar  is  the  difference  between  the  delights  of 
these  loves  ;  for  delights  draw  all  that  they  have  from 
the  loves  from  which  they  are.  The  delights  of  the 
love  of  adultery  draw  all  that  they  have  from  the 
delights  of  doing  evil  uses  .  .  .  and  the  delights  of  the 
love  of  marriage  from  the  delights  of  doing  good  uses 
.  .  .  Such,  therefore,  as  is  the  delight  which  the  evil 
have  in  doing  harm,  such  is  the  delight  of  their  love  of 
adultery  .  .  .  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  the  delight  of 
adultery  ascends  from  the  lowest  Hell.  But  the  delight 
of  the  love  of  marriage,  being  from  the  love  of  the 
conjunction  of  good  and  truth,  and  from  the  love  of 
doing  good,  is  heavenly  delight,  and  descends  from  the 
inmost  Heaven.  .  .  It  is,  however,  believed  that  the 
delight  of  marriage  and  the  delight  of  adultery  are 
similar  .  .  .  but  no  one  can  feel  the  difference  except  him 
who  is  in  the  delight  of  marriage  love  :  he  who  is  in 
this  delight,  most  clearly  feels  that  in  the  delight  of 
marriage  there  is  not  anything  impure  or  unchaste  .  .  . 
and  that  in  the  delight  of  adultery  there  is  nothing  but 
what  is  impure,  unchaste,  and  lascivious  .  .  .  But  he 
who  is  in  the  delight  of  adultery,  cannot  feel  these 
things  .  .  . 

3.  As,    outwardly,    the   delights   of   both   loves 

appear  similar  ...  it  is  provided  by  the  Lord,  that  the 
delights  of  adultery  should  not  ascend  into  Heaven,  and 
that  the  delights  of  marriage  should  not  descend  into 
Hell.  There  is  some  correspondence  of  Heaven  with 
prolification  in  adulteries,  but  not  with  the  Delight 
itself  in  them. 

99 12.  The  love  of  prolificating,  in  which  is  all  Delight 
and  pleasure  .  .  .  The  love  of  prolification  in  adulteries, 
in  which  is  all  Delight  and  pleasure.  The  reason  why 
there  is  all  Delight  and  pleasure  in  the  love  of  prolifi- 
cating, is  that  all  delight,  pleasure,  blessedness,  happi- 
ness, in  the  universal  Heaven  and  in  the  universal 
world,  is  collected  into  the  ...  act  of  producing  uses  .  .  . 
Hence,  also,  is  the  pleasure  and  Delight  of  adultery  ; 
but  since  prolification  by  it  corresponds  to  the  production 
of  evil  by  falsity  and  of  falsity  from  evil,  that  pleasure 
and  delight  by  degrees  decreases  .  .  .  until  at  last  it  is 
turned  into  loathing.  .  .  The  delight  of  adultery  is  from 
some  impure  fire  which  while  it  lasts  counterfeits  the 
delight  of  the  love  of  good  ;  but  in  itself  is  the  delight 


of  the  love  of  evil,  which  in  its  essence  is  the  delight  of 
hatred  .  .  . 

5.  By  turns  .  .  .  they  feel  the  delight  of  hatred 

as  the  delight  of  love  ;  but  this  from  the  itch  of  the 
flesh. 

6.  The  nature  of  the  delight  of  hatred,  and  thence 

of  doing  harm,  with  those  who  are  in  Hell,  cannot  be 
described,  nor  believed  .  .  .  Their  delight  of  doing  harm 
derives  all  it  has  from  hatred  and  revenge  against  what 
is  good  and  true  ...  It  is  therefore  the  delight  of  hatred 
which  in  the  extremes  has  become  fiery,  injected  into 
the  lascivious  flesh,  which  in  a  moment  becomes  the 
delight  of  adultery  .  .  . 

992s.  This  fire  is  kindled  .  .  .  from  the  delight  of 
doing  good  .  .  .  This  fire  is  full  of  innumerable  delights, 
as  many  as  are  the  Delights  and  blessednesses  of  Heaven 
.  .  .  The  origin  of  these  Delights  is  from  this,  that 
married  partners  want  to  be  united  into  one.     9932. 

9932.  As  marriage  love  is  the  fundamental  of  all  the 
loves  of  Heaven,  it  is  also  the  fundamental  of  all  the 
delights  and  joys  of  Heaven  ;  for  all  delight  and  joy  is 
of  love. 

10104.  The  delights  of  varieties  .  .  .  are  also  delights 
of  adultery ;  for  the  delight  of  variety  destroys  the 
delight  of  marriage.  The  delight  of  defloration  ...  is 
also  the  delight  of  adultery  .  .  . 

1 1 89s.  This  love  (of  exercising  command)  is  Known 
from  its  delight ;  for  it  surpasses  every  delight  of  the 
life  of  men  ;  it  continually  exhales  from  Hell .  .  . 

J. (Post.)  245.  The  delight  of  the  love  of  exercising 
command  has  a  sweetness  in  it  which  is  ineffable  .  .  . 
This  delight  is  turned  into  horrors.  It  is  the  same 
with  the  love  of  doing  harm,  with  the  love  of  hatred 
and  revenge,  of  theft,  and  with  the  love  of  adultery  and 
their  delights.  Man  does  not  know  that  when,  by 
reformation  from  the  Lord,  these  delights  recede,  there 
first  enter  the  delights  of  Heaven,  which  infinitely 
transcend  them  ;  nor  that  then  the  delights  of  these 
evils  are  undelightful  and  sting.     246. 

350.  On  the  delight  from  the  glory  of  being  wise, 
and  on  the  delight  of  exercising  command. 

D.  Love  xii2.  According  to  these  (activities)  there 
flow  in  with  (the  Angels)  the  necessary,  useful,  and 
delightful  things  of  life.     . 

3.  The  delightful  things  of  life  are  those  with 

the  married  partner,  with  friends  .  .  . 

C.  189.  There  are  diversions  of  charity,  which  are  the 
various  Delights  and  pleasantnesses  of  the  bodily  senses, 
useful  for  mental  recreation.  Gen.  art. 

191.  Hence 
nesses. 


have  they  their  Delights  and  pleasant- 


193.  Sweetness,  by  which  is  meant  spiritual  delight. 
Pleasantness  is  said  of  wisdom  .  .  .  and  delight  of 
love  ... 

194.  They  may  also  feel  a  delight  in  the  work  of 
their  calling ;  but  it  is  an  infernal  delight.  To  their 
eyes  it  may  counterfeit  heavenly  delight ;  for  they  are 
both  alike  outwardly.  But  their  delight  is  full  of  what 
is  undelightful  .  .  . 

195.  The  uses    they   perform  .  .  .  are    pleasant    and 


Delight 


105 


Delirium 


delightful  to  them,  as  ordure  is  to  swine,  or  mice  to 
cats.  .  .  There  is  an  infernal  delight  and  pleasantness 
in  their  diversions  .  .  . 

De  Conj.  104.  When  anyone  passes  from  marriage 
love  into  its  opposite,  the  delight  appearing  almost  the 
same,  such  a  dog  is  presented,  guarding  lest  the  opposite 
Delights  should  communicate. 

105.  Peace  in  the  Heavens  is  like  Spring  in  the 
world,  which  delights  and  vivifies  all  things ;  it  is 
heavenly  delight  itself  in  its  own  essence. 

Can.  God.vii.  10a.  Eternal  blessedness,  happinesses, 
and  Delights  are  the  ends  of  creation  ;  because  they  are 
of  love. 

Delight.      Oblertare,  Oblectamentum. 

A.  I492e.  Grief  that  the  scientifics  should  be  destroyed 
which  he  had  imbibed  with  delight  and  deliciousnesses. 

270215.  '  The  living  soul  that  creepeth '  =  their  delights. 

H.  87.  Worldly  things  .  .  .  delight  the  genius ; 
spiritual  things  .  .  .  delight  the  mind. 

i85e.  These  things  delight  their  minds  more  than 
their  eyes.     i86e. 

S.  403.  'To  delight  himself  splendidly  every  day' 
(Luke  xvi.  19)  =  their  delight-oWecto£io-that  they  had 
and  read  the  Word. 

P.  113.  Delights  delight  the  thoughts,  and  take 
away  reflections. 

M.  54.  Occasions  of  social  intercourse,  which  exhilarate 
the  minds  of  the  Angels,  delight  their  dispositions, 
delight-jucundant-theiv  bosoms,  and  recreate  their 
bodies.  .  .  From  these  (uses)  is  the  soul  and  life  in  all 
their  gladnesses  and  delights. 

2674.  They  delight  themselves  foolishly  as  with  the 
possession  of  the  universe. 

268s.  Our  visionary  delight  comes  on  us  by  alterna- 
tions .  .  . 


D.  2438.  Their  greatest  delight  is  to  punish  ;  where- 
fore from  the  general  company  of  the  malignant  there 
flows  such  a  delight  from  cupidity  into  fewer  ;  and  thus 
into  those  who  treat  him  badly  .  .  . 

2450.  They  said  that  it  was  on  account  of  their 
delight  at  the  sight  of  money  .  .  . 

2572.  Should  they  die  before  their  eyes,  they  hence 
derive  delight. 

2622.  Their  delight  is  such,  that  they  feel  the  mere 
felight-jucunditatem. 

2712.  With  such  delight  are  they  affected,  that  their 
delight  from  such  things  surpasses  every  other  delight. 

Delineate.     Deliniare. 

Delineation.     Delineame?itum,  Delineatio. 

A  5726.  It  is  allowable  to  call  the  delineations  of 
the  first  stamina  vessels  .  .  . 

W.  432s.  With  a  subtle  delineation  of  somewhat  of 
a  face  in  front .  .  .  Something  delineated  for  a  face 
appeared.     D.Wis.iii.4. 

D.  574.  Sees  the  things  delineated. 


E.  33 15.  'A  nation  meted  out  and  trodden  down' 
(Is.xviii.2)  =  those  with  whom  goods  have  been  (taken 
away,  changed,  or  perverted). 

Delirium.     Delirium,  Ddiratio. 
Rave.     Delirare. 

A.  18802.  They  would  have  thought  tbem  deliriums 
of  the  disposition  .  .  . 

2796s2.  They  who  are  in  the  deliriums  of  wisdom  .  .  . 

9278s.  Hence  it  may  be  known  .  .  .  who  are  foolish 
and  delirious  .  .  .  Such  are  more  delirious  and  foolish 
than  the  rest .  .  . 

C.  J.  62.  They  have  a  delirium  like  that  of  those  in 
a  malignant  fever  .  .  . 

63e.  Lest  they  should  be  carried  away  into  fantastic 
deliriums,  such  as  prevailed  in  the  above-mentioned 
Hell.  In  such  deliriums  are  they  who  had  sought  to  be 
made  saints  .  .  . 

W.  4272.  They  .  .  .  say,  This  man  raves. 

P.  i85e.  They  then  come  into  such  a  delirium  as  to 
acknowledge  the  more  powerful  devils  for  their  gods  .  .  . 

I90e.  Find  arguments  of  their  delirium  in  favour  of 
nature  .  .  . 

227s.  They  are  like  mere  fantastic  deliriums. 

M.  48ae.  A  good  man  .  .  .  who  from  the  allurements 
of  the  world  has  sometimes  raved  in  the  external .  .  . 

212.  By  insanity  is  meant  a  delirium-deliratio-oi  the 
mind  from  falsities ;  and  a  pre-eminent  Aelirium-deliratio 
-is  the  delirium-  deliratio-of  the  mind  from  truths 
falsified  uutil  they  are  believed  to  be  wisdom. 

267s.  They  are  thus  kept  in  a  state  of  intelligence  in 
externals,  however  they  may  interiorly  rave  and  craze. 

4.  Into  this  delirium  every  man  is  let  after  death, 

who  has  abstracted  his  spirit  from  the  body,  and  has  not 
wanted  to  recede  from  the  deliciousness  of  the  delirium 
by  thinking  something  from  religion  .  .  . 

T.  42.  It  is  said  a  frenzy,  because  the  minds  of  men 
have  been  driven  by  it  into  such  a  delirium,  that  they 
do  not  know  whether  there  is  one  God  or  three. 

23.  Spiritual  things  ...  the  natural  man  calls 
deliriums.     381. 

3 12.  If  he  should  persist  in  penetrating  into  these 
things,  he  might  easily  fall  into  a  delirium  .  .  . 

562.  How  they  rave  ,  who  think  .  .  .  that  God  can 
condemn  anyone  .  .  . 

57e.  If  both  wills  should  act  at  once,  delirium  or 
dizziness  would  invade  his  mind. 

90.  Thus  they  may  fill  the  Church  with  deliriums 
and  trifles. 

1833.  Such  things  are  deliriums  of  the  mind  concern- 
ing God. 

482e.  The  Angels  ...  call  the  denial  of  (free-will) 
delirium  upon  delirium. 


D.  244.  If  heavenly  estates  were  expounded  to  man 
.  .  .  they  would  draw  him  away  into  deliriums  .  .  . 

3486e.  He  took  away  all  their  understanding  of  truth 
and  good,  they  as  it  were  raving  .  .  . 


Deliver 


106 


Deliver 


[D.]  3625.  Hence  come  the  deliriums  of  many  ;  also 
insanity  .  .  . 

4572.  (How  the  delirium  of  fevers  is  caused.) 
5936.  They  begin  to  rave  as  to  the  thoughts  .  .  . 

E.  1 1 58s.  These  (profaners)  are  altogether  deliriums 
of  phantasy. 

D.  Love  xv2.  Lest  they  should  wander  into  the 
deliriums  of  their  cupidities  .  .  . 

Deliver.    See  ~B~&AV.-parere  ;  and  Pronounce. 

Deliver.     Liberare. 
Deliverance.    Libemtio. 
Deliverer.     Liberator. 

See  under  Rescue. 

See  also  FRW-liber. 

A.  9052.  When  he  is  delivered,  that  is,  regenerated .  .  . 

1655.  That  the  rational  man  .  .  .  liberated-vindicavit 
and  delivered  him.  Tr. 

1713.  All  things  in  the  external  man,  before  he  is 
delivered  and  liberated,  are  called  servants. 

1 85 1.  Deliverance.  Sig.  .  .  'To  go  out'  =  to  be 
delivered. 

2025e.  He  \ibersbtod-vindicavit-the  World  of  Spirits 
from  infernal  Genii  and  Spirits,  and  thus  delivered  the 
human  race  from  destruction  .  .  .  therefore  He  is  called 
'the  Deliverer,'  and  'the  Redeemer'  .  .  . 

22424.  'Visitation'  .  .  .  signifies  either  vastation  .  .  . 
or  deliverance,  thus  exploration. 

276S.  God  tempts  no  man,  [but]  is  continually  de- 
livering from  temptations,  so  far  .  .  .  as  deliverance 
does  not  cause  evil. 

2769e.  He  is  here  called  'Jehovah,'  because  it  treats 
of  deliverance  ;  for  from  truth  is  all  temptation  and 
condemnation,  but  from  good  is  all  deliverance  and 
alvation. 

2825.  Deliverance  (after  temptation).  Sig. 

2833.  'Abraham  went  and  took  the  ram'  =  their  de- 
liverance by  virtue  of  the  Lord's  Divine  Human.  .  .  He 
took  the  ram  that  was  held  back  in  the  thicket  by  its 
horns  — the  deliverance  of  the  spiritual  by  virtue  of  the 
Lord's  Divine  Human. 

2954.  Redemption  is  reformation  aud  regeneration, 
and  thence  deliverance  from  Hell,  and  salvation. 

3603.  'To  break  his  yoke  from  off  thy  neck'  =  deliver- 
ance .  .  .  from  shutting  up  and  interception  .  .  . 

4299.  '  I  have  seen  God  faces  to  faces,  and  my  soul  is 
delivered'  (Gen.xxxii.3o)  =  that  He  endured  the  most 
grievous  temptations,  as  if  they  were  from  the  Divine. 

4732.  'He  rescued  (Joseph)  out  of  their  hand'  = 
deliverance. 

5 1 34.  '  Bring  me  out  of  this  house '  =  deliverance  from 
evils.     'To  bring  out '  =  deliverance. 

.  The  interior  Natural  ...  is  then  delivered  from 

the  evils  by  which  the  Celestial  .  .  .  was  estranged. 

5249.  How  Joseph  was  delivered  from  the  pit  {i.e.  the 
prison)  .  .  .  His  being  called  out  of  the  pit  to  Pharaoh  = 
a  state  of  deliverance  from  temptations. 


53982.  Man  is  such  evil,  that  to  eternity  he  cannot  be 
fully  delivered,  even  from  one  sin  .  .  . 

5899.  'To  a  great  going  out '  =  deliverance  from 
damnation  .  .  .  which  deliverance  is  effected  by  means 
of  remains. 

6279.  The  Lord's  Divine  Human  by  which  there  is 
deliverance  from  Hell.  Sig.  .  .  '  To  redeem  '  =  to  deliver. 

6280.  He  redeemed  man,  that  is,  delivered  him 
from  Hell. 

2.  This  deliverance  is  what  is  called  Redemption  ; 

and  the  Divine  Human  itself,  which  delivered  or  re- 
deemed, is  called  'the  Angel  that  redeems.' 

6368.  'From  the  prey  my  son  thou  hast  gone  up'  = 
that  by  the  Lord  through  the  Celestial  is  the  deliver- 
ance of  many  from  Hell.  'To  go  up  from  the  prey'  = 
deliverance  from  Hell.  Ex.  .  .  This  plucking  away  and 
deliverance  is  what  is  called  'the  prey  ; '  and  as  this  is 
effected  from  the  Lord's  Divine  Good,  it  is  said,  that  by 
the  Lord  through  the  Celestial  is  the  deliverance  of 
many  from  Hell.  ■    ■    • 

2.  But  no  one  can  be  plucked  away  and  delivered 

from  Hell,  unless  in  the  bodily  life  he  has  been  in 
spiritual  good  .  .  .  Hence  such  cannot  be  plucked  away 
or  delivered  from  Hell  .  .  . 

6413.  Deliverance  from  a  state  of  temptations  is  what 
is  compared  to  'a  hind  let  loose'  .  .  . 

6441.  'A  wolf '  =  the  avidity  of  releasing  and  deliver- 
ing the  good. 

6442.  When  the  Lord  is  present,  there  is  the  release 
and  deliverance  of  the  good. 

65S83.  'To  be  visited'  .  .  .  here  stands  for  the  deliver- 
ance of  the  Sons  of  Israel. 

4.   '  To  visit '  =  to  deliver. 

6753.  'Because  I  have  drawn  him  out  of  the  waters' 
=  deliverance  from  falsities.  .  .  'To  draw  out'  =  deliver- 
ance. .  .  In  these  words  is  signified  .  .  .  that  the  Lord, 
in  order  that  He  might  become  the  Divine  Law  as  to  the 
Human,  delivered  it  from  all  the  falsity  which  adhered 
to  His  Human  from  the  mother. 

6784.  'An  Egyptian  man  hath  delivered  us  from  the 
hands  of  the  shepherds'  (Ex.ii.  19)  — that  the  scientific 
truth  which  is  adjoined  to  the  Church  prevailed  over  the 
power  of  the  doctrine  of  falsity  from  evil.  .  .  'To  deliver' 
=  to'prevail ;  for  he  who  delivers  from  the  hand  of  others, 
prevails  over  them. 

6825.  In  this  chapter  it  treats  of  the  deliverance  (of 
those  who  are  of  the  Church)  ;  and  then  they  are  in- 
structed who  the  God  is  that  has  delivered  them,  that 
it  is  the  Lord. 

6854.  'I  have  come  down  to  deliver  him  from  the 
hand  of  the  Egyptians'  (Ex.iii.8)  =  that  He  let  Himself 
down  to  them  to  release  them  from  the  power  of  false 
scientifics.  .  .  'To  deliver'  =  to  release  .  .  .  for  he  who 
releases  from  falsities,  delivers. 

68642.  In  what  follows,  it  treats  of  the  deliverance  of 
the  Sons  of  Israel,  that  is,  of  those  who  are  of  the  Lord's 
Spiritual  Church,  from  falsities  ;  from  which  they  cannot 
possibly  be  delivered,  except  by  the  Holy  which  proceeds 
from  the  Lord. 

6865.   'Bring  forth  my  people  the  Sons  of  Israel  out 


Deliver 


107 


Deliver 


of  Egypt' =  the  deliverance  thereby  of  those  who  are  of 
the  Spiritual  Church  'from  the  falsities  which  are  in- 
festing them.  'To  bring  forth '  =  deliverance.  6868. 
7235-  7932^. 

6897.  'I  will  make  you  ascend  from  the  affliction,  of 
Egypt' =  elevation  and  deliverance  from  infestation  by 
false  scientifics.  '  To  make  to  ascend '  =  elevation  towards 
interior  things  .  .  .  Hence,  also,  it  =  deliverance. 

6912.  'Afterwards  he  will  let  you  go'  =  the  driving 
away  of  those  who  are  in  falsities,  and  the  deliverance 
of  those  who  are  in  truths.  .  .  'To  let  go '  =  driving  away, 
and  thence  deliverance. 

6939.  Continuation  in  this  chapter  (Ex.iv. )  concerning 
the  deliverance  of  those  who  are  of  the  Spiritual  Church. 

6945.  It  here  treats  in  the  spiritual  sense  of  the 
deliverance  of  those  who  are  of  the  Spiritual  Church, 
who  were  delivered  by  means  of  the  Advent  of  the  Lord 
into  the  world.  Refs.     7445. 

6988s.  All  the  miracles  performed  by  the  Lord  signify 
.  .  .  that  those  were  then  delivered  from  Hell  who  re- 
ceived the  faith  of  charity. 

7032.  Stubbornness,  and  thus  no  deliverance  as 
yet.  Sig. 

7066.  'Jehovah  hath  visited  the  Sons  of  Israel' =  that 
those  of  the  Spiritual  Church  were  delivered  and  saved 
by  means  of  the  Advent  of  the  Lord.  'To  visit' =  de- 
verance  by  means  of  the  Advent  of  the  Lord  into  the 
world  ;  thus  also  salvation. 

70932.  He  who  is  delivered  from  falsities,  and  from 
the  straitness  in  which  he  then  is,  thanks  God  from  a  glad 
disposition.  .  .  The  feasts  .  .  .  are  also  said  to  have  been 
instituted  in  memory  of  the  deliverance  from  slavery  in 
Egypt,  that  is,  .  .  .  in  memory  of  the  deliverance  from 
infestation  by  falsities,  by  means  of  the  Advent  of  the 
Lord  into  the  world. 

6.  (This)  is  manifest  from  the  feast  of  the  Passover, 

which  was  to  be  celebrated  yearly  on  the  day  they  went 
out  of  Egypt,  on  account  of  the  deliverance  of  the  Sons 
of  Israel  from  slavery,  that  is,  on  account  of  the  deliver- 
ance of  those  who  are  of  the  Spiritual  Church  from 
falsities,  thus  from  damnation  ;  and  as  the  Lord  de- 
livered them  by  means  of  His  Advent,  and  elevated  them 
into  Heaven  with  Himself  when  He  rose  again  ;  this, 
too,  was  done  at  the  Passover. 

7169.  'And  delivering  Thou  hast  not  delivered  Thy 
people'  (Ex.  v. 23)  =  that  they  have  not  been  released  from 
a  state  of  infestations  by  falsities. 

7183.  They  are  now  cheered  with  hope,  and  with  a 
promise  that  they  are  certainly  to  be  delivered.  Tr. 

7186.  It  was  believed  that  they .  . .  would  be  delivered 
from  infestations  at  once  ;  when  yet  it  is  according  to 
order  that  the  evil  who  infest  should  be  removed  by 
degrees,  and  that  they  who  are  of  the  Spiritual  Church 
should  be  delivered  by  degrees.  .  .  They  are  now  in- 
structed about  this  law,  and  that  it  is  by  virtue  of  it 
that  they  will  certainly  be  delivered,  when,  according 
to  order,  the  time  and  state  are  come  .  .  .  That  Moses, 
by  whom  is  here  represented  the  Law  Divine  .  .  . 
believed  that  they  would  be  at  once  delivered  from  in- 
festations, is  evident  from  what  he  said  .  .  .  '  Delivering 


Thou  hast  not  delivered  Thy  people  ; '  by  which  is  sig- 
nified that  they  are  being  too  much  infested  by  falsities. 

3.  The  reason  why  they  who  are  of  the  Spiritual 

Church,  and  are  in  the  Lower  Earth,  are  delivered  from 
infestations  successively,  and  not  at  once,  is  that  the 
inhering  evils  and  falsities  cannot  be  otherwise  removed, 
and  goods  and  truths  insinuated  in  their  place  ;  this  is 
effected  by  means  of  many  changes  of  state. 

7277.  'Bring  forth  My  army,  My  people,  the  Sons  of 
Israel' =  that  they  are  to  be  delivered  who  are  in  goods 
and  truths.     '  To  bring  forth  '  =  to  deliver.     7282. 

7822.  It  treats  in  this  chapter  (Ex.xii.)  concerning 
the  deliverance  of  those  who  are  of  the  Spiritual  Church, 
and  the  damnation  of  those  who  are  in  faith  separated 
from  charity ;  the  damnation  of  the  latter,  and  the 
deliverance  of  the  former  is  represented  by  the  Pass- 
over ;  and  the  states  as  to  charity  and  faith  of  those  who 
have  been  delivered,  by  the  things  which  were  to  be 
observed  during  the  days  of  the  Passover. 

7823.  In  the  supreme  sense,  by  the  Passover  is  repre- 
sented the  damnation  of  the  unfaithful,  and  the  deliver- 
ance of  the  faithful  by  the  Lord,  when  He  has  been 
glorified. 

7828.  By  this  month  is  signified  the  beginning  of  the 
deliverance  of  those  who  are  of  the  Spiritual  Church 
.  .  .  detained  in  the  Lower  Earth  .  .  .  Their  first  state, 
when  delivered,  was  the  principal  of  all,  and  the  begin- 
ing  from  which  proceed  all  that  follow  .  .  .  because  they 
who  were  there  were  delivered  by  means  of  the  Advent 
of  the  Lord  into  the  world  .  .  .  and  because  they  were 
delivered  when  the  Lord  rose  again. 

7844.  'Between  the  evenings' =  the  state  of  the  de- 
liverance of  those  who  are  in  truth  from  good,  and  the 
state  of  the  damnation  of  those  who  are  in  falsity  from 
evil .  .  . 

7849.  When  (those  who  were  in  the  Lower  Earth) 
were  being  delivered,  they  were  to  be  prepared  to 
receive  the  influx  of  good  and  truth  from  the  Lord.  Sig. 
and  Ex. 

7882.  The  worship  of  the  Lord  on  account  of  deliver- 
ance from  damnation.  Sig. 

7917.  'Kill  the  Passover'  —  preparation  for  the  presence 
of  the  Lord,  and  thence  deliverance.  The  Passover  = 
the  presence  of  the  Lord,  and  the  deliverance  of  those 
who  are  of  the  Spiritual  Church. 

7933.  In  the  internal  sense,  both  in  the  books  of 
Moses,  and  in  the  Prophets,  it  treats  of  the  deliverance 
of  those  who  .  .  .  were  detained  in  the  Lower  Earth  .  .  . 
and  of  their  elevation  into  Heaven. 

7938.  'This  is  the  sacrifice  of  the  Passover  to  Jehovah' 
==  the  worship  of  the  Lord  on  account  of  deliverance. 

7942.  'He  hath  delivered  our  houses'  (Ex.xii. 27)  = 
that  nothing  damnable  reached  them,  because  they  were 
in  goods  from  the  Lord. 

7990.  'To  bring  them  forth  from  the  land  of  Egypt' 
=  deliverance  from  spiritual  captivity.  '  To  bring  forth ' 
=  to  deliver. 

8018.  'Jehovah  hath  brought  forth  the  Sons  of  Israel 
out  of  the  land  of  Egypt' =  that  the  Lord  delivered  from 
damnation  those  who  were  in  the  good  of  truth  and  the 
truth  of  good.     '  To  bring  forth '  =  to  deliver. 


Deliver 


108 


Deliver 


[A.8018]2.  Their  deliverance  by  the  Lord,  when  He  rose 
again,  is  signified  by  the  Lord's  descent  to  those  beneath  ; 
and  was  manifested  by  the  resuscitation  of  the  dead  out 
of  the  monuments  .  .  .   111. 

8038.  It  treats  in  this  chapter  (Ex.xiii.)  ...  of  the 
perpetual  remembrance,  that  by  Him  they  have  been 
delivered  from  damnation.  The  perpetual  remembrance 
of  the  deliverance  by  the  Lord  is  signified  by  the  cele- 
bration of  the  Passover. 

8050.  That  they  were  delivered  by  virtue  of  the 
Divine  power  of  the  Lord.  Sig.  .  .  'To  bring  forth '  =  to 
deliver. 

8052.  Deliverance  to  eternity.  Sig.  .  .  'To  go  forth' 
=  to  be  delivered. 

8057.  Unceasing  worship  of  the  Lord  on  account  of 
deliverance.  Sig. 

8099.  'When  they  were  delivered  (from  the  Lower 
Earth)  they  were  not  immediately  taken  up  into  Heaven. 
Sig.  and  Ex. 

8103.  The  second  state  after  they  were  delivered. 
Sig.  .  .  The  journeyings  and  encampments  of  the  Sons 
of  Israel  .  .  .  signify  the  spiritual  states  of  those  who 
have  been  delivered  by  the  Lord. 

8179.  'To  cry  to  Jehovah '  =  to  intercede,  namely,  for 
deliverance  from  temptation. 

8199.  They  who  are  delivered  from  temptations,  first 
come  into  an  obscure  state  before  they  come  into  a  clear 
one  ;  for  the  falsities  and  evils  which  are  injected  by  the 
Hells  inhere  for  some  time,  and  are  only  successively 
dissipated.  Sig. 

8261.  Glorification  of  the  Lord  by  those  who  are  of 
the  Spiritual  Church  on  account  of  deliverance.  Sig. 

8426.  In  the  end  of  the  former  state  there  shall  be  a 
revelation  that  they  have  been  delivered.  Sig. 

8528.  'In  my  bringing  you  forth  out  of  the  land  of 
Egypt' =  after  they  have  been  delivered  from  infesta- 
tions.    '  To  bring  forth '  =  to  deliver. 

8653.  'Hath  delivered  me  from  the  sword  of  Pharaoh' 
(Ex.  xviii. 4)  =  deliverance  from  the  falsity  of  those  who 
infested. 

8671.  'Jehovah  rescued  them' =  deliverance  by  the 
Lord's  Divine  aid.     'To  rescue '= deliverance.     8676. 

8866.  'Who  brought  thee  forth  out  of  the  land  of 
Egypt,  out  of  the  house  of  servants '  =  deliverance  from 
Hell  by  Him.     'To  bring  forth '  =  deliverance. 

e.  They  of  the  Spiritual  Church  .  .  .  were  de- 
livered from  Hell  by  the  Lord,  by  means  of  His  Advent 
into  the  world,  and  His  making  the  Human  in  Himself 
Divine.   Refs. 

90243.  'To  plead  the  cause '  =  to  defend  truths  against 
falsities,  and  deliver. 

.    'To  plead  the  cause  of  the  soul' =  to  defend  and 

deliver  from  falsities.     . 

9077.  '  Redemption '  =  to  give  something  else  in  its 
place,  that  there  may  be  deliverance.  .  .  For  it  here 
treats  of  deliverance  from  damnation,  and  man  can  only 
be  delivered  from  damnation  by  means  of  the  removal 
of  evil  .  .  .  The  deliverance  from  damnation,  or,  what 
is  the  same,  deliverance  from  sins,  is  the  removal  of 
evil,  which  is  effected  through  repentance  of  life.  Refs. 


9278s.  But  the  Lord  continually  protects  and  delivers. 

9286.  'Three  times  thou  shalt  keep  a  feast  to  Me  in 
the  year'  =  the  worship  of  the  Lord  and  permanent 
thanksgiving  on  account  of  deliverance  from  damnation. 
.  .  .  'Three  times'  .  .  .=  plenary  and  entire  deliverance. 

-.  The     successive    steps    of    deliverance    from 

damnation  are  circumstanced  as  are  the  successive  steps 
of  regeneration  ;  for  regeneration  is  deliverance  from 
Hell  and  introduction  into  Heaven  by  the  Lord  .  .  . 

9292.  Deliverance  from  infestation  by  falsities.  Sig. 

9294s.  The  three  feasts  were  instituted  on  account  of 
the  deliverance  of  man  from  damnation,  thus  on  account 
of  regeneration  ;  for  by  means  of  regeneration  man  is 
delivered  from  Hell  and  introduced  into  Heaven  .  .  . 

9295s.  The  second  state  of  deliverance  from  damna- 
tion, which  was  a  state  of  the  implantation  of  truth  in 
good,  was  signified  (by  this  second  feast). 

9296.  Worship  from  a  grateful  disposition  on  account 
of  the  implantation  of  good  thence,  thus  on  account  of 
regeneration  and  plenary  deliverance  from  damnation. 
(Signified  by  the  third  feast. ) 

9333s.  He  who  does  not  know  how  the  case  is  with 
the  deliverance  of  man  from  evils  and  falsities  .  .  . 

9444.  The  sins  which  a  man  does  are  inrooted  in  his 
very  life,  and  make  it ;  wherefore  no  one  is  delivered 
from  them,  unless  he  receives  new  life  from  the  Lord, 
which  is  effected  by  means  of  regeneration. 

993  74.  Deliverance  from  sins,  or  the  remission  of 
them,  is  nothing  else  than  removal ;  for  they  remain 
with  the  man  .  .  . 

1005  76.  Purification  from  the  evils  and  falsities  with 
man,  is  not  deliverance  from  them,  but  is  the  removal 
of  them.  Refs.  But  with  the  Lord  there  was  not  the 
removal,  but  the  casting  out  of  those  things  which  He 
derived  from  the  mother,  thus  plenary  deliverance  from 
them  .  .  . 

102 1 8.  Purification  or  deliverance  from  evil  through 
acknowledgment  and  faith  that  all  the  truths  and  goods 
of  faith  and  love,  and  their  ordination  and  disposition, 
are  from  the  Lord,  and  nothing  from  man.  Sig. 

102193.  As  soon  as  man  believes  that  goods  flow  in 
from  the  Lord  .  .  .  goods  affect  him  .  .  .  and  in  pro- 
portion as  goods  affect  man,  evils  are  removed,  thus  he 
is  purified  and  delivered  from  them.  (If  he  cannot  feel 
the  influx  of  goods  from  the  Lord)  still  he  ought  to 
acknowledge  and  believe  that  they  are  from  the  Lord  ; 
for  when  this  is  done,  he  is  also  delivered  from  evils, 
but,  in  order  that  he  may  be  delivered  from  evils,  this 
acknowledgment  must  be  ...  of  the  very  heart. 

10228.  'To  expiate  upon  their  souls '  =  to  be  purified 
or  delivered  from  evils  by  means  of  the  truth  of  faith  ; 
and  as  purification  or  deliverance  from  evils  is  nothing 
but  their  removal,  this,  too,  is  signified. 

10655.  'Thou  shalt  keep  the  feast  of  things  unleavened' 
=  worship  of  the  Lord  and  thanksgiving  on  account  of 
deliverance  from  evil  and  the  falsities  of  evil.  .  .  This 
feast  properly  =  the  glorification  of  the  Lord's  Human, 
thus  remembrance  and  thanksgiving  on  account  of  it ; 
for  by  means  of  it  and  of  the  subjugation  of  the  Hells 
by  the  Lord,  man  has  deliverance  from  evils,  and 
salvation.     4.   10659. 


Deliver 


109 


Delude 


P.  19.  The  temptations  ...  by  means  of  which  the 
good  can  be  delivered  from  their  evils. 


D.  220.  On  the  torment  of  the  unhappy,  and  at  last 
deliverance. 

244.  The  deliverance  of  the  bound  from  the  pit ;  it 
is  circumstanced  like  one  who  is  in  travail,  when  the 
child  comes  to  the  mouth  of  the  matrix.  Gen.  art.     261. 

404.  So  that  he  wants  to  be  delivered  and  loosed 
from  them ;  for  it  is  impossible  for  him  to  deliver 
himself. 

409.  Among  the  multitude  who  are  delivered  from 
the  pit  there  are  a  number  who  are  not  yet  devastated  .  .  . 

41 5e.  Contrive  that  the  suspicion  may  fall  upon 
another,  that  they  may  be  thus  delivered. 

41 7e.  Being  delivered  from  these  torments  .  .  . 

487.  He  was  sent  to  the  lake  .  .  .  but  was  thence 
delivered.  This  day  he  was  sent  to  a  certain  place  of 
the  damned  .  .  .  being  delivered  thence,  he  is  now 
horrified  .  .  . 

E.  32819.  By  Redemption  the  Angels  imderstand 
\ibeTa.tion-vindicationemr-from  evils,  and  deliverance 
from  falsities  in  the  following  passages.   111. 

.   ' Redemption '  =  deliverance  from  damnation. 

.  That  the  Lord  redeemed  mankind  =  that   He 

liberated  and  delivered  them  from  Hell,  and  from  the 
evils  and  falsities  which  constantly  rise  up  thence  .  .  . 
and  that  He  continually  liberates  and  delivers  them  : 
that  He  liberated  and  delivered  them  was  effected  by 
His  subjugating  the  Hells  ;  and  that  He  continually 
liberates  and  delivers,  by  His  glorifying  His  Human. 

624"*.  'To  cast  out  demons '  =  to  deliver  from  the 
falsities  of  religion. 

Deliver.      Tradere. 
See  Tradition. 

A.  2547e.  The  things  of  Heaven  are  delivered  by 
means  of  such  things  as  are  on  earth. 

3488s.  'Then  shall  they  deliver  you  into  tribulation, 
and  shall  kill  you'  (Matt.xxiv.9)  =  that  good  and  truth 
shall  perish  .  .  . 

3982s.  These  arcana  .  .  .  are  historically  delivered  .  .  . 

H.  332.  Little  children  ...  are  delivered  to  Angels 
of  the  female  sex. 

519.  They  are  delivered  to  the  Angel  guards  there. 
W.  229.  It  is  asserted  by  some  .  .  . 

T.  343.  The  things  delivered  in  this  chapter  con- 
cerning .  .  . 

463.  To  deliver  the  doctrinal  of  the  New  Church 
concerning  free-will. 

5035.  Concerning  justification,  etc.  (they  said),  "We 
give  forth  nothing  spiritual. 

512.  In  the  Reformed  Christian  world  they  tell  of  a 
a  species  of  anxiety  .  .  .  which  they  call  contrition. 

516.  Concerning  this  oral  confession,  the  Reformed 
.  .  .  thus  deliver  [themselves]. 

520.  It  has  been  delivered  by  the  Councils  .  .  . 


E.  40546.  ;He  hath  delivered  them  to  the  slaughter' 
(Is.xxxiv.2)  =  that  they  will  perish  who  are  in  these 
things.     5739. 

65510.  'To  condemn  the  Son  of  Man  and  deliver  Him 
to  the  nations' (Matt. xx.  1 9)  =  to  adjudicate  the  Divine 
truth  and  Divine  good  to  Hell,  and  to  deliver  them  to 
the  evils  and  falsities  which  are  thence. 

6S922.  'He  shall  deliver  the  wicked  to  the  sword' 
(Jer.xxv.3l)  =  that  the  unfaithful  will  perish  through 
their  own  falsities. 

8133.  The  temptations  which  the  faithful  will  undergo 
for  the  sake  of  truths,  are  described  by  'Ye  shall  be 
betrayed  by  parents,  and  brothers  .  .  .     (Lukexxi.  16). 

Delude.     Deludere. 

D.  3206.  They  most  deceitfully  delude  and  seduce  .  .  . 

J. (Post.)  I9e.  The  Dutch  cannot  be  deluded,  as 
others. 

Demand.      Reposcere.     D.2964. 
DemOCritus.     Democritus.    M.I82*. 

Demon.     Daemon. 

A.  1664.  'They  are  the  Spirits  of  demons'  (Rev.xvi. 
14)-     735I2- 

1 742s.  (Why  the  demons  wanted  to  enter  the  swine. ) 

73 1 72.  'Through  Thy  name  we  have  cast  out  demons' 
(Matt.vii.22). 

100194.  "The  demons'  (Luke  x.  i7)  =  those  who  are  in 
the  Hells. 

R.  458.  'That  they  should  not  adore  demons'  (Rev. 
ix. 20.)  =  that  thus  they  are  in  the  evils  of  their  con- 
cupiscences, and  make  one  with  their  like  in  Hell. 
'Demons' =  the  concupiscences  of  evil  which  originate 
from  the  love  of  the  world  :  the  reason  is,  that  in  Hell 
those  are  called  demons  who  are  in  these  concupiscences  ; 
and  men,  too,  who  are  in  the  same,  become  demons  after 
death.  .  .  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  'to  adore  demons '  = 
to  make  an  offering  to  these  concupiscences  from  the  love 
of  them.  .  .  It  follows,  that  he  who  does  not  search  out 
any  evil  in  himself,  and  shun  it  as  a  sin  against  God  .  .  . 
becomes  a  demon  after  death.  Nothing  but  such  con- 
cupiscences are  signified  by  'demotis-daemones,'  and 
' demons-daemonici'  in  the  following  passages.   111. 

2.  'Theforest  demons'  (Is. xiii.2i)=concupiscences 

such  as  those  of  Priapi  and  Satyrs. 

e.  The  demons  which   the  Lord  cast  out  were 

such  concupiscences  while  they  lived  in  the  world. 
Refs. 

655s.   I  replied,  Hence  demon  .  .  .     T.388. 

703.  'They  are  the  Spirits  of  demons '  =  that  they 
were  cupidities  of  falsifying  truths  and  of  reasoning 
from  falsities.  '  Demons  '  =  the  cupidities  of  falsifying 
truths. 

756.  'Has  become  the  habitation  of  demons'  (Rev. 
xviii.2)  =  that  their  Hells  are  the  Hells  of  the  concu- 
piscences of  domineering  from  the  heat  of  self-love,  and 
of  the  concupiscences  of  profaning  the  truths  of  Heaven 
from  the  spurious  zeal  of  that  love.  ' Demons  '  =  the 
concupiscences  of  evil,  and  also  the  concupiscences  of 


Demon 


110 


Demonophonia 


falsifying  truths  ;  but  demons,  like  concupiscences,  are 
of  many  kinds,  and  the  worst  are  those  who  are  con- 
cupiscences of  domineering  over  the  holy  things  of  the 
Church  and  over  Heaven  from  the  heat  of  self-love  .  .  . 

M.  43ie.  When  a  new  demon  entered  .  .  . 

432s.  Adulterers  .  .  .  there,  are  demons.  Des. 

T.  79e.  They  are  therefore  imprisoned,  and  become 
demons. 

38 1 e.  To  the  Angels  they  appear  like  those  .  .  .  who 
cry  out  to  demons,  and  kiss  them  .  .  . 

6i4e.  They  may  be  compared  to  the  demons  sent  into 
the  swine. 


D.  774.  To  the  left  there  is  a  Hell  where  there  are 
demons,  so  called,  who  act  from  mere  instinct  .  .  . 

I934e.  He  would  have  supposed  that  he  was  possessed 
by  demons. 

2278.  They  who,  in  the  Lord's  time,  were  obsessed  by 
demons,  were  not  differently  circumstanced. 

4086.  Others  in  Gehenna,  in  the  abode  of  demons  .  . . 

E.  45522.  'To  cast  out  demons'  (Mark  xvi.  i7)=to 
remove  and  reject  the  falsities  of  evil. 

586.  'That  they  should  not  adore  demons'  =  that  they 
should  not  worship  their  own  cupidities.  .  .  '  Demons  '= 
evil  cupidities  ;  because  by  'demons'  are  meant  infernal 
Spirits  ;  and  all  Spirits  who  are  in  the  Hells  are  nothing 
but  evil  cupidities. 

-.  What  is  meant  by  worshipping  demons.  Ex. 

s.  This  worship  is  also  meant  by  'sacrificing  to 

demons'  in  Deut.xxxii.17  ;  Lev.xvii.7. 

4.    'To  sacrifice  sons  and  daughters  to  demons' 

(Ps.cvi.37)  =  to  destroy  the  truths  and  goods  of  the 
Church  through  evil  cupidities. 

■ s.  These  corporeal  and  merely  natural  concupis- 
cences are  signified  by  .  .  .  'the  forest  demon,'  or  'satyr' 
(Is.xxxiv.  14). 

6.   'Forest    demons'    or    'satyrs'    (Is.  xiii.  21)  = 

merely  corporeal  cupidities. 

e.    'The  demons'  cast  out  by  the  Lord,  by  which 

many  were  then  obsessed,  =  falsities  of  every  kind  with 
which  the  Church  was  infested,  and  from  which  she  was 
delivered  by  the  Lord.  Refs. 

624*.  'To  cast  out  demons'  (Matt.vii.22)  =  to  deliver 
from  the  falsities  of  religion  ;  '  demons '  =  the  falsities  of 
religion. 

659s.  Hence  it  is  evident  whence  it  was  that  'those 
who  were  obsessed  by  demons  were  in  the  sepulchres' 
(Matt.viii.  Mark  v.  Lukeviii.)  namely,  that  those  who 
obsessed  them,  while  they  had  lived  in  the  world,  were 
in  falsities  from  evil ;  that  is,  in  Knowledges  from  the 
Word,  which  they  made  dead  by  applying  them  to 
confirm  evils,  and  also  to  destroy  the  genuine  truths  of 
the  Church,  especially  the  truths  concerning  the  Lord, 
the  Word,  and  the  life  after  death,  which  dead  Know- 
ledges are  called  'traditions.'  Hence  it  was,  that  they 
who  were  obsessed  by  such  who  had  become  demons 
were  in  the  sepulchres,  and  the  demons  themselves  were 
afterwards  cast  out  into  the  swine,  which  precipitated 
themselves  into  the  sea.  The  reason  they  were  cast  into 
the  swine,  was  that  while  they  lived  in  the  world  they 


had  been  in  sordid  avarice  .  .  .  The  reason  they  precipi- 
tated themselves  into  the  sea,  was  that  'the  sea'  there 
=  Hell. 

70614.  'In  My  name  they  shall  cast  out  demons' 
(Mark  xvi.)  .  .  .  ' Demons '  =  falsities  of  every  kind, 
which  are  thus  cast  out,  that  is,  removed,  by  the  Lord 
through  doctrine  from  the  Word. 

74010.  The  Pharisees  said  of  Jesus,  that  'He  cast  out 
demons  by  Beelzebub  the  prince  of  the  demons.'  Jesus 
said  to  them  ...  'If  I  in  the  Spirit  of  God  cast  out 
demons,  surely  the  Kingdom  of  God  hath  come  to  you' 
(Matt.xii.  24,28). 

16.   In  these  passages  in  the  Old  Testament,  only 

'Satan'  is  mentioned,  and  not  'the  devil;'  but  instead 
of  him  there  is  said  'the  enemy,'  'the  hater,'  'the 
adversary,'  'the  accuser,'  'demon,'  also  'death,'  and 
'Hell.' 

8155.  'The  Canaanitish  woman,  whose  daughter  was 
agitated  by  a  demon.  .  .  '  (Matt.  xv.  22). 

1001.  'They  are  the  Spirits  of  demons'  (Rev.xvi.)  = 
false  reasonings  from  Hell.  .  .  '  Demons  '  =  those  things 
which  are  from  Hell ;  for  in  the  Word  those  are  called 
'demons'  who  are  in  the  cupidity  of  falsifying  truths, 
which  is  especially  done  by  means  of  reasonings.  Hence, 
in  the  abstract  sense,  'demons-cZaewiones'  and  'demons- 
daemonia  '  =  cupidities  and  falsities.  111.     10033. 

109S.  '  (Babylon)  has  become  the  habitation  of  demons ' 

I  =  where  there  are  direful  falsities  from  the  truths  and 
goods  of  the  Church  profaned.  .  .  ' Demons '  =  those  who 

I  are  in  direful  falsities  from  truths  and  goods  profaned. 
Ex. 

Demonophonia.     Daemonophonia.  Coro.  45. 

Demonstrate.     Demonstrare. 
Demonstration.     Demonstratio. 

A.  I46e.  However  plainly  they  may  be  demonstrated. 

601 53.  If  it  were  demonstrated  they  would  not  believe. 

W.  208.  As   has  been   demonstrated  above.      2092. 

225e.  230.  231.  242.  .  282.  304.    359.   P.54.   210. 

T-372. 

222.  It  is  not  allowable  to  demonstrate  this  matter, 
except  by  means  of  universals. 

242s.   Here,  it  is  to  be  demonstrated.     260. 

298.  This  will  be  fully  demonstrated  in  what  follows. 
P.2i8,etc.  T.3292.  336.  395.  e.  603. 

31  ie.  Time  fails  to  demonstrate  these  things  more  at 
large. 

41 24.  To  demonstrate  or  confirm  anything  by  means 
of  things  unknown  places  a  subject  in  obscurity. 

R.  ie.  These  things  are  to  be  demonstrated  by  like 
things  elsewhere  in  the  Word.     285. 

D.  1662.  That  envy  and  pain  thence  arising .  .  . 
might  be  effectively  demonstrated. 

350.  That  each  and  all  things  may,  in  Heaven,  be 
demonstrated  to  the  light. 

426e.  This  can  demonstrate  nothing,  except  that  such 
a  man  cannot  enter  the  other  life  .  .  . 

1291.   Faith  without  sight  .  .  .  spurns  and  rejects  all 


Demosthenes 


111 


Denude 


demonstration  ;  just  as  one  who  sees  an  object  refuses 
to  have  it  demonstrated  to  him  that  he  sees  it  .  .  .  For 
an  object  that  is  demonstrated  to  be  seen  which  is 
already  seen  is  called  into  doubt,  for  such  demonstra- 
tion is  attended  with  this.  Therefore  demonstrations 
are  only  for  those  who  want  to  believe  nothing  unless 
they  see  it.  Lest  such  should  remain  in  their  blindness, 
and  be  further  blinded,  things  are  to  be  demonstrated 
which  ought  not  to  be  demonstrated  ;  as,  for  example, 
that  there  is  a  God,  which  everyone  ought  to  believe 
without  demonstrating  arguments  ;  whereas  it  is  usually 
the  case  that  when  this  is  demonstrated,  in  every 
argument  there  is  contained  something  of  doubt. 

I7i8e.  Nor  can  this  phantasy  be  taken  away  from 
them,  except  by  means  of  living  demonstrations. 

1 7 19.  A  thousand  proofs  of  experience  have  demon- 
strated this  to  me  to  the  very  sense. 

Demosthenes.     Demosthenes.   M.182.   T.693. 

Demur.     See  Prescribe. 

Den.     Bestiarinm.    T.57.  296s.  511.  798s. 

Den.      Cavea.    T.604.  611. 

Den.     Lustrum.    H.586.    Coro.282. 

Den.    Specus.    D.4910.  E.5269. 

Denial.     Infitiae.    Coro.40. 

Denmark.     Danemarkia,  Dania. 
Dane.    Danus. 

J.  48.  (At  the  Last  Judgment  the  Danes  were  stationed 
in  the  west. ) 

C.  J.  20.  In  the  World  of  Spirits  .  .  .  the  Danes  are 
in  the  west.     D.5395. 

Life  4.  This  is  evident  from  the  prayer  which  is  read 
before  the  people  in  .  .  .  Denmark,  etc. 

R.  484.  All  the  books  treated  of  justifying  faith  ; 
profoundly,  those  from  Sweden  and  Denmark  ;  more 
profoundly,  those  from  Germany  ;  still  more  profoundly, 
those  from  Britain ;  and  most  profoundly,  those  from 
Holland.     T.161. 

M.  in.  (Opinions  of  the  Danes  concerning  the  origin 
of  marriage  love  and  its  potency. ) 

D.  5396.  (The  visitation  of  the  Danes,  etc.) 

5791J.  (Character  of  those  in  Denmark.) 

Inv.  24.  The  Lord  .  .  .  stirred  up  Denmark,  etc.  to 
receive  (the  Word  at  the  time  of  the  Reformation). 

Denounce.     De?iuntiare. 
Denunciation.    Denuntiatio. 

A.  78ioe.  The  denunciation  of  death. 

8542.  After  they  have  denounced  death  to  them. 
10382.      D.622e. 

E.  884.  Exhortation  and  denunciation.  Sig. 

Density.     Densitas. 
Dense.     Densus. 

A.  10442.  All  the  density  of  its  cloud  is  thence. 


i86oe.  The  dense  falsity  from  which  is  evil,  and  the 
dense  evil  from  which  is  falsity. 

1 86 1.  The  densest  falsity.  Sig. 

4865e.  In  dense  thick  darkness. 

6612.  This  may  be  evident  from  the  density  of  the 
sphere  in  which  sensuous  Spirits  are,  and  from  the 
purity  of  the  sphere  in  which  are  the  Angels  of  Heaven. 

7712.  The  density  of  falsity  from  evil.  Sig. 

8369.  'The  branch  of  a  thick  tree'  (Lev.xxiii.40)  = 
scientific  truth.     9296s. 

8443e.  The  speech  of  the  Angels  of  the  lower  Heaven 
appears  as  a  bright  cloud  ...  in  density  and  tenuity 
according  to  the  quality  of  the  truths. 

8781.  'Lo,  I  come  to  thee  in  the  density  of  a  cloud' 
(Ex.xix.9)  =  that  it  shall  take  place  in  a  form  in  the 
highest  degree  natural.  .  .  'Density' = what  is  obscure 
.  .  .  What  is  Divine  can  only  appear  to  such  ...  as  the 
density  of  a  cloud.     8814. 

88 142.  The  Lord  must  appear  to  such  in  a  dense 
and  heavy  cloud.  In  the  other  life  they  are  circumfused 
with  a  dense  and  black  cloud,  according  to  the  quality 
and  quantity  of  the  falsities. 

H.  557  (g).  The  proprium  of  man  ...  is  nothing  but 
dense  evil.  Refs. 


D.  4202.  How  great  is  the  density  of  the  sphere  .  .  . 

E.  53714.  'Through  a  land  of  .  .  .  dense  shadow' 
(Jer.ii.6)=a  state  of  falsity. 

Denude.     Demi  dare. 
Denudation.    Denudatio. 

See  also  under  Naked. 

A.  4015.  ' The  making  bare  of  the  white  which  was 
upon  the  rods'  (Gen.xxx.37)  =  the  disposition  of  the 
power  of  interior  truth. 

6432s.  '  To  be  made  bare '  (Is. xxxii.  1 1 )  =  to  be  deprived 
of  truth. 

T.  4 12.  Whence  (the  stripping  and  making  bald  of 
the  trees  in  winter). 

E.  2404.   'Thou  wast  naked  and  bare'  (Ezek.xvi.7). 

3S77-  'With  denuding  Thy  bow  shall  be  denuded' 
(Hab.iii.9)  =  that  the  doctrine  of  truth  will  be  opened. 

403s.  Stripping  He  hath  stripped  it,  and  cast  it  forth ' 
(Joel  i.  7)  =  that  there  is  no  longer  any  good  and  truth 
which  is  not  destroyed  ;  'to  strip,'  namely,  of  fruits  and 
leaves  =  of  goods  and  truths;  and  'to  cast  out'  =  to 
utterly  destroy. 

65056.  'He  shall  make  bare  its  cedar'  (Zeph.ii.i4)= 
the  Rational  destroyed. 

11534.  'Make  thyself  bare' (Is. xlvii. 2)  =  to  adulterate 
the  goods  of  the  Word. 

Deny.     Abnegare. 

A.  45995.  That  they  cannot  at  all  overcome  from 
themselves  and  from  what  is  their  own,  but  from  the 
Lord,  is  signified  by  'he  who  does  not  deny  all  his 
faculties  (or  'all  that  he  hath'),  cannot  be  my  disciple' 
(Lukexiv.33). 


Deny 


112 


Deny 


[A.]  60005.  That  Peter  in  that  night  denied  the  Lord 
three  times,  represented  also  the  last  time  of  the  Church, 
when  the  truth  of  faith  is  indeed  taught,  but  is  not 
believed  ;  -which  time  is  'night,'  because  then  the  Lord 
is  utterly  denied  in  the  hearts  of  men.     6o73e.   10134s. 

92074.  'Who  does  not  deny  all  his  faculties,'  that  is, 
who  does  not  love  the  Lord  above  all  things. 

1022718.  'To  deny  all  the  faculties'  =  to  attribute 
nothing  of  intelligence  and  wisdom  to  self.     E.  236s. 

103003.  'To  deny  all  his  faculties' =  to  love  the  Lord 
above  all  things  ;  'faculties'  are  those  things  which  are 
proper  to  man. 

E.  1224.  'To  deny  himself '  (Matt.xvi.24  ;  Markviii. 
34)= to  reject  the  evils  which  are  from  proprium. 

864s.  'To  deny  himself  =  not  to  be  led  by  himself, 
but  by  the  Lord  ;  and  he  denies  himself  who  shuns  and 
is  averse  to  evils  because  they  are  sins  .  .  . 

Deny.     Negare. 
Denial.    Negatio. 
Negative.    Negativus. 

A.  1963.  All  who  reason  from  sensuous,  scientific,  and 
philosophical  things,  deny  that  there  is  spirit  .  .  . 

2333.  They  who  consult  sensuous  and  scientific  things 
concerning  matters  of  belief,  precipitate  themselves  not 
only  into  doubt,  but  also  into  denial,  that  is,  into  thick 
darkness,  (and  thus)  into  all  cupidities  .  .  . 

301.  Because  (they  reason)  from  self.  .  .  they  cannot 
do  otherwise  than  deny,  and  when  they  deny,  they  also 
blaspheme  and  profane. 

io72e.  They  who  care  nothing  for  the  Word  .  .  .  thus 
denying  principles,  are  called  '  drunkards  without  wine. ' 

1886.  Pref.  Still,  at  heart  they  deny  (the  resurrection.) 

3.  The  Sadducees  openly  denied  the  resurrection  ; 

but  did  better  than  those  at  this  day  who  say  that  they 
do  not  deny  .  .  .  and  yet  deny  at  heart. 

2049A  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  the  truths  of  faith 
can  never  be  acknowledged  as  truths  .  .  .  unless  they 
are  implanted  in  charity  ;  for  interiorly  they  are  denied 
at  heart. 

2215.  ' Sarah  denied .  ..' (Gen. xviii.  15)  =  that  human 
rational  truth  wanted  to  excuse  itself. 

2338.  See  Affirm  at  these  refs.  25684.  2689s.  3221. 
3913-  39234-  4°966.  44S92-  46384.  476o.  H.356.  D.3614. 
4536.  D.  Min.4580. 

2352.  The  denial  of  the  Divine  Human  and  of  the 
Holy  proceeding  of  the  Lord.  Sig. 

2354s.  This  all  they  deny  at  heart  who  are  in  the  life 
of  evil .  .  .  Better  did  the  Pharisees,  who  openly  denied 
the  Divine  of  the  Lord  .  .  . 

2357.  Lest  they  should  .  .  .  deny  the  Divine  Human 
and  the  Holy  proceeding  of  the  Lord.   Sig. 

23732.  The  reason  they  who  are  in  evil  within  the 
Church  reject  charity  more  than  they  deny  the  Lord, 
is  .  .  . 

23803.  Such  within  the  Church  deny  the  Lord  in  secret. 

256s3.  When  the  doctrine  of  faith  is  regarded  from 
rational  things  ...  it  not  only  becomes  none,  but  what- 
ever is  therein  is  denied. 


4.  The   principle   which    leads   to   all   folly   and 

insanity  is  to  deny  all  things  .  .  .  until  one  is  convinced 
by  those  things  which  he  can  apprehend  or  feel  .  .  .  this 
is  to  be  called  the  negative  principle  .  .  .  They  who 
think  from  the  negative  principle  ...  at  last  deny 
all  things. 

6.  There  are  some  in  doubt  before  they  deny,  and 

some  before  they  affirm  ;  they  who  are  in  doubt  before 
they  deny,  are  they  who  incline  to  a  life  of  evil ;  and 
when  this  life  carries  them  away,  the  more  they  think 
about  these  things  the  more  they  deny  them. 

3420.  That  they  who  are  in  the  mere  knowledge  of 
Knowledges  would  deny  these  things.  Sig.  'To  stop  up' 
=  not  to  want  to  know,  and,  what  is  the  same,  to  deny  ; 
thus  to  obliterate. 

e.  He,  therefore,  who  teaches  what  is  to  be  done, 

and  does  not  do  it,  does  not  want  to  know  truths ;  for 
they  are  against  his  life,  and  the  things  which  are  against 
his  life  he  denies. 

3427.  Denial  on  account  of  these  things.  Sig.  .  .  'To 
quarrel,  or  contend '  =  to  deny.  .  .  'Ezek' or 'contention' 
=  the  denial  of  the  internal  sense  of  the  Word  ;  the 
causes  of  the  denial  are  also  in  the  same  word. 

2.  They  who  are  in  the  mere  knowledge  of  Know- 
ledges .  .  .  cannot  do  otherwise  than  deny  that  there  is 
an  internal  sense  of  the  Word.   Ex. 

3429.  'Sitnah'  =  opposition,  which  is  a  further  degree 
of  denial. 

3452.  That  their  doctrinal  things  of  faith  regarded  in 
themselves  should  not  be  denied,  namely,  so  far  as  they 
are  from  the  literal  sense  of  the  Word.  Sig.  and  Ex. 

3472°.  The  Christian  world  denies  at  heart  that  the 
Word  is  so  Divine. 

3488s.   'They  shall  kill  you,'  that  is,  by  denial. 

39 1 35.  This  good  cannot  inflow  into  what  is  nega- 
tive .  .  . 

3923s.  That  they  were  in  the  Negative  of  all  the  things 
which  are  of  faith  and  its  doctrine.  Sig. 

403 13.  He  first  acknowledges  and  believes  .  .  .  and 
then  denies  .  .  .  They  who  once  acknowledge  at  heart, 
and  afterwards  deny,  are  they  who  profane. 

41  io2.  Evil  Spirits  .  .  .  are  adjoined  in  order  to  induce 
the  negative  things  which  are  to  be  dispelled,  so  that 
the  man  may  be  the  better  confirmed  in  truths  and  goods. 

4197.  Christians  who  have  not  lived  in  charity,  have 
closed  Heaven  against  themselves,  very  many  so  that  it 
cannot  be  opened  ;  for  they  know  truths  and  deny 
them  .  .  . 

42 144.  They  who  deny  or  despise  the  Lord  (are  in 
fatuous  lumen). 

43026.  That  on  account  of  the  disagreement  of  the 
natural  man,  it  is  better  to  be  in  simple  good,  although 
in  the  denial  of  truth,  is  signified  by  'to  enter  halt 
into  life.' 

4321.  Although  these  things  appear  incredible,  still 
they  are  not  to  be  denied,  because  experience  itself 
dictates  them.  If  all  things  of  which  the  causes  are  not 
known  were  to  be  denied,  innumerable  things  which 
come  forth  in  nature  would  be  denied,  the  causes  of 
which  are  known  scarcely  as  to  the  one  ten  thousandth 


Deny 


113 


Deny- 


part  .  .  .  How  much  more  is  this  the  case  with  the 
arcana  which  come  forth  in  the  sphere  above  nature  ! 
Examp. 

44934.  That  there  is  any  internal  sense  ...  he  denies. 

45037.  Fallacies  from  sensuous  things,  by  means  of 
which  the  truths  of  the  Church  cannot  be  seen  ;  con- 
cerning which,  therefore,  they  are  in  negative  doubt.  Sig. 

4622.  He  does  indeed  wish  to  know  how  the  case  is 
with  Heaven,  etc.,  but  when  he  is  told,  he  yet  believes 
nothing,  because  at  heart  he  denies  their  existence  .  .  . 

4689s.  Many  of  those  who  come  from  the  Christian 
world,  who  also  have  preached  the  Lord  in  the  world, 
there  utterly  deny  Him  .  .  . 

473 12.  This  supreme  or  inmost  truth,  that  the  Human 
of  the  Lord  is  Divine,  is  denied  by  those  in  the  Church 
who  are  in  faith  alone. 

47602.  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  those  who  are  in  the 
Negative,  if  they  consult  scientifics,  cast  themselves 
more  into  falsities  .  .  . 

4.  The  learned   consult  scientifics  .  .  .  from   the 

Negative,  and  thereby  destroy  in  themselves  all  insight 
from  above  or  within  .  .  . 

Heaven  is    never  denied  to   anyone  by  the 


If  he  then  denies  them,  it  is  a  sign  that  he  is 


5057"- 
Lord  .  . 

5I352- 
in  evil  .  .  • 

5 1 59s.  The  things  which  are  higher  or  more  interior, 
he  at  heart  denies. 

5164s.  There  are  very  many  within  the  Church  who 
deny  the  Lord,  and  say  that  they  acknowledge  a 
Supreme  Being. 

5179.  Because  they  deny  all  that  which  is  called 
spiritual  .  .  .  There  thence  come  forth  many  things 
which  the  man  who  attributes  all  things  to  nature  either 
denies,  or  ascribes  to  a  more  occult  nature. 

57002.  Thus  it  happens  that  when  they  have  inverted 
heavenly  order  in  this  way,  they  at  last  deny  Divine 
things,  those  which  are  of  Heaven,  and  consequently 
those  which  are  of  charity  and  faith  .  .  . 

60 1 53.  If  it  were  demonstrated,  they  would  not  believe, 
because  the  Negative  universally  reigns. 

6383.  They  who  do  not  believe  unless  scientific  and 
sensuous  things  dictate,  and  who  are  in  the  Negative  to 
begin  with,  never  believe ;  the  reason  is,  that  the 
Negative  universally  reigns,  and  when  this  universally 
reigns,  the  scientifics  which  deny  flow  in  and  are  gathered 
together,  but  those  which  confirm  .  .  .  are  rejected  to 
the  sides,  or  are  explained  in  favour  of  the  denying 
scientifics,  and  thus  the  Negative  is  strengthened. 

6479.  With  those  who  are  in  the  Negative,  that  is, 
those  with  whom  the  Negative  universally  reigns,  doubts 
can  never  be  removed,  for  with  them  one  scruple  avails 
more  than  a  thousand  confirmations. 

e.  But  these  Spirits  attended  but  little  to  these 

things,  because  they  were  in  the  Negative. 

6729e.  See  Daughter  at  this  ref. 

6959s.  See  Pkofane  at  these  refs.     6963s. 

72902.  If  the  internal  man   afterwards   denies  that 

VOL.  II. 


which  miracles  have  confirmed,  there  takes  place  an 
opposition  and  collision  of  the  internal  and  external 
man  .  .  .  thus  profanation. 

4.  Miracles  would  effect  still  less  at  this  day  .  .  . 

when  everything  (spiritual)  is  denied  ;  for  there  uni- 
versally reigns  a  Negative  against  the  Divine  influx 
and  government  .  .  . 

7351.  Hence  it  is,  that  after  a  man  has  falsified  truths, 
he  at  last  utterly  denies  them  .  .  . 

7492.  With  those  in  whom  they  are  extinguished,  the 
good  which  is  of  love  and  the  truth  which  is  of  faith  are 
denied,  and  the  evils  and  falsities  which  are  contrary 
are  affirmed. 

8567.  See  Temptation  at  this  ref. 

8868.  The  Lord  is  not  in  the  truths  with  man,  when 
he  denies  Him  and  His  Divine. 

8971.  Living  experience  from  those  in  the  other  life, 
who  in  their  heart  have  denied  that  the  Word  is  inspired 
from  the  Divine  ...  It  was  observed  that  they  had  lived 
at  their  pleasure,  and  that  therefore  in  their  hearts  they 
had  denied  the  Divine,  Heaven  and  Hell,  the  life  after 
death,  and  all  other  matters  of  faith. 

902 1 .  Denial  in  every  way  of  the  Lord  and  His  King- 
dom by  those  who  are  of  the  Church,  and  thus  the 
profanation  of  the  good  and  truth  of  the  Church.  Sig. 
.  .  .  'To  curse '  —  aversion  and  disjunction,  thus  also 
denial  in  every  way  ;  for  he  who  averts  and  disjoins 
himself  from  the  Lord,  denies  Him  at  heart. 

e.   Hence  it  is,  that  the  denial  of  the  Lord  is  not 

profanation  with  those  who  are  outside  the  Church. 

9033.  It  is  here  said  of  God  that  '  He  is  to  be  feared, 
because  He  is  able  to  destroy  soul  and  body  in  Gehenna,' 
when  yet  He  destroys  no  one  ;  but  still  it  is  true  ; 
wherefore,  it  is  not  to  be  extinguished,  that  is,  denied  ; 
for  if  it  is  denied,  faith  in  the  Word  perishes  .  .  . 

e.  This  is  attributed  to  the  Lord  in  the  sense  of 

the  letter,  because  it  so  appears  ;  therefore,  as  it  is  an 
apparent  truth,  it  is  not  to  be  denied,  that  is,  ex- 
tinguished ;  for  thus  faith  for  the  Word  would  be 
extinguished,  which  faith  is  with  the  simple.  Kefs. 

9222.  Truth  Divine  is  the  Word  and  is  doctrine  from 
the  Word  ;  they  who  deny  these  at  heart,  blaspheme, 
even  if  they  praise  and  preach  it ;  blasphemy  lies  con- 
cealed in  the  denial  .  .  . 

2.  They  who  blaspheme  or  deny  the  Word,  cannot 

receive  anything  of  the  truth  and  good  of  faith  .  .  . 
Wherefore,  they  who  deny  the  Word  cannot  receive 
anything  that  the  Word  teaches  ;  for  when  they  read 
or  hear  it,  there  occurs  what  is  negative,  which  either 
extinguishes  the  truth  or  turns  it  into  falsity. 

9264.  When  the  Divine  truth  and  good  which  is  from 
the  Lord  is  denied,  it  is  extinguished  with  the  man, 
thus  so  is  the  Lord  Himself .  .  .  This  truth  and  good  is 
extinguished,  when  the  Divine  of  the  Lord  is  denied, 
and  also  when  the  Word  is  ;  for  this  is  Divine  truth 
from  the  Lord  and  concerning  the  Lord  ;  to  deny  this, 
when  it  has  been  first  acknowledged  and  received  in 
faith,  and  thus  to  extinguish  it,  is  'the  sin  against  the 
Holy  Spirit,'  which  is  not  remitted. 

9324e.  When  the  truths  of  faith  and  the  goods  of  love 
are  denied  at  heart,  the  man  spiritually  dies. 

H 


Deny 


114 


Deny 


[A.]  93254.  'What  is  abortive  and  barren '  =  vastations 
and  denials  of  good  and  truth. 

97557.  'Its  waves'  =  ratiocinations  therefrom,  and 
thence  denials. 

98 1S27.  'To  speak  against'  Divine  truth,  or  to  deny 
it,  when  once  it  has  been  acknowledged,  is  profanation. 

100338.  Let  everyone  within  the  Church  therefore 
beware  lest  he  deny  the  Lord,  and  also  lest  he  deny  His 
Divine  ;  for  to  this  denial  Heaven  is  closed  and  Hell  is 
open  .  .  . 

101122.  Hence  may  be  evident,  what  is  the  nature  of 
the  lot  in  the  other  life  of  those  who  are  born  within  the 
Church,  and  still  at  heart  deny  the  Lord,  whatever  may 
be  their  character  in  moral  life  ;  by  much  experience  it 
has  been  given  to  know,  that  they  cannot  be  saved.  Sig. 
1013413.  The  triple  denial  (of  the  Lord  by  Peter)  = 
the  plenary  denial  of  the  Lord  at  the  end  of  the  Church. 

.  These  words  to  Peter  signified  the  denial  of  the 

Lord  in  the  Church,  when  its  end  comes  :  for  the  Lord 
is  denied  when  there  is  no  longer  any  faith,  and  faith  is 
not  where  there  is  no  longer  any  charity. 

101562.  Hence  it  is,  that  the  merely  natural  man  .  .  . 
at  heart  denies  Divine  and  heavenly  things  .  .  . 

10175.  Hence  it  is,  that  those  who  have  taken  delight 
in  adulteries,  afterwards  hold  cheap  and  also  at  heart 
deny  those  things  which  are  of  the  Church  and  Heaven. 
10287.  He  who  denies  the  Lord  is  in  evils  and 
falsities  ;  for  good  and  truth  come  from  no  other  Source 
than  He. 

103 19.  That  the  evils  of  the  love  of  self  and  the  world 
induce  such  ignorance  ...  is  very  manifest  from  those 
within  the  Church,  who,  although  they  know  from 
revelation  that  there  is  a  God,  etc.,  still  fall  into  denial 
concerning  these  things  ;  as  well  the  learned  as  the 
unlearned. 

104122.  They  who  are  in  externals  without  an  internal 
...  in  their  heart  deny  the  Divine. 

104924.  "With  those  who  deny  (the  truths  of  faith  from 
the  Word),  the  internal  is  entirely  closed  .  .  . 

1073 ie.  Such  are  they  who  deny  these  universals  (of 
the  Church). 

10744.  As  (those  with  whom  the  love  of  self  and  the 
love  of  the  world  make  the  life)  receive  nothing  from 
Heaven,  in  their  heart  they  deny  God  and  the  life  after 
death  .  .  . 

H.  354.  They  who  at  heart  have  denied  the  Divine, 
however  they  may  have  confessed  it  with  the  mouth, 
become  so  stupid,  that  they  can  scarcely  comprehend 
any  civil  truth,  still  less  any  spiritual  one  .  .  .  The  in- 
teriors of  their  minds  are  so  closed  up  that  they  appear 
black  .  .  . 

45  2e.  For  the  most  part  they  are  tied  to  some  infernal 
Society,  because  such  have  also  denied  the  Divine  .  .  . 

5062.  Quite  contrary  is  the  state  of  those  who  in  the 
world  have  lived  in  evil,  and  who  have  no  conscience, 
and  thence  have  denied  the  Divine  ;  for  all  who  live  in 
evil,  interiorly  in  themselves  deny  the  Divine  .  .  . 

5322.  Hence  it  is  that  as  with  those  who  love  them- 
selves and  the  world  above  all  things  the  higher  things 


of  the   mind   are   closed,    at   heart  they  deny   Divine 
truths  .  .  . 

575.  In  these  Hells  are  all  those  who  have  acknow- 
ledged nature  and  have  denied  the  Divine  .  .  . 

W.  I3e.  The  denial  of  God  makes  Hell ;  and,  in 
Christendom,  the  denial  of  the  Lord's  Divinity. 

P.  182.  If  man  manifestly  saw  the  Divine  Providence, 
he  would  either  deny  God,  or  make  himself  God.  Gen. 
art.     183,  Ex. 

i85e.  As  they  then  manifestly  see  the  Divine  Provi- 
dence .  .  .  which  is  that  they  are  to  come  into  Hell,  they 
not  only  deny  God,  but  also  blaspheme  Him. 

i89e.  When  such  are  elevated  into  Heaven  .  .  .  they 
do  not  see  anything ;  as  I  have  seen  done  with  many 
who  have  denied  the  Divine  Providence  of  the  Lord. 

227s.  But  this  cannot  be  done,  if  a  man  first  acknow- 
ledges the  truths  of  faith,  and  lives  according  to  them, 
and  afterwards  recedes  from  and  denies  them.  Ex. 

228.  He  who  does  not  know  holy  things,  cannot  ac- 
knowledge them,  and  afterwards  deny  them.  .  .  It  would 
be  otherwise  if  (the  Jews)  were  to  receive  and  acknow- 
ledge it,  and  afterwards  were  to  deny  it,  which,  how- 
ever, is  rarely  done  ;  many  of  them  acknowledge  it 
exteriorly,  and  deny  it  interiorly,  and  are  like  hypocrites. 
But  those  profane  holy  things  by  a  commingling  of  them 
with  profane  ones,  who  first  receive  and  acknowledge, 
and  afterwards  depart  and  deny. 

2.   If  as  a  man  grows  up  he  acknowledges  truths 

and  lives  according  to  them,  and  afterwards  denies  them, 
he  commingles  holy  with  profane  things. 

23 16.  The  sixth  kind  of  profanation  is  from  those  who 
acknowledge  the  Word,  yet  deny  the  Divine  of  the 
Lord.  Ex. 

7.  The  seventh  kind  of  profanation  is  from  those 

who  first  acknowledge  Divine  truths,  and  live  according 
to  them,  and  afterwards  recede  from  and  deny  them. 
This  is  the  worst  kind  of  profanation.  Ex. 

236e.  Wherefore,  he  can  use  these  things  as  arguments 
to  deny  (the  Divine  Providence). 

326.  The  acknowledgment  of  God  makes  the  conjunc- 
tion of  God  with  man  and  of  man  with  God,  and  the 
denial  of  God  makes  the  separation.  Gen.  art. 

5.  They  who  deny  God  in  the  world,  deny  Him 

after  death. 

R.  180.  'Thou  hast  not  denied  My  name'  (Rev.iii.8) 
=  that  they  are  in  the  worship  of  the  Lord. 

202.  'Thou  art  neither  cold  nor  hot '  =  that  those  who 
are  such  now  deny  that  the  Word  is  Divine  and  holy, 
and  now  acknowledge  that  it  is  so. 

.   Such  are  the  same  in  relation  to  God,  now  they 

deny  and  now  they  acknowledge  Him  ;  in  like  manner 
in  relation  to  all  things  of  the  Church. 

476.  At  this  day  that  there  is  one  God  is  not  denied, 
but  that  the  Lord  is  He,  is  denied.  That  the  Church 
is  from  Him  who  is  the  Saviour  and  Redeemer  is  not 
denied  ;  but  that  He  is  to  be  immediately  approached 
as  the  Saviour  and  Redeemer,  is  denied  .  .  . 

872.  These  cannot  do  otherwise  than  interiorly  in 
themselves  deny  God  ;  for  this  lies  stored  up  in  a  life  of 
evil  confirmed  by  falsities. 


Deny 


115 


Depart 


T.  144.  Then,  on  account  of  his  denial  of  God,  he  is 
damned. 

e.  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  he  who  denies  God  is 

already  among  the  damned,  and,  after  death,  he  is 
gathered  to  his  own. 

1473.  The  minds  of  all  men  who  deny  the  holiness  of 
the  Word  and  the  Divinity  of  the  Lord,  think  in  the 
lowest  region  (of  the  mind). 

382.  All  they  are  evil  who  deny  the  creation  of  the 
world  by  God,  and  thus  deny  God  ;  for  they  are  natural- 
istic atheists  .  .  .  Wherefore,  they  who  deny  God  do  not 
will  and  therefore  are  not  able  to  receive  any  good  from 
any  source  than  their  own  proprium  .  .  . 

D.  2088.  There  were  some  Spirits  who  denied ;  but 
it  was  perceived  by  others,  that  they  said  this  from 
malignity  .  .  .  which  they  also  confessed,  saying,  that 
they  wanted  to  be  potent  with  the  licence  of  saying  and 
denying. 

2651.  As  this  is  the  truth,  there  should  be  no  ratio- 
cination about  the  truth  of  the  thing  from  causes  ;  and 
if  no  causes  are  found,  the  truth  is  not  to  be  invalidated 
or  denied,  as  is  usually  the  case  ;  but  being  the  truth 
it  ought  to  be  believed  ;  if  they  want  to  investigate  the 
causes,  they  may  do  so  .  .  .  provided  that  if  they  do  not 
find  the  cause  .  .  .  the  truth  be  not  therefore  denied ; 
it  is  as  with  almost  all  things  in  nature  ...  if  all  things 
were  denied  because  the  causes  are  not  found,  there 
would  be  no  natural  truth. 

2663e.  In  the  ideas  (of  the  simple  at  heart),  there  is 
no  such  doubt  and  Negative,  as  there  is  in  the  ideas  of 
those  who  suppose  that  they  are  wise  from  themselves. 

3105.  It  has  sometimes  happened,  that  they  who  in 
life  have  preached  heavenly  truths  .  .  .  denied  them 
when  they  were  demonstrated  in  the  other  life,  because 
they  had  been  in  a  state  of  ratiocination  concerning 
them.  Examp. 

3493.  That  by  means  of  disputations  the  Knowledges 
of  faith  may  be  brought  to  denial. 

.  Those  things  which  in  themselves  are  manifest, 

and  are  in  light,  if  they  come  into  discussion,  come  into 
obscurity  or  ignorance,  and  from  ignorance  or  obscurity 
into  doubt,  and  from  doubt  into  denial. 

.  Those  with  whom  the   Lord  has  rooted  and 

confirmed  the  Knowledges  of  faith,  although  from  the 
sphere  of  persuasions  they  seem  to  themselves  to  be 
driven  as  it  were  into  denial,  still  it  is  dispelled  .  .  .  and 
the  denial  is  driven  away,  then  the  doubt,  and  then 
the  obscurity  .  .  . 

356o,e.  If  those  who  do  not  believe  were  taken  into 
Heaven,  and  were  to  acknowledge  and  confess ;  when 
let  back,  they  at  once  deny  as  before  that  Heaven 
exists. 

3623.  That  delights  and  pleasures  are  never  denied 
to  man. 

.  They  have  never  been  denied  to  me  .  .  . 

5150.  On  those  who  deny  God  confirmatively  .  .  . 

5669.  They  from  whom  this  sphere  (of  violation) 
exhales,  are  they  who  in  their  heart  deny  the  Divine, 
and  those  things  which  are  of  the  Church  ;  but  outwardly 
appear  civil,  bland,  moral. 


6029.  On  those  who  do  not  think  anything  about  the 
Divine,  but  still  do  not  deny  these  things. 

E.  136.  'Thou  hast  not  denied  the  faith'  (Rev.ii.  13) 
=  constancy  in  truths.  'Not  to  deny,'  when  predicated 
of  faith  =  to  be  constant ;  for  he  who  is  constant,  does 
not  deny. 

209.  'Thou  hast  not  denied  My  name '  =  that  they 
acknowledge  the  Divine  of  the  Lord  in  His  Human. 

670.  Love  draws  .  .  .  the  thoughts  into  its  own  side  ; 
wherefore,  when  they  think  in  solitude  they  entirely 
deny  the  things  they  confess  with  the  mouth  before  the 
world. 

Ath.  84.  The  sin  against  the  Holy  Spirit  is  the  denial 
of  the  Lord  in  the  Word  ;  for  they  who  deny  this, 
tacitly  and  at  heart  deny  all  things  of  Heaven  and  the 
Church,  because  all  these  are  from  the  Word  ;  and  they 
deny  that  the  Lord  is  Divine. 

95.  To  deny  the  Divine  of  the  Lord,  and  thus  the 
Word,  is  the  sin  against  the  Holy  Spirit. 

147.  Everything  of  love  and  faith  depends  thereon  ; 
wherefore,  they  who  deny  God,  because  there  is  disjunc- 
tion from  Him,  are  in  Hell. 

Depart.     Decedere. 
Departure.    Decessus. 

A.  1637.  Little  children  who  have  departed  before 
they  have  learned  any  language  .  .  . 

8029.  All  men  after  their  departure  are  first  below 
Heaven  among  Spirits  .  .  . 

T.  1602.  All  who  depart  from  the  natural  world  .  .  . 


D.  406.  Not  long  departed  from  the  life  of  the  body. 
7586. 
2030.  On  a  certain  person  newly  departed. 
3546.  An  Angel  who  had  departed  in  infancy  .  .  . 

Depart.     Discedere. 
Departure.    Discessus. 

See  under  Journey,  and  Move  away. 

A.  2559.  'When  God  made  me  depart  from  my  father's 
house'  (Gen.  xx.  13)  =  when  He  left  behind  what  is 
scientific  and  the  appearances  thence,  with  their  delights. 
.  .  .  'To  depart' =  to  leave  behind. 

7972.  The  first  state  of  departure,  and  its  quality. 
Sig.  

D.  192.  The  approach  and  the  departure  (of  Spirits). 
313.  Some  had  departed  [this  life]  a  few  years  before. 

E.  61718.  'Depart  from  Me,  workers  of  iniquity'  (Luke 
xiii.27).  Ex. 

Depart.     Excedere. 
Departure.    Excessus. 

See  also  Exceed. 

P.  69.  After  his  departure  out  of  the  world.  101-. 
M.22. 

T.  6073.  When  man  departs  out  of  the  natural 
world  .  .  . 


Depend 


116 


Deprive 


Depend.      Dependere. 
Dependence.     Dependentia. 

A.  2026e.  On  the  Heaven  of  Angels  depends  the 
Heaven  of  Angelic  Spirits  .  .  . 

6465.  The  posterior  depends  upon  the  prior  .  .  . 

8728.  Perpetual  dependence  thence.  Sig.  .  .  'To 
judge,'  here,  =  subordinate  disposition,  which  is  depend- 
ence. 

.  The  Angels  and  the  angelic  Societies  are  in  such 

.subordination  and  dependence  .  .  . 

M.  216a.  Their  love  depends  upon  their  husbands. 

D.  486.  Unless  they  depended  on  a  single  love,  which 
is  Divine  .  .  . 

Depopulate.     See  Ravage. 

Deportation.      Deportatio.     E.40318. 

Deposit.     See  Lay  up-reponere. 

Deposit.     Positio.    A.8455.  8456. 

Depravity.     Pravifas,  Depravare. 
A.  1260.  In  a  depraved  Church. 

43 1 75.  The  interior  form  itself ...  is  depraved  .  .  . 

5i85e.  Not  so  much  from  evil  of  life,  as  from  natural 
depravity.     D.893. 

86222.  They  pervert  and  utterly  deprave  the  affections 
of  truth  and  good. 

Deprecate.     See  under  Entreat. 

Deprive.     Privare,  Deprivare. 
Deprivation.     Privatio,  Deprivatio. 

A.  2689.  Such  do  not  know  what  it  is  to  grieve  on 
this  account,  that  they  are  deprived  of  truths  ;  they 
believe  that  anxiety  is  possible  only  because  one  is 
deprived  of  the  goods  of  the  body  and  the  world.  But 
they  who  are  able  to  be  reformed  .  .  .  come  into  anxiety 
when  they  are  deprived  (of  good  and  truth). 

2.   All  anxiety  and  grief  is  from  this  source,  that 

one  is  deprived  of  those  things  which  he  loves  .  .  . 

2S89.  They  believe  that  if  they  were  deprived  (of 
cupidities  and  persuasions),  nothing  of  life  would  be  left. 
39384- 

3607.  The  inversion  and  privation  of  the  life  of  truth 
from  self.  Sig. 

.   'To  kill  Jacob  his  brother '  =  to  deprive  truth 

of  life  from  self.     3610. 

3610.  When  they  who  are  in  such  affection  of  truth 
are  deprived  of  this  life,  they  then  first  receive  life  .  .  . 
But  they  who  are  in  the  affection  of  self  and  the  world, 
believe  .  .  .  that  if  they  were  deprived  of  that  life,  they 
would  not  live  at  all  .  .  .  When  yet  the  case  is,  that 
when  they  are  deprived  of  that  life,  namely,  of  the 
affection  of  self  and  of  the  world,  life  flows  in  from  the 
Lord  .  .  . 

3.  That  good  had  the  disposition  of  inverting  the 

state,  and  of  depriving  truth  of  life  from  itself.  Sig. 
and  Ex. 

40542.  I  perceived  from  the  .  .  .  privation  of  affection, 
that  such  Societies  were  present. 


4220e.  They  are  deprived  of  all  intelligence  .  .  . 

5270.  'There  shall  be  seven  years  of  famine'  =  the 
apparent  lack  and  privation  of  truth. 

5376.  How  the  case  is  with  the  desolation  of  the 
Natural,  or  with  the  privation  of  truth  there.  Ex. 

69143.  They  are  kept  in  the  fear  ...  of  the  depriva- 
tion of  possessions  in  that  region  of  Heaven  .  .  . 

70973.  Lest  they  should  abuse  the  truths  of  faith,  they 
are  deprived  of  them  .  .  . 

7217.  'Straitness  of  spirit '  =  anxiety  on  account  of 
the  deprivation  of  the  truth  which  is  of  faith,  and  of 
the  good  which  is  of  charity,  and  a  consequent  state 
near  to  despair. 

2.  When  they  suppose  themselves  to  be  deprived 

of  the  truths  and  goods  of  faith  and  charity,  such  are 
affected  as  with  the  death  agony  .  .  . 

7295s.  The  three  degrees  of  the  taking  away  and 
deprivation  of  the  influx  of  truth  and  good.  Sig. 

e.   By  such  degrees,  the  evil  in  the  other  life  are 

deprived  of  the  understanding  of  truth  and  good. 

91S9.  'Thou  shalt  not  vivify '  =  the  deprivation  of 
spiritual  life. 

.  Those  deprive  themselves  of  spiritual  life  who 

conjoin  to  the  truths  of  faith  falsities  from  the  evil  of 
self-love. 

9205.  'I  will  kill  you  with  the  sword '  =  that  they 
will  deprive  themselves  of  good  and  truth  by  means  of 
falsities. 

99602.  When  nakedness  regards  the  head,  which  is 
baldness,  it  =  the  deprivation  of  intelligence  of  truth 
and  wisdom  of  good  ;  when  it  regards  the  whole  body, 
it  =  the  deprivation  of  the  truths  which  are  of  faith  ; 
and  when  it  regards  the  loins  and  genitals,  it  =  the 
deprivation  of  the  good  of  love.  Ex. 

H.  i55e.  'Night'  =  the  deprivation  of  love  and 
wisdom. 

208.  As  soon  as  this  is  done,  the  Angel  is  deprived  of 
his  intelligence  and  wisdom. 

400.  They  come  into  the  delight  of  their  concupiscence 
from  the  deprivation  and  removal  of  heavenly  delight 
with  those  who  are  in  it. 


D.  4439e.  They  deprive  all  others  of  their  delight .  .  . 

E.  384.  The  deprivation  of  all  the  good  and  thence 
of  all  the  truth  from  the  Word,  and  thence  in  their 
doctrine  of  the  Church  from  the  Word.   Sig. 

.   'To  kill '  =  to  deprive  of  good  and  truth. 

.  They  who  are  in  evils  and  falsities,   deprive 

themselves  of  all  the  perception  of  good  and  of  the 
understanding  of  truth  from  the  Word,  and  thence  in 
their  doctrine  of  the  Church.  Ex. 

386.  '  Hunger '  =  the  privation  of  the  Knowledges  of 
truth  and  good,  also  the  lack  and  ignorance  of  them. 

.   It  is  said  that  '  hunger  '  =  the  deprivation  of 

the  Knowledges  of  truth  and  good,  also  the  lack  and 
ignorance  of  them,  because  deprivation  exists  with 
those  who  are  in  evils  and  thence  falsities,  lack  with 
those  who  are  not  able  to  know  them,  and  ignorance 
with  those  who  know  there  are  such  things  and  therefore 
long  for  them. 


Deride 


117 


Derive 


3.  The  deprivation  of  all  truth  and  thence  of  all 

good.  Sig. 

5.   '  Famine '  =  the  deprivation  of  the  Knowledges 

of  good  .  .  .  '  the  sword, '  the  deprivation  of  the  Know- 
ledges of  truth  .  .  . 

7.  'The  sword '  =  the  deprivation  of  truth  by- 
means  of  falsities  ;  'famine,'  the  deprivation  of  good  by 
means  of  evils  ;  and  'pestilence,'  the  deprivation  of 
spiritual  life.     8. 

59ie.  Spiritual  life  is  extinguished  by  means  of  per- 
versions of  good  and  falsifications  of  truth  ;  also  by 
means  of  deprivations  of  the  Knowledges  of  truth  and 


654s5.  The  deprivation  of  all  truth  on  account  of 
recession.  Sig. 

677s.  The  signs  of  the  presence  of  such  are  .  .  .  the 
deprivation  of  the  perception  of  good  .  .  . 

Deride.     See  Mock. 
Derive.     Derivare. 

Derivation.    Derivatio. 

Derivative.      Derivativus. 

See  Principiate,  and  under  JjEAV-ducere. 

A.  12 14.  'The  sons  of  Ham '  =  the  derivations  of 
doctrinal  things  and  worships  from  corrupt  internal 
worship. 

1330.  'These  are  the  nativities  of  Shem'  =  the  deriva- 
tions of  the  second  Ancient  Church.  '  Nativities  '  =  the 
origin  and  derivation  of  doctrinal  things  and  worships. 

1339.   '  Begat  Shelah '  =  derivation  thence. 

27624.  From  the  Ancient  Church,  the  signification  of 
a  horse  .  .  .  was  derived  to  the  wise  round  about,  also 
into  Greece. 

2847.  'In  multiplying  I  will  multiply '  =  the  deriva- 
tions of  truth  from  affection. 

29732.  Represented  the  celestial  and  spiritual  things 
flowing  forth  and  derived  thence  in  order. 

31 16.  The  derivations  thence  as  from  their  root,  or 
as  from  their  seed,  devive-trahunt- their  form  .  .  . 

3240.  The  derivations  from  the  first  lot.  Sig. 

.  By  these  are  signified  the  states  and  derivations 

of  the  Lord's  Spiritual  Church. 

2.  Hence,  now,  are  the  derivations  ;  namely,  the 

derivations  of  good  and  the  derivations  of  truth  ;  the 
derivations  of  good  in  the  Lord's  Spiritual  Kingdom, 
which  are  represented  by  'the  sons  of  Jokshan  ;'  and  the 
derivations  of  truth  there,  which  are  represented  by 
'the  sons  of  Midian.' 

3242.  Derivations  from  the  third  lot.  Sig. 

.   '  Sons '  —  the  derivations  thence. 

3263.  The  derivations  of  the  Spiritual  Church  repre- 
sented by  '  Ishmael. '  Sig. 

.    '  Nativities  '  =  the  derivations  of  faith,  thus  of 

the  Church.  Refs.     3267. 

3267.  The  interior  qualities  according  to  the  deriva- 
tions of  faith.  Sig. 

2.  These  varieties  are  the  derivations  which  are 

signified  by  'nativities.' 


3279.  ' Nativities '  =  derivations;  namely,  the  deriva- 
tions of  faith  when  faith  is  treated  of,  and  the  derivations 
of  the  Church  when  the  Church  is  treated  of. 

3469s.  This  is  derived  into  the  children  .  .  . 

3562.  The  things  beneath  are  nothing  but  derivations 
and  compositions  thence. 

3579.  This  good  .  .  .  again  produces  good  ;  and, 
through  this  good,  truths  again,  which  are  derivations. 

4i74e.  When  good  flows  in,  they  derive  it  into  them- 
selves, and  into  their  own  proprium  .  .  . 

4642.  In  what  follows,  the  Lord's  Divine  natural 
good  is  treated  of,  but  its  derivations  are  described  by 
names  .  .  .  because  the  derivations  of  this  good  exceed 
the  understanding  of  any  man  or  Angel.  .  .  But  still, 
when  this  chapter  is  read,  the  derivations  which  are 
contained  in  the  names,  are  represented  to  the  Angels 


4643e 
second. 

4646. 


5  "4- 


and  the 


way  .  .  . 
The  first  derivations  thence  . 
Sig. 

Derivations  in  Divine  natural  good.  Sig. 
The  quality  of  the  derivations.  Sig. 
The  first  derivation  of  good.  Sig. 
,  The  third  derivation.  Sig. 
'In   the  vine  three  shoots '  =  the  derivations 
thence  even  to  the  ultimate  one.  .  .  '  Shoots '  =  deriva- 
tions ;  for  as  'the  vine' =  the  Intellectual,   'the  shoots' 
are  nothing  but  the  derivations  thence.     5122. 

6310.  The  interiors  of  man  are  distinct  according  to 
degrees  by  means  of  derivations. 

6583.  The  establishment  of  the  Church  as  to  the 
Intellectual  and  the  derivatives  thereof.  Sig. 

.   'The  tertian   sons '  =  the    derivatives;    for   as 

sons  and  son's  sons  descend  from  a  parent,  they  =  the 
derivatives  of  that  thing  which  is  represented  by  the 
parent. 

6584.  And  as  to  the  Voluntary  and  its  derivatives. 
Sig. 

.  The  derivatives  of  the  Voluntary  of  the  Church, 

which  are  signified  by  'the  sons  of  Machir,'  are  goods 
conjoined  with  truths,  thus  also  truths  from  good  ;  for 
the  truths  which  are  derived  from  good  are  the  forms  of 
good. 

6647.  '  To  be  produced '  =  further  derivation  ;  for  when 
the  Church  has  been  established  with  a  man,  good  con- 
tinually grows  and  is  derived,  both  in  the  internal  and 
also  towards  the  external,  and  therein. 

6648.  'To  become  numerous' = further  derivation, 
thus  continual  increase  of  truth. 

70042.  Order  has  been  so  instituted,  that  the  First 
being  may  be  in  the  things  derived  mediately  and 
immediately  .  .  .  Divine  truth  itself  is  the  only  substan- 
tial thing  ;  the  things  derived  are  nothing  but  successive 
forms  thence. 

72303.  The  first  class  of  the  derivations  of  good  and 
truth  thence.   Sig. 

.  The  second  class  of  the  derivations  of  good  and 

truth  thence.  Sig. 

.  The  third  class  of  the  derivations  of  good  and 

truth.  Sig. 


Derive 


118 


Derogate 


[A.72303].  The  conjunction  of  derived  good  with  related 
truth.  Sig. 

4.  A  successive  derivation  from  the  second  class, 

which  is  good  and  thence  truth.  Sig. 

.  A  second  successive  derivation  from  the  same 

class,  as  to  good  in  truth.  Sig. 

.  The  derivations  of  faith   and  charity,    their 

quality.  Sig. 

5.  A  repeated  derivation  from  the  second  class. 

Sig. 

e.  Derivation  (from  the  conjunction  of  good  and 

truth  in  these  doctrinal  things).  Sig. 

73182.  Truth  is  falsified,  when  it  is  said  that  the  Lord 
derived  all  sins  into  Himself .  .  . 

7374.  They  are  in  the  love  of  the  world,  who  desire 
to  derive  into  themselves  the  goods  of  others. 

7966e.  There  are  such  productions  and  derivations  of 
truth  with  those  who  are  of  the  Spiritual  Church.  Rep. 

8550.  All  the  evil  which  by  means  of  habit  has  taken 
on  nature,  is  derived  into  the  offspring  .  .  .  The  deriva- 
tion of  evil  from  this  source  at  last  becomes  so  great, 
that  everything  of  man's  proper  life  is  nothing  but  evil. 
This  derived  Continuous  is  not  broken  and  altered, 
except  by  means  of  a  life  of  faith  and  charity  from  the 
Lord.     N.  175. 

86032.  The  derivations  and  thence  the  successions  in 
general,  as  to  their  quality,  may  be  presented  to  the 
idea  by  means  of  fruits.  Ex. 

8719.  To  derive  also  to  others.  Sig. 

89S2.  'Sons  and  daughters '  =  the  truths  and  goods 
derived  thence. 

c.   '  Nativities '  =  derivations. 

9079.  Insult  by  the  affection  of  evil  against  the  truths 
and  goods  of  faith  derived  from  interior  things.   Sig. 

.  The  reason  they  are  truths  and  goods  derived 

from  interior  things,  is  that  interior  things  are  as 
parents,  from  which  goods  and  truths  are  born  as  sons 
and  daughters. 

91412.  This  is  the  derivation  of  this  word.     9303. 

9325s.  Goods  and  truths  and  their  derivations.  Sig. 

9568.  Good  is  that  from  which  are  truths,  and  truths 
from  good  are  the  things  from  which  are  scientifics  ; 
thus  is  derived  and  produced  the  one  from  the  other  ; 
but  still  good  is  in  all  the  things  produced  and  derived, 
because  they  are  from  good. 

3.  Hence   it  may  be  evident,   how  the   one   is 

produced  and  derived  from  the  other,  and  that  the  first 
is  everything  in  the  things  produced  and  derived  .  .  . 

iooii.  What  is  inmost  in  the  Heavens  inflows  into 
the  Heavens  which  are  below,  and  produces  and  derives 
them  .  .  .  That  which  is  inmost  is  the  only  thing  which 
essentially  lives  in  the  things  derived. 

H.  286e.  From  peace  by  derivation  the  Angels  have 
all  blessedness  .  .  . 

399.  Self-love  abstracts  all  delight  from  others,  and 
derives  it  into  itself .  .  .     4004. 

424.  He  wants  to  derive  into  himself  the  goods  of  all 
others  .  .  . 

S532.  As  from  a  plane  of  derivation  .  .  . 


W.  3632.  See  DESitt-cupire,  at  this  ref. 

3.  From  these  two  are  ultimately  derived  sensa- 
tions .  .  . 

P.  28s.  Affections  are  derivations  from  the  love  of 
each  person. 

33.  The  derivations  which  are  the  affections  of  this 
love,  are  as  many  as  are  the  evils  into  which  it  determines 
itself. 

1062.  The  love  of  each  person  cannot  exist  without 
derivations,  which  are  called  affections  ;  the  derivations 
of  infernal  love  are  affections  of  evil  and  falsity,  properly 
concupiscences  ;  and  the  derivations  of  heavenly  love 
are  affections  of  good  and  truth,  properly  dilections. 

2062.  The  concupiscences  of  evil,  which  are  derivations 
of  it,  have  life  in  them  from  it. 

875s.  The  derivations  of  love  are  called  affections  .  .  . 
M.197.     I.84.  ' 

46 16.  In  derivation  it  is  called  delight .  .  .  and  in 
the  universal  sense,  Good. 


D.  4439.  Wherever  they  go  they  derive  to  themselves 
the  delights  of  others. 

e.  They  who  are  in  self-love  deprive  all  others  of 

their  delight,  and  derive  it  into  themselves. 

46o8e.  The  singles  by  derivation  from  principles  make 
one. 

46274.  In  universal  nature  there  are  perpetual  com- 
positions and  derivations  .  .  . 

4864.  The  derivations  were  similar,  as  it  were  of 
children  .  .  . 

e.  The  examination  of  derivation  as  of  families . . . 

E.  7753.  The  organs  (of  sense  and  motion)  are  deriva- 
tions thence,  just  as  streams  are  from  their  springs,  or 
as  principiates  from  their  principles,  or  as  substantiates 
from  their  substances  ;  and  these  derivations  are  of  such 
a  nature,  that  the  brains  are  present  everywhere  .  .  . 

828s.  They  are  the  derivations  and  productions  of  the 
uses  before  mentioned  .  .  . 

Derogate.     Derogare. 

A.  18 132.   He  derogates  from   the  Lord  that  which' 
is  His. 

847s4.  They  take  away  providence  from  the  Divine, 
and  claim  it  for  themselves.     T.439. 

H.  587s.  One  rages  against  another  who  derogates 
from  his  divine  Power. 

Descartes.      Cartes  ins. 
I.  19.  See  Aristotle  at  this  ref. 

Inv.  13.  The  hypothesis  of  the  learned  concerning  the 
soul,  especially  of  Descartes  and  others,  that  it  is  a 
substance  separate  from  the  body,  in  some  place 
or  other. 

Descend.     Descendere. 
Descent.     Descensus. 

See  Flow  down. 

A.  1311.  'Jehovah  came  down'  (Gen. xi. 5)=  judgment 
upon  them.  .  .  'To  come  down,'  relatively  to  Jehovah, 
is  predicated  when  judgment  takes  place  .  .  . 


Descend 


119 


Descend 


3.   'To   come    down'    is   predicated   of  Jehovah, 

because  '  most  high '  is  predicated  of  Him  .  .  .  111. 

1320.  'Come,  let  us  go  down'  (ver.7)=judgment  so 
done. 

2242.  'I  will  go  down  I  pray,  and  I  will  see'  (Gen. 
xviii.2i)  =  visitation.  'To  go  down  to  see '=  judgment ; 
thus,  it  =  visitation  .  .  . 

.  To  descend  cannot  be  predicated  of  the  Lord, 

because  He  is  always  in  the  highest .  .  . 

2299s.  Afterwards,  I  saw  represented  by  them  the 
descent  of  the  Lord  to  the  bound  .  .  .     H.3352. 

2454s.  'Let  him  not  come  down  to  take  them  away' 
(Luke  xvii.  3 1 )  =  to  turn  himself  away  from  good  to  truth. 

270215.  'To  go  down  into  the  plain'  (Ezek.xlvii.8)=: 
the  doctrinal  things  which  are  of  the  Rational. 

3084.  Hence  it  is  that  'to  ascend'  is  predicated 
towards  Jerusalem,  but  'to  descend'  from  Jerusalem. 

2.  Therefore  it  is  here  first  said  that  the  affection 

of  truth,  which  is  represented  by  'Rebekah,'  'went 
down  to  the  fountain, '  and  presently,  that  it  '  went  up ' 
(Gen.xxiv.  16)  ;  for  Divine  love  inflows  into  the  affection 
of  good,  and  thence  into  the  affection  of  truth,  and 
vivifies  and  enlightens  those  things  which  are  in  the 
natural  man,  and  then  disposes  them  into  order  ;  this  is 
signified  by  'to  descend.' 

3701.  See  Ascend  at  these  refs.  3702.  3882s.  4009. 
4042.  5406.   5492e.  H.35.  L.3511.    W.199.  218.  M.302. 

.  3721.  The  natural  mind  is  that  through  which  .  .  . 
the  things  of  the  Lord  inflow  and  descend  into  nature, 
and  through  the  same  mind  those  things  which  are  of 
nature  ascend. 

3882s.  Descent  is  nothing  else  than  from  good  to 
behold  truth,  as  from  a  mountain  .  .  . 

4279.  As  the  Word  is  from  the  Lord,  and  descends 
from  Him  through  Heaven  to  man,  it  is  Divine  as  to  every 
single  thing  ;  and,  as  it  has  descended  from  the  Lord, 
so  it  ascends,  that  is.  is  elevated  to  Him,  and  this 
through  the  Heavens  .  .  .  Wherefore,  when  the  Word 
ascends  as  it  descends,  in  the  Lord  it  is  Divine,  in  the 
Third  Heaven  it  is  celestial .  .  . 

4785.  'I  will  go  down  to  the  grave  to  my  son  mourn- 
ing' (Gen.xxxvii.35)  =  that  the  Ancient  Church  would 
perish. 

4815.  Therefore  it  was  said  'to  descend'  from  Zion 
and  Jerusalem  towards  the  boundaries,  but  from  the 
boundaries  to  Jerusalem  and  Zion,  '  to  ascend. '  Hence 
it  is,  that  'to  ascend'  involves  elevation  to  truth  and 
good,  and  '  to  descend, '  casting  down  to  falsity  and  evil 
.  .  .  Hence  it  is  here  said,  that  'Judah  went^down  from 
his  brethren'  (Gen.xxxviii.  1).     4816. 

4964.  '(Joseph)  was  made  to  go  down  to  Egypt'  (Gen. 
xxxix.  1 )  =  to  the  scientifics  which  are  of  the  Church.  Ex. 

4969.  'Who  made  him  go  down  thither'  (id. )  =  from 
that  good  to  these  scientifics.  .  .  It  is  said  'to  go  down,' 
because  it  treats  of  scientifics,  which  are  exterior  things  ; 
for  in  the  Word  to  go  from  interior  to  exterior  things  is 
called  'going  down,'  but  from  exterior  to  interior  things, 
'going  up.' 

5406.   'Go  down  thither,  and  buy  for  us  from  thence' 


(Gen. xlii. 2)  =  appropriation  thereby  ;  (for)  'to  go  down' 
is  predicated  of  going  towards  exterior  things. 

5546.  'My  son  shall  not  go  down  with  you'  (ver.38) 
=  that  he  will  not  let  himself  down  to  lower  things. 
'To  go  down'  is  predicated  of  going  towards  lower 
things  ;  here,  to  the  scientific  truths  which  are  in  the 
interior  Natural. 

5602.  That  this  truth  of  good  should  be  conjoined 
with  him,  is  signified  by  their  'causing  him  (Benjamin) 
to  go  down'  (Gen.xliii.7). 

5637.  'They  rose  up  and  went  down  to  Egypt'  (ver. 
15)  =  elevation  to  procure  themselves  life  from  the  in- 
terior things  of  scientifics  ...  'To  go  down '  =  to  procure 
themselves  life.  Ex. 

5655.  'Coming  down  we  came  down  at  the  beginning 
to  buy  food'  (ver. 20)  =  the  disposition  of  procuring  good 
for  truths.  .  .  'To  come  down '  =  the  disposition  or  in- 
tention ;  for  he  who  comes  down,  or  betakes  himself 
anywhere,  does  it  with  a  disposition. 

5660.  'Other  silver  we  cause  to  come  down  in  our 
hand'  (ver. 22)  =  that  there  is  a  disposition  to  procure 
good  elsewhere  by  means  of  truth.  .  .  'To  cause  to  come 
down'  =  a  disposition  to  procure. 

5809.  'Cause  him  to  come  down  unto  me'  (Gen.xliv. 
2i)  =  that  this  new  truth  should  be  subjected  to  internal 
good.  Ex. 

5832.  'Ye  will  make  my  grey  hair  to  go  down  in  evil 
to  the  grave'  (ver. 29)  =  that  spiritual  good  would  perish, 
and  thus  the  internal  of  the  Church.  .  .  'To  go  down  in 
good  into  the  grave '  =  to  rise  again,  and  to  be  regener- 
ated ;  therefore  'to  go  down  in  evil  into  the  grave,'  is 
the  opposite,  thus  to  perish. 

58979.  Lest  they  descend  from  good,  and  look  back- 
wards ...  is  signified  by  'he  who  is  upon  the  house,  let 
him  not  go  down  to  take  anything  out  of  the 
house  .  .  .' 

5909.  'Come  down  unto  me,  tarry  not'  (Gen.xlv.9)  = 
sure  conjunction.  'To  come  down,'  or,  to  come  to  me, 
=  conjunction. 

6004.  'Fear  not  to  go  down  into  Egypt'  (Gen.xlvi.3)= 
tli at  natural  truth,  with  all  things  belonging  to  it,  must 
be  initiated  into  the  scientifics  of  the  Church.  .  .  'To  go 
down'  =  to  be  initiated  ;  for,  in  order  that  this  initiation 
might  be  represented,  Jacob  with  all  that  belonged  to 
him  went  down  into  Egypt. 

6023.  'To  go  down  into  Egypt '  =  to  initiate  truth, 
and  to  gather  them  into  the  scientifics  of  the  Church. 

6075.  They  are  called  'fathers,'  because  from  them  the 
Church  has  descended  .  .  . 

622 1 e.  As  to  each  and  all  things,  the  Word  has 
descended  from  the  Lord  ...  In  its  descent  it  has 
clothed  itself  with  forms  adapted  to  apprehension  in  the 
three  Heavens,  and  at  last  with  a  form  for  the  appre- 
hension of  man  .  .  . 

6854.  See  Deliver  at  this  ref. 

.  With  the  Lord's  descending,  the  case  is  this  .  .  . 

2.  This  is  what  is  meant  by  the  descent  of  the 

Lord  to  the  inhabitants  of  the  infernal  regions-ad 
inferos.     8018. 

7787.  'All  thy  servants  shall  come  down  unto  me' 
(Ex.xi.8)  =  those  who  are  subordinate. 


Descend 


120 


Descend 


[A.]  7985.  From  the  (time  of  the)  descent  of  Jacob 
into  Egypt  .  .  . 

8279.  'They  went  down  into  the  deeps  as  a  stone' 
(Ex.xv.5)=that  they  fell  to  lower  things  as  by  their 
weight. 

8792.  'Jehovah  will  come  down  to  the  eyes  of  all  the 
people'  (Ex.xix. ii)  =  the  Advent  of  the  Lord,  and  then 
enlightenment.  'To  come  down,'  when  said  of  Jehovah, 
that  is,  the  Lord,  =  His  presence  by  means  of  influx, 
thus  His  Advent.  Here  the  Advent  of  the  Lord  is  meant 
by  the  descent  of  Jehovah  to  the  eyes  of  all  the  people  .  .  . 

8805.  'Moses  came  down  from  the  mountain  to  the 
people'  (ver.  14)  =  application  and  preparation  by  means 
of  truth  from  the  Divine  to  receive  truths  in  good.  'To 
come  down,'  when  said  of  Moses,  =  application,  and  also 
preparation  thereby. 

2.  The  descent  of  Jehovah  upon  Mount  Sinai  = 

His  presence  in  Heaven.     8826. 

8840.   'Away  and  go  down'  (ver.24)  =  infiux. 

89202.  When  truth  Divine  descends  through  the 
Heavens  to  men,  as  the  Word  has  descended,  it  is  ac- 
commodated on  the  way  to  all  in  Heaven  and  on  earth. 

893 ie.  In  order  that  they  might  know  that  the  Word 
was  from  the  Divine  through  Heaven,  the  Lord  Himself 
willed  to  descend,  and  promulgate  the  ten  command- 
ments with  a  living  voice  .  .  . 

91 10.  Then  the  spiritual  man  descends,  that  is,  thinks 
in  the  natural. 

98064.  'That  went  down  upon  the  mouth  of  his 
garments'  (Ps.cxxxiii.2)  ...  'To  go  down '  =  influx. 

99055.  All  things  which  are  of  light  from  the  Divine 
descend  even  to  the  ultimate  ends  .  .  . 

101S42.  'To  go  down  to  take  something  out  of  the 
house '  =  a  return  to  the  former  state. 

10396.  'To  delay  to  come  down'  (Ex.xxxii.  1),  when 
said  of  the  apperception  of  Divine  truth  from  the  Word, 
=  not  to  flow  in  ;  for  the  Divine  truth  which  inflows 
with  man  is  said  to  descend  from  Heaven. 

10413.  The  difference  between  the  elevation  to  a  state 
of  loves  with  the  good,  and  with  the  evil,  is  that  the 
good  then  ascend,  and  the  evil  descend.  Ex. 

10419.  'Go,  get  thee  down'  (Ex.xxxii. 7)  =  a  looking 
into  their  external.  'To  go  down  from  Mount  Sinai' = 
to  look  into,  review,  and  examine  ;  for  'Mount  Sinai'  = 
Heaven,  from  which  is  Divine  truth  ;  and  'to  descend 
thence,'  in  the  spiritual  sense,  is  not  to  descend  with  the 
body,  but  with  the  mind,  thus  it  is  to  look  into  and 
review. 

10450.  'And  Moses  looked  back  and  went  down  from 
the  Mount'  (ver.  15)  =  the  Word  let  down  from  Heaven. 
'To  look  back  and  go  down,'  when  said  of  the  Word,= 
to  be  let  down. 

10540.  'Make  thine  ornament  to  descend  from  upon 
thee'  (Ex.xxxiii.5)  =  the  quality  of  their  external  with- 
out the  Divine.  .  .  'To  make  it  descend  from  upon 
them'  =  to  put  it  off,  thus  to  be  without  it. 

10689.  '  It  came  to  pass  as  Moses  descended  from 
Mount  Sinai'  (Ex.xxxiv.29)  =  the  influx  of  the  internal 


into  the  external  of  the  Word,  of  the  Chnrch,  and  of 
worship. 

10814.  This  love  increases  in  descending  .  .  . 

H.  3072.  'The  holy  city  descending  from  God  out 
of  Heaven'  =  its  heavenly  doctrine  revealed  by  the 
Lord.     R.879. 

373.   It  thence  descends  into  the  body  .  .  . 

.   Whatever   descends   from    the    spiritual   man 

into  the  body,  presents  itself  there  under  a  different 
appearance. 

W.  218.  These  ascending  and  descending  degrees 
.  .  .     274. 

2754.  This  truth  on  the  way  in  its  descent  was  by 
degrees  turned  into  falsity  .  .  .     (T.  135). 

R.  195.  'Which  cometh  down  out  of  Heaven  from  my 
God''  (Rev. iii.  1 2)  —  which  will  be  of  the  Lord's  Divine 
truth,  such  as  it  is  in  Heaven. 

465.  'I  saw  another  mighty  Angel  coming  down  from 
Heaven'  (Rev.x. i)  =  the  Lord  in  Divine  majesty  and 
power. 

558.  'Because  the  devil  hath  come  down  to  you, 
having  great  anger'  (Rev.xii.  i2)  =  to  those  who  are  in 
the  World  of  Spirits  ;  and  as  these  are  in  conjunction 
with  the  men  of  the  Earth,  it  also  =  to  such  in  the  Earth. 


754- 

xviii.  1) 


'An  Angel  coming  down  from  Heaven'  (Rev, 
=  the  influx  of  the  Lord  out  of  Heaven. 


875.  I  saw  two  Angels  descending  from  Heaven  .  .  . 
T.386. 

879e.  It  is  said  (of  the  holy  city)  'coming  down  from 
God  out  of  Heaven,'  because  from  the  Lord  through  the 
New  Christian  Heaven. 

M.  4.  The  Angels  said,  Let  us  descend  .  .  . 
1833.   In  the  descent  into  the  body  .  .  . 
402.  The  love  for  little  children  descends,  and  does 
not  ascend.  Gen.  art. 

B.  117.  Jehovah  descended  and  assumed  the  Human 
,  .  .     T.3.  82.  838. 

T.  242.  Man  thus  prepares  the  way  by  which  God 
descends  and  elevates  him. 

77e.  They  then  descended  ;  and  as  they  descended 
the  love  of  evil  returned  .  .  . 

8oe.  As  he  descended,  forgetfulness  expelled  recollec- 
tion .  .  .  and  he  became  as  insane  as  ever. 

85.  That  Jehovah  God  descended  as  Divine  truth  .  .  . 
86.  88.  Can.  Redeemer  ii. 

89.  As  God  descended  .  .  . 

92.  By  being  sent  into  the  world  is  meant  to 
descend  .  .  . 

1353.  Then,  by  command  of  the  Lord,  there  descended 
three  Angels  from  Heaven  .  .  . 

193.  The  Word  in  its  bosom  is  spiritual,  because  it 
descended  from  Jehovah,  and  passed  through  the 
angelic  Heavens  .  .  . 

69 12.  The  Lord  Himself  does  not  descend,  but  an 
Angel  .  .  . 

716.   'HecamedownfromHeaven'withtheDivine.  111. 


Descendant 


121 


Desert 


784.  As  this  New  Heaven  .  .  .  grows,  so  from  that 
Heaven  descends  the  New  Jerusalem  .  .  . 

85 1 e.  Now,  when  the  New  Church  is  commencing,  or 
when  the  New  Jerusalem  is  descending  from  Heaven. 


E.  37526.  Its  'descending  upon  the  mouth  of  his 
garments '  =  that  thence  is  all  the  good  and  delight  of 
Heaven  from  inmosts  to  ultimates.  .  .  By  'to  descend 
upon  the  mouth  of  the  garments '  is"signified  the  influx 
and  conjunction  of  celestial  good  and  spiritual  good. 

.    'As  the  dew  of  Herrnon  which  descended  upon 

the  mountains  of  Zion'  =  the  conjunction  of  truth 
and  good. 

40542.  The  Last  Judgment  is  meant  by  '  Jehovah  .  .  . 
cometh  down'  (Micahi.3). 

Descendant.     See  Posterity. 

Describe.     Describere. 
Description.     Descriptio. 

A.  801.  Are  here  described  .  .  .     . 

2.  When  man  is   described  in  the  Word,  he  is 

described  distinctly,  as  to  the  one  part,  and  as  to  the 
other.  .  .  Thus  there  is  a  full  description  of  everything. 

21832.  These  things  can  hardly  be  described  to  the 
common  apprehension  .  .  . 

26iSe.  By  description  from  such  things  they  are  more 
obscured. 

2795.  If  they  were  described,  even  most  clearly,  they 
would  still  appear  obscure.     43022. 

4645e.  That  all  things  cannot  be  described.  Sig. 

5228.  This  does  not  enter  the  sense,  however  it  is 
described. 

6486.  Few  of  these  things  can  be  described  .  .  . 

7i3ie.  The  singular  truths,  which  are  the  interiors  of 
faith,  can  never  be  described  .  .  . 

8625e.  Their  malignity  cannot  be  described. 

H.  409.  Heavenly  joy  itself,  such  as  it  is  in  its 
essence,  cannot  be  described  .  .  . 

413.  Because  from  living  experience,  I  can  know  it, 
but  never  describe  it. 

J.  27s.  Hence  it  is  that  the  Spiritual  World  cannot 
be  described  ...     D.  1086. 

e.  There   are   very   few   things  there  which  are 

described. 

W.  2023.  These  distinctions  cannot  be  expressed  in 
natural  language,  thus  not  described  .  .  .  They  can  only 
be  expressed  and  described  by  the  Angels  themselves, 
by  means  of  their  own  languages,  words,  and  writings. 

D.  218.  According  to  their  description  .  .  . 

E.  8508.  'Jehovah  shall  count  in  describing  the 
peoples'  (Ps.lxxxvii.6). 

De  Verbo  38.  How  the  spiritual  operate  cannot  be 
described  before  the  Natural ;  and  how  the  celestial 
operate  cannot  be  described  before  the  Spiritual. 

u.  Nor  can  these  things  be   described,   except 

imperfectly  .  .  . 


Desert.     See  Wilderness. 

Desert.     Deserere. 
Desertion.    Desertio. 

M.  468.  Malicious  desertion  (a  cause  of  divorce). 


D.  5663a.  This  Mohammed  .  .  .  was  entirely  deserted. 

E.  555s.  '  A  woman  forsaken,  and  afflicted  in  spirit' 
(Is.liv.6)  =  the  Church  which  is  not  in  truths,  but  is  still 
in  the  affection  or  longing  for  them.  'A  woman'  =  the 
Church,  which  is  said  to  be  'forsaken'  when  not  in 
truths.  .  .  That  it  is  to  be  established  by  the  Lord,  and 
delivered  from  spiritual  captivity,  is  meant  by,  'For  a 
small  moment  have  I  forsaken  thee,  but  with  great  com- 
passions will  I  gather  thee  together  again'  (ver.7). 

6178.  The  desertion  and  vastation  of  the  Church  is 
meant  tby  'the  land  being  deserted  and  loathed'  (Is. 
vii.  16). 

65436.  That  all  the  truths  of  the  Church  are  driven 
away,  is  signified  by  '.  .  .  they  have  left  him'  (Ezek. 
xxxi.  12). 

60.   'Thou  hast  forsaken   Jehovah'   (Jer.ii.i7)  = 

aversion  to  being  reformed  by  the  Lord. 

Designate.     Designare. 
A.  i884e.  To  the  designated  place.     H.44ie.  D.2336. 

E.  3749.   'The  appointed  barley'  (Is.xxviii.25). 
413.  The  man  is  then  at  once  designated  either  to 
Heaven  or  to  Hell. 

Designer.     See  Contrive. 

Design.     See  under  Counsel. 

Designs.      Technica. 

M.  766.  Many  designs  upon  the  walls. 

Desirable.    Appetibilis. 

A.  207.   'Desirable  to  the  eyes'  (Gen. hi. 6)  =  phantasy. 

209.  'Desirable  to  the  eyes,  desirahle-desiderabilis-to 
give  intelligence  '  =  such  things  as  were  applicable  to 
their  nature  ...  In  special,  they  regard  the  will. 

Desire.     Ciipire,  Cupido. 

See  Cupidity. 

A.  815.  They  desire  to  destroy  the  soul  also. 

.  They  are  kept  in  the  desire  of  revenge  .  .  . 

951.  They  are  kept  in  the  strongest  desire  of  ascend- 
ing into  Heaven  .  .  .  Their  desire  is  increased,  and  is 
more  and  more  turned  into  anxiety  .  .  . 

957.  From  innate  desire  they  regard  all  things  with 
longing. 

963.  When  the  desire  of  breaking  out  thence  is 
kindled  .  .  . 

1 188.  From  the  predominant  desire  of  innovating  .  .  . 

1472.  Originates  from  the  desire  which  is  of  the 
external  man. 

i48oe.  Appetite  and  taste  correspond  to  the  desire  for 
knowledges. 

191 7.  Diabolical  Spirits  desire  nothing  more  than  .  .  . 


Desire-  Cupire. 


122 


Desire 


[A.]  403S2.  The  delight,  pleasure,  and  desire-cupidum- 
there,  belong  to  the  will,  and  are  called  natural  goods. 

4049.  They  constantly  had  the  desire  and  longing  to 
come  into  Heaven.  Such  are  they  who  relate  to  the 
ventricles  of  the  brain  .  .  .  This  endeavour  (of  the 
lymph)  corresponds  to  this  desire  and  longing. 

50062.  They  frequented  places  of  worship,  not  from 
any  longing  to  know  the  things  of  Heaven,  but  from 
another  desire  drawn  from  the  time  of  early  childhood. 

648 12.  The  evil  want  to  be  eminent,  to  be  enriched, 
and  therefore  to  seem  upright  and  zealous,  and  from  this 
desire,  as  from  a  fire,  are  excited  to  do  such  things  more 
than  the  upright. 

64952.  As  the  man  who  is  in  this  state  desires  nothing 
but  evils  .  .  .  lest  he  should  act  as  he  desires  ...  he  is 
kept  in  bonds  .  .  . 

754ie.  The  desire  always  remaining. 

89063.  '  The  fire  which  burns  before  Him '  =  the  desire 
of  evil ;  'the  flame  which  burns  after  Him '  =  the  desire 
of  falsity  thence. 

H.  283.  They  are  kindled  with  a  cruel  desire  of 
injuring. 

343.  Such  a  desire  is  innate  to  Spirits. 

4003.  They  desired  the  communication  (of  heavenly 
joy)  to  themselves,  which  was  done  ;  for  what  a  Spirit 
who  is  not  yet  in  Heaven  or  Hell  desires,  is  granted  to 
him,  if  it  is  advantageous  .  .  . 

N.  33.   For  will  they  have  desire.     M.291. 

W.  363s.  There  are  many  things  of  love,  to  which 
other  names  have  been  allotted,  because  they  are  deriva- 
tions ;  as  affections,  desires,  appetites,  and  their  plea- 
sures and  delights. 

P.  96*.  Natural  affection,  which  in  itself  is  desire  .  .  . 
is  what  alone  leads  and  moves  beasts  .  .  . 

1 83s.  This  desire  lies  inmostly  concealed  in  hereditary 
evil .  .  . 

199.  Except  some  desire -cupidum- connected  with 
the  body. 

R.  133.  They  are  in  the  lust  of  the  adultery  of  a  son 
with  his  mother. 

M.  454.  As  it  verges  towards  the  desire  of  varieties, 
and  to  the  desire  of  defloration. 

T.  459.  The  desire  seized  me  .  .  . 


D.  780.  They  still  inwardly  desired  honour  in  the 
world  .  .  .  which  desire  it  was  granted  me  to  perceive 
.  .  .  That  which  is  heavenly  desires  nothing  of  the 
kind  .  .  . 

817.  Spirits  desire,  and  induce  their  cupidity  on  man. 
Examp. 

3394.  There  is  still  resistance  from  his  desire  of  glory 
in  life,  which  was  such  as  almost  to  surpass  the  desires 
of  all  others. 

3529.  That  Spirits  .  .  .  perceive  what  man  desires. 

5967.  They  had  no  affection  for  truth,  justice  and 
right,  except  from  their  own  proper  desire,  which  desire 
not  only  excited  them,  but  also  enlightened  them  ;  for 
such  can  enlighten  their  cupidity  in  civil  things  .  .  . 


E.  551.  'They  desire  to  die'  (Rev.ix.6)  =  that  they 
want  to  destroy  the  faculty  of  perceiving  good. 

556s.   'From  him  that  would  borrow  of  thee'  (Matt. 

v.42). 

J.  (Post.)  19.  They  inspire  into  them  the  desire  of 
going  out  .  .  . 

Desire.     Desiderare,  Desiderium. 
Desirable.     Desiderabilis. 

A.  85s.  'So  that  thou  doest  not  thy  desire  in  the  day 
of  My  holiness  .  .  .  nor  findest  thy  desire'  (Is.lviii.  13) 
.  .  .  The  celestial  man  is  such  that  he  does  not  act  from 
his  own  desire,  but  from  what  is  well-pleasing  to  the 
Lord,  which  is  his  desire. 

102.  'A  tree  desirable  in  aspect'  (Gen. ii. 9)  =  the  per- 
ception of  truth. 

207.  'Desirable  to  give  intelligence'  (Gen.iii.6)  = 
pleasure.     209. 

273e.   'The  fields  of  desire'  (Is.xxxii.12). 

314.  The  Spiritual  Angels  .  .  .  perform  for  him  every 
office  which  he  can  desire  in  that  state.     H.4502. 

361.  'To  thee  is  his  desire,  and  thou  shalt  rule  over 
him'  (Gen.iv.7)  =  that  charity  wants  to  be  with  faith  .  .  . 
365. 

543.   Some  longed  to  know  what  heavenly  joy  is  .  .  . 

11974.  'Ye  have  carried  into  your  temples  My  desir- 
able things'  (Joel  iii.5)=the  Knowledges  of  these  things. 

1392.  They  desire  nothing  more  than  to  transfer 
their  own  happiness  into  others. 

19042.  As  the  Intellectual  desired  the  Rational,  as 
offspring,  and  as  it  is  the  part  of  the  desire  or  affection 
which  is  speaking  .  .  . 

19256.  'The  Angel  of  the  covenant,  whom  ye  have 
desired'  (Mal.iii.  1). 

19494.  '  He  shall  spoil  the  treasure  of  all  the  vessels 
of  desire'  (Hos.xiii.  15). 

1982.  Certain  Souls  .  .  .  who  longed  to  see  the  glory 
of  the  Lord  .  .  . 

21 19.  As  everyone's  desires  follow  him  .  .  . 

3537.  'Garments  of  desires'  (Gen. xxvii.  I5)  =  genuine 
truths.  .  .  'Of  desires '  =  genuine. 

35706.  To  appetite  and  relish  correspond  the  desire 
and  affection  of  knowing  truth. 

.  The  soul,  which  is  the  good  of  the  Rational, 

gives  to  desire  and  to  be  affected  with  them  ;  thus  the 
things  which  are  of  knowledge  and  doctrine  it  introduces 
by  means  of  the  delight  which  is  of  desire,  and  the  good 
which  is  of  affection. 

3589.  Desirable  and  delectable  things  for  the  Divine 
Rational.  Sig. 

.    ' Dainties '  =  the  delights  which  are  of  good  and 

the  pleasantnesses  which  are  of  truth ;  the  delights 
which  are  of  good  are  desirable  things,  and  the  pleasant- 
nesses which  are  of  truth  are  delectable  ones  ;  for  the 
affection  of  good  is  what  desires,  and  then  the  affection 
of  truth  is  what  delectates. 

3928.  When  he  desires  the  things  of  Heaven  .  .  . 

3944.  The  longing  for  interior  truth.  Sig. 


Desire 


123 


Desire 


3945.  The  affection  and  longing  for  the  things  which 
are  of  marriage  love.  Sig. 

3946.  That  there  is  conjugial  longing.  Sig. 

3950.  Longing  on  the  part  of  the  affection  of  external 
truth  .  .  .  that  it  may  be  conjoined.  Sig. 

40 1 72.  'Thirst'  =  appetite  and  longing,  thus  the  affec- 
tion of  knowing  and  imbibing  truth  .  .  .  '  Hunger '  = 
the  appetite,  the  longing,  thus  the  affection  of  imbuing 
good. 

4049.  They  had  a  constant  desire-cwpido-and  longing 
to  come  into  Heaven. 

e.  This  endeavour  (on  the  part  of  the  lymph) 

corresponds  to  this  desire  and  longing. 

41 362.  Man  has  no  desire  to  have  Knowledges  of  this. 

4145.  'Because  desiring  thou  hast  desired  to  the 
house  of  thy  father'  (Gen.  xxxi.  30)  =  the  desire  of  con- 
junction with  the  Divine  good  which  flows  in  directly. 

4449.  'His  soul  longeth  for  your  daughter'  (Gen. 
xxxiv.8)  =  a  longing  for  conjunction  with  this  new 
Church. 

4976s.  Good  has  an  appetite  and  longs  for  truth. 

5056.  From  intense  longing  he  importuned  to  be 
admitted  into  Heaven  .  .  . 

2.   In  such  a  substance  there  is  the  endeavour  and 

as  it  were  the  longing  to  perform  use. 

e.  Thus  was  represented  the  nature  of  the  desires 

of  those  who  are  in  the  province  of  the  seminal  vessels. 

51473.  These  goods  in  act  .  .  .  serve  for  their  recrea- 
tion ;  for  they  are  their  desires  ;  and  it  is  known  that 
when  desires  are  obtained  in  act,  they  are  for  recreation 
and  life. 

5202e.  Affects  those  who,  from  good,  are  in  the  desire 
of  knowing  truths  from  the  Word. 

52152.  Spiritual  heat  .  .  .  gives  to  desire,  to  love,  also 
to  be  affected  ;  therefore  desires,  loves,  and  affections 
are  spiritual  heats  .  .  .  When  the  desires  and  affections, 
that  is,  the  loves,  increase,  the  body  grows  warm  in  the 
same  degree. 

5365s.  Good  longs  for  truth,  and  truth  for  good  ;  and 
according  to  the  longing  and  its  quality,  they  are  con- 
joined together.     83134.  87722. 

.  With  affection,  longing,  delight,  or  a  holy  sigh. 

55762.  The  Angels  continually  long  for  those  things 
which  are  of  intelligence  and  wisdom. 

3.  He  who  is  in  the  desire  of  imbuing  his  dispo- 
sition with  such  things  as  are  of  knowledge,  intelligence 
and  wisdom,  begins  to  be  in  sorrow  and  suffering  when 
he  is  withheld  from  such  things,  and,  like  one  who  is  in 
famine,  begins  to  long  to  return  to  his  spiritual  food. 

5579e.  They  come  into  this  (state  of  evening)  ...  in 
order  that  they  may  have  an  appetite  and  long  for  truths 
and  goods  .  .  . 

5623s.  This  comes  from  the  pleasure  and  thence  the 
desire.  They  who  are  in  good,  feel  pleasure  in  perfect- 
ing good  by  means  of  truths  .  .  .  wherefore  they  long  for 
truths ;  but  they  who  are  in  evil,  have  pleasure  in  evil 
and  in  confirming  this  by  means  of  falsities,  wherefore 
they  long  for  falsities  ;  and  as  they  long  for  falsities 
they  are  averse  to  truths. 


5977.  Genii  .  .  .  scent  in  a  moment  what  man  desires 
.  .  .  They  were  permitted  to  act  into  my  desires  .  .  . 
and  unless  the  Lord  had  guarded  me  by  means  of  Angels, 
they  would  have  perverted  them  into  concupiscences  of 
evil  .  .  . 

6078.  'Pasture' =  what  supports  the  spiritual  life, 
which  is  chiefly  scientific  truth  ;  this  the  soul  of  man 
longs  for,  as  the  body  for  food.  .  .  That  scientifics  and 
truths  support  the  soul,  is  evident  from  the  desires  of 
knowing  with  man. 

.  Good  Spirits  and  Angels  are  in  the  continual 

desire  of  knowing  and  of  being  wise  .  .  .  nor  are  they 
recreated,  and  elevated  into  the  blessedness  of  their  life, 
until  their  desires  are  satisfied. 

6178.  Longing.  Sig. 

e.  This  is  a  formula  by  which  the  affection,  thus 

the  longing  of  the  will  is  expressed. 

622 12.  The  man  who,  when  he  lives  in  the  body,  longs 
for  Heaven  .  .  . 

6222s.  This  enlightenment  falls  only  into  such  as  long 
to  know  truths  .  .  .  for  the  sake  of  life  and  use. 

6388.  They  are  in  their  delight  and  blessedness  when 
they  are  doing  good  to  the  neighbour,  for  they  long  for 
nothing  more. 

6435.  'Even  to  the  desire  of  the  hills  of  an  age '  (Gen. 
xlix.26)  =  to  mutual  celestial  love. 

701 7e.  (The  origin  of  desires. ) 

7666.  That  in  the  desire  there  is  not  good.  Sig. 

.  As  '  faces '  =  affections,  they  also  —  desires. 

8368s.  If  he  desires  truth  from  affection,  he  has 
pleasantness. 

8495s.  The  proprium  from  which  the  Angels  do  not 
act,  is  signified  by  .  .  .  their  'not  finding  their  own 
desire,'  etc. 

8562.  He  who  is  in  spiritual  life,  desires  his  support 
from  such  things  as  are  called  heavenly  meats  and 
drinks. 

2.  When  man  is  gifted  with  good  by  the  Lord,  he 

comes  into  the  desire  for  truth,  and  this  desire  is  kindled 
according  to  the  lack  of  it. 

e.  Temptation  attacks  that  which  man  loves  and 

desires. 

8564.  The  ardent  longing  for  truth.  Sig. 

8568.   Increase  of  the  longing  for  truth.  Sig. 

.   'To  thirst'  =  to  have  an   appetite  for  and   to 

desire,  namely,  truth. 

.  The  desire  of  knowing  truth  is  here  described 

by  'to  thirst ;'  the  desire  for  truth  is  signified  by  'I  will 
not  send  thirst  for  waters,  but  for  hearing  the  words  of 
Jehovah.' 

8847.  From  an  intense  longing  he  importuned  to  be 
admitted  into  Heaven. 

2.  As  it  were  a  blazing  longing  to  put  itself 

off.  .  . 

e.   By  this   was  represented   the   nature   of  the 

longings  of  those  who  are  in  province  to  which  the 
seminal  vesicles  correspond. 

8869s.  Of  this  it  is  said  that  'their  most  desirable 
things  shall  not  profit'  (Is.xliv.9).     E.5877,Ex. 


Desire 


124 


Desire 


[A.]  8910.  That  which  an  evil  love  breathes  is  called 
concupiscence  ;  but  that  which  a  good  love  breathes  is 
called  longing  .  .  .  Concupiscence  belongs  to  both  the 
will  and  the  understanding,  but  is  properly  of  the  will 
in  the  understanding. 

9104.  Conjunction  is  effected  by  means  of  the  state  of 
desire  of  speaking  with  another  ;  hence,  in  the  other 
life  they  come  together  .  .  .  when  they  desire  it. 

91827.  The  Lord's  'mercy'  is  predicated  towards  those 
who  are  in  the  deficiency  and  yet  in  the  desire  of  good  ; 
and  his  'compassions'  towards  those  who  are  in  ignor- 
ance and  yet  in  the  desire  of  truth. 

9198.  'Any  widow' =  those  who  are  in  good  without 
truth,  and  still  long  for  truth.     .  9206. 

.    'An  orphan'  in  the  celestial  sense,  =those  who 

are  in  good  and  long  for  truth.     9207. 

92062.  They  who  are  in  good  and  do  not  long  for 
truth  are  not  in  good  .  .  .  Hence  good  is  Known  from 
the  fact  that  it  longs  for  truth  .  .  .  The  longing  itself, 
that  is,  the  affection  itself  of  truth  for  the  sake  of  life, 
regarded  in  itself,  is  the  affection  of  conjunction  ;  the 
case  with  this  is  as  with  food  or  bread,  which  long  for 
water  or  wine. 

9207.  '  Orphans '  =  those  who  are  in  truth  and  not  yet 
in  good,  yet  long  for  good  ;  here,  those  who  are  in  truth 
but  do  not  long  for  good  .  .  .  That  truths  perish  with 
those  who  do  not  long  for  good  .  .  . 

.  The  truths  which  are  conjoined  with  good,  in 

themselves  always  have  the  desire  of  doing  good,  and 
are  at  the  same  time  thereby  more  closely  conjoined 
with  good  ;  or,  what  is  the  same,  they  who  are  in  truths 
always  long  to  do  good,  and  thus  conjoin  it  with  their 
truths  ;  wherefore,  they  who  believe  themselves  to  be 
in  truths,  and  do  not  ong  to  do  good,  are  not  in 
truths  .  .  . 

2.   'The   salt   of    the   earth' =  the   truth    of  the 

Church  which  longs  for  good;  'the  infatuated  salt'  = 
truth  without  the  longing  for  good  ...  To  long  for 
good  is  to  long  to  do  what  is  good,  and  thus  to  be 
conjoined  with  good. 

3.   'To  be  salted  with  fire' =  the  longing  of  good 

for  truth  ;  and  'to  be  salted  with  salt'=the  longing  of 
truth  for  good;  'salt  without  savour '=  truth  without 
the  longing  for  good;  'to  have  salt  in  themselves'  = 
that  longing. 

4.  ' Salt '  =  truth  longing  for  good  ;  and  'infatu- 
ated salt  '  =  the  truth  which  is  without  the  longing  for 
good. 

5.  That  'in  every  offering  there  was  to  be  salt'  = 

that  there  was  to  be  in  all  worship  the  longing  of  truth 
for  good,  and  of  good  for  truth. 

.    '  Salt '  =  the  longing  for  conjunction. 

6.  "When  the  one  longs  to  be  reciprocally  con- 
joined with  the  other,  that  is,  good  with  truth  and  truth 
with  good,  they  mutually  regard  each  other. 

7.  The  reason  '  salt '  =  the  longing  for  truth.  Ex. 

9209.  The  instruction  of  those  who  are  in  ignorance 
of  truth,  and  still  are  in  the  longing  to  learn.   Sig. 

.    'The  needy '  =  those  who  are  in   ignorance  of 

truth,  and  still  are  in  the  longing  to  learn. 

9269.  Their  longing  and  life.  Sig. 


.    'Soul,'  when  predicated  of  those  who  long  to  be 

instructed  in  the  truths  of  faith,  who  are  signified  by 
'sojourners,' =  longing  and  life;  for  ' soul'  =  life  from 
faith  ;  and  longing  is  the  activity  itself  of  life ;  for  it 
is  from  the  affection  of  good,  and  the  truth  of  faith 
lives  from  the  affection  of  good. 

9325°.  ' Salt '  =  the  longing  of  truth  for  good;  'the 
going  forth  of- the  waters '  =  the  Natural  of  man  which 
receives  the  Knowledges  of  truth  and  good,  and  which 
is  amended  by  means  of  the  longing  of  truth  for  good 
.  .  .  This  amendment  takes  place,  when,  from  such  a 
longing,  the  Natural  of  man  receives  truths  from  the 
Word. 

102902.  This  (enlightenment)  takes  place  according  to 
the  quality  of  the  longing  for  truth  with  man  ;  and  the 
longing  for  truth  with  him  is  according  to  his  love. 

10300.  '  Salted'  =  the  longing  of  truth  for  good  ;  (for) 
'  salt '  =  the  longing  which  is  of  the  love  of  truth  for 
good.  .  .  The  reason  there  ought  to  be  the  longing  of 
truth  for  good,  is  that  this  longing  is  conjunctive  of 
both ;  for  in  proportion  as  truth  longs  for  good,  it  is 
conjoined  with  it.  .  .  Wherefore,  when  there  is  the 
longing  for  this  conjunction  in  Divine  worship  and  in 
each  and  all  things  of  it,  there  is  Heaven  in  each  and 
all  things  therein.  Sig. 

2.  When  it  is  known  that   '  salt '=  the  longing 

for  the  conjunction  of  truth  and  good,  it  may  be  known 
that.  .  .  'everything  must  be  salted  with  fire'  —  that 
everyone  must  long  from  genuine  love  ;  '  every  sacrifice 
must  be  salted  with  salt'  =  that  the  longing  from 
genuine  love  must  be  in  all  worship;  'salt  without 
savour '  =  a  longing  from  some  other  than  a  genuine 
love  ;  and  'to  have  salt  in  themselves '  =  the  longing  of 
truth  for  good. 

3.    'Infatuated  salt' =  a  longing  from  proprium, 

thus  from  the  love  of  self  and  the  world  ;  such  a  long- 
ing is  'the  infatuated  salt,  not  fit  for  anything.' 

4.   That  in  all  worship  there  must  be  the  longing 

of  truth  for  good.  Sig. 

.  Longing  is  the  very  ardour  itself  of  love,  thus 

its  Continuous,  and  love  is  spiritual  conjunction. 

5.  As  the  longing  of  truth  for  good  conjoins,  so 

the  longing  of  falsity  for  evil  disjoins,  and  that  which 
disjoins  also  destroys.   Sig. 

10362.  'To  find  his  desire'  (Is.lviii.i3)  =  to  live 
according  to  the  delights  of  their  loves. 

H.7ie.  Wherefore  the  Angels  long  for  nothing  more, 
than  that  new  Angel  guests  may  come  to  them. 

194.  It  is  for  this  reason  that  in  the  Spiritual  World 
one  is  made  present  with  another,  provided  he  longs 
intensely  for  his  presence. 

195.  When  anyone  is  going  from  one  place  to  another 
...  he  comes  there  more  quickly  when  he  longs,  and 
more  tardily  when  he  does  not  long ;  the  very  way 
itself  is  lengthened  and  shortened  according  to  the 
longing,  although  it  is  the  same.     W.  74. 

274.  As  wisdom  perfects  the  Angels  ...  all  there 
long  for  it  .  .  . 

279.  He  longs  and  has  an  appetite  for  these  things 
solely  because  it  is  truth  and  because  it  is  good. 


Desire 


125 


Desire 


332.  Each  has  as  many  little  children  as  she  yearns 
for  from  spiritual  storge. 

349.  It  is  there  increased  .  .  .  but  within  the  degree 
of  the  affection  and  Jonging  for  truth  and  its  good, 
and  not  beyond  it ;  they  who  have  had  but  little 
affection  and  longing  receive  little  .  .  .  but  they  who 
have  had  much  affection  and  longing  receive  much  ;  the 
degree  itself  of  affection  and  longing  is  as  the  measure 
.  .  .  The  reason  is,  that  the  love,  to  which  belong  the 
affection  and  the  longing,  receives  all  that  agrees  with 
itself.  Sig. 

352s.  They  long  for  truth,  and,  from  the  longing, 
seek  it  .  .  . 

365.  'The  poor '  =  those  with  whom  these  Knowledges 
are  deficient,  and  yet  they  long  for  them.     420. 

.   'The  poor  man  who  .  .  .  desired  to  be  filled 

with  the  crumbs  .  .  . '  (Luke  xvi. )  =  the  gentiles,  who 
had  not  the  Knowledges  of  good  and  truth,  and  yet 
longed  for  them. 

393.  They  are  in  ecclesiastical,  things  in  Heaven  who 
in  the  world  had  loved  the  Word,  and  from  longing 
had  sought  for  the  truths  therein  .  .  .  for  the  sake  of 
the  use  of  life  ;  these,  according  to  the  love  and  longing 
for  use  there,  are  in  enlightenment  and  in  the  light  of 
•wisdom  .  .  . 

2.  Iu  proportion  as  these,  from  the  longing  of 

love,  investigated  the  laws  of  what  is  just .  .  .  they  are 
in  the  capacity  of  administering  offices  in  Heaven  .  .  . 

4003.  When  such  have  longed  to  know  what  heavenly 
joy  is  .  .  .     409e. 

427.  All  in  that  World  meet,  and  converse  together, 
when  they  long  to  do  so  .  .  . 

4502.  The  Angels  .  .  .  loDg  for  nothing  more  than  to 
perform  offices,  to  instruct,  and  to  convey  into  Heaven. 

479.  There  is  constantly  .  .  .  the  affection  of  the  long- 
ing to  return  to  his  like,  thus  to  his  reigning  love. 

5.  This  conversation  the  good  who  were  present 

heard  with  longing. 

495.  They  then  come  into  the  longing  to  know  what 
Heaven  is  like  .  .  . 

525.  They  are  told  .  .  .  that  they  can  be  admitted 
(into  Heaven)  if  they  long  for  it  .  .  . 

N.  1216.  Good  is  in  the  perpetual  longing  and  thence 
endeavour  to  conjoin  itself  with  truths.  Eefs. 

J.  32.  He  then  goes  hither  and  thither,  wherever  the 
longings  of  his  disposition  carry  him. 

W.  267.  The  natural  man  can  elevate  his  understand- 
ing ...  to  what  extent  he  desires. 

P.  179.  The  desire  of  foreknowing  future  things  is 
connate  with  very  many,  but  this  desire  derives  its 
origin  from  the  love  of  evil. 

32 13.  A  few  who  from  the  heart  long  for  this  influx, 
sometimes  receive  some  answer  .  .  . 

326s.  Presence  there  is  from  the  recollection  of  another 
with  the  longing  to  see  him. 

R.  782.  'The  fruits  of  the  desire  of  the  soul'  (Rev. 
xviii.  14)  =  the  blessednesses  and  happinesses  of  Heaven. 
.  .  .  These  are  the  desires  of  men  when  they  are  dying, 


and  are  also  their  desires  when  they  newly  arrive  in  the 
Spiritual  World. 

955.  'The  spirit  and  the  bride  say,  Come' =  that 
Heaven  and  the  Church  long  for  the  Advent  of  the  Lord. 

e.  These  long  for  the  light  .  .  . 

M.  37.  It  follows,  that  the  onelongs  for  and  breathes 
conjunction  with  the  other.  Regarded  in  itself,  love  is 
nothing  but  a  longing  and  thence  an  effort  for  conjunc- 
tion, and  marriage  love,  for  conjunction  into  one. 

-e.  As  this  capacity  and  longing  for  conjunction 

into  one  is  in  every  single  thing  .  .  . 

180.  The  states  of  this  love  are  ...  a  mutual  longing 
of  the  disposition  and  the  heart  to  do  everything  good 
to  the  other.   Gen.  art. 

e.  This  mutual  longing  ...  is  of  the  body  from 

these  things. 

228.  Especially  by  accommodations  to  desires  .  .  . 

229.  For  those  who  long  for  love  truly  conjugial,  the 
Lord  provides  similitudes  .  .  . 

T.  439.  They  immerse  the  interior  desires  of  their 
mind  in  their  proprium. 

61 12.  New  desires  which  are  of  good  and  truth  in 
place  of  cupidities  .  .  . 

Ad.  949.  The  very  desires  themselves  are  continua- 
tions of  such  loves  ;  also  cupidities,  which  are  desires 
in  the  natural  mind,  from  which  this  mind  is  called  the 
disposition. 

D.  1568.  Appetite  is  said  of  the  body;  to  desire- 
cupere,  or  cupidity,  is  of  the  disposition  ;  to  long,  or 
longing,  is  of  the  interior  or  rational  mind  .  .  . 

2037.  Whatever  it  was  given  him  to  long  for  in 
thought,  they  gave  him  .  .  . 

2044.  They  would  then  have  all  that  they  had  ever 
desired  .  .  .  for  it  is  given  by  the  Lord  to  desire  those 
things  which  are  suitable. 

D.  Min.  4732.  He  then  began  to  long  ...  to  come 
into  Heaven.  It  was  said  to  him  that  if  he  longed  for 
this,  it  is  permitted ;  for  whatever  anyone  longs  for  is 
granted  ;  and  that  all  consociation  is  according  to  the 
affections,  thus  according  to  the  desires,  for  these  are 
affections.  .  .  He  said  that  he  longed  to  be  loosed  from 
the  Society  in  which  he  was  .  .  .  Then  he  was  loosed, 
according  to  his  desire  ...  He  said  that  lie  longed  for 
a  good  Society  .  .  .  this  also  was  conceded  .  .  .  but  he 
could  not  remain  there  .  .  .  Hence  it  may  be  evident 
.  .  .  that  a  Society  is  allotted  according  to  the  desires  of 
a  man's  life  which  he  has  acquired  in  the  world  .  .  . 

E.  63.  'Ye  shall  desire  to  see  one  of  the  days  of  the 
Son  of  Man'  (Lukexvii.22). 

117.  'Affliction  '  =  anxiety  from  a  longing  to  Know 
truths  .  .  .  The  reason  is,  that  they  are  conjoined  with 
the  Angels  of  Heaven,  and  these  continually  long  for 
truths,  because  they  long  for  intelligence  and  wisdom  ; 
they  long  for  these  as  a  starving  man  does  for  food  .  .  . 
This  longing  is  also  in  man  from  early  childhood, 
because  he  is  then  conjoined  with  Heaven,  and  this  long- 
ing comes  from  Heaven  ;  but  it  perishes  with  those  who 
turn  themselves  to  the  world. 

e.  Such  are  they  who  are  only  in  natural  affec- 
tion and  thence  longing. 


Desist 


126 


Desist 


[E.]  24212.  Desirable  things  of  goods'  (Joel  iii.5)  =  the 
derived  truths  and  goods,  which  are  Knowledges  from 
the  sense  of  the  letter. 

357s4.  'Desirable  things  of  the  eyes'  (Lara. ii. 4)  =  all 
things  which  are  of  intelligence  and  wisdom. 

38618.  'To  vivify  in  famine '  =  to  give  spiritual  life  ac- 
cording to  the  desire  ;  the  desire  for  the  Knowledges  of 
truth  and  good  is  the  spiritual  affection  of  truth  .  .  . 

39111.  'My  soul  longeth  .  .  .  towards  the  courts  of 
Jehovah'  (Ps.lxxxiv.2).     10S24. 

40513.   'God  desireth  to  dwell  in  it'  (Ps.lxviii.  16). 

439s.  'He  scattereth  the  peoples,  they  long  for  wars' 
(Ps.lxviii. 30)  =  the  subjugation  of  the  Hells. 

50425.  'All  our  desirable  things  are  become  a  waste' 
(Is.lxiv.  11).  .  .  'Desirable  things,'  in  the  Word,  =  the 
truths  of  the  Church. 

61914.  'More  desirable  are  they  than  gold'  (Ps.xix.io). 
'  What  is  desirable '  =  that  which  is  of  affection  and 
of  love. 

6247.  'Many  just  ones  and  prophets  have  desired  to 
see  what  ye  have  seen'  (Matt.xiii.  17). 

62713.  'To  long  for  wars '— ratiocinations  against 
truths. 

654s6.  Occurs.     78 116. 

71712.  'Thyservantshavedesiredherstones'(Ps.cii.  14). 

739s.  'Desirable  in  aspect'  (Gen. ii. 9)  =  that  which  the 
understanding  desired. 

7419.  'The  desires  of  your  father  ye  will  do'  (John 
viii.  44)  =  that  they  wanted  to  be  in  the  evils  of  their 
cupidities. 

78ilfi.  'Woe  to  those  who  desire  the  day  of  Jehovah' 
(Amos  v.  18).  As  they  believed  that  He  would  deliver 
them  from  their  earthly  enemies,  and  carry  them  into 
glory  .  .  .  they  desired  Him  .  .  . 

7909.  The  goods  which  are  in  the  natural  mind  from 
the  spiritual,  are  called  affections  and  desires  for  these 
things. 

79917.  'Desirable  things,'  in  the  Word,  are  said  of 
truths. 

8508.  'He  hath  desired  it  .  .  .  Here  will  I  dwell, 
because  I  have  desired  it'  (Ps.cxxxii.13). 

9185.   'My  soul  desired  the  earliest'  (Micah  vii.  1).  Ex. 

946s.   'They  desire  the  approach  of  God'  (Is.lviii.2). 

10824.  'My  flesh  longeth  for  Thee'  (Ps.lxiii.  i)  =  nian 
as  to  the  good  of  the  will. 

1 158.  'The  fruits  of  the  desire  of  the  soul  '  =  the  glad- 
nesses and  joys  which  have  been  awaited  from  worship 
and  life  according  to  the  traditions  of  the  Babylonish 
religion. 

Desist.     Desistere. 

See  under  Evil. 

A.  95 7e.  They  are  so  delighted  to  punish,  that  they 
do  not  want  to  desist,  even  if  it  were  to  eternity. 

6203e.  Afterwards,  he  is  not  able  to  desist  from  these 
evils.     P.1123. 


70322.  They  never  desist,  except  through  grievous 
punishments  .  .  . 

7295s.  This  sign  signifies  the  first  admonition  with 
those  who  are  infesting,  that  they  should  desist. 

87003.  It  is  impossible  for  man  to  be  saved,  unless  he 
who  is  in  evil  is  allowed  to  do  evil  and  to  desist  from 
evil  :  when  he  desists  from  evil  of  himself  in  this 
freedom,  the  affection  of  good  and  truth  is  insinuated 
by  the  Lord  .  .  . 

8880.  All  good  flows  in  from  the  Lord,  and  they  love 
who  desist  from  evil  .  .  . 

888 ie.  This  is  effected  by  the  Lord  when  man  desists 
from  evils. 

9009.  The  man  sees  that  they  are]  evils,  and  therefore 
is  able  to  desist  from  them,  but  will  not,  and  therefore 
confirms  them  with  himself  .  .  . 

90 1 43.  Sins  are  not  remitted,  unless  the  man  .  .  .  desists 
from  evils  .  .  . 

9296s.  This  influx  is  so  far  operative  with  man  in  pro- 
portion as  he  desists  from  evils  .  .  . 

9378s.  This  (conjunction  with  the  Lord)  takes  place 
when  man  desists  from  evils  ;  for  to  desist  from  evils  is 
left  to  the  determination  or  freedom  of  man  .  .  .    10067s. 

93993.  Every  man  ...  is  in  the  capacity  of  under- 
standing Divine  truth,  and  thence  in  the  capacity  of 
receiving,  in  proportion  as  he  desists  from  evils. 

9937s.  The  Lord  removes  the  Hells,  in  proportion  as 
man  desists  from  evils. 

101433.  Purification  from  evils  and  falsities  is  to  desist 
from  them  .  .  . 

P.  1452.  When  he  desists  the  door  is  opened,  and 
then  the  concupiscences  of  evil  are  cast  out  by  the 
Lord  .  .  . 

146.  When  the  man  desists  (from  these  evils),  there 
arises  a  combat  of  the  internal  man  with  the  external. 

151.  When  man  goes  further,  and  wills  to  desist  from 
evils,  he  is  in  the  second  step  of  reformation,  and  is  then 
out  of  Hell,  but  not  yet  in  Heaven  .  .  . 

2964.  A  thief  feels  such  delight  in  thefts  that  he 
cannot  desist  .  .  . 

T.  732.  God  cannot  remit  sins  according  to  His  laws, 
except  in  proportion  as  man  desists  from  them  according 
to  His  laws. 

4615.  Man  is  an  organ  recipient  of  life  from  God,  con- 
sequently is  a  recipient  of  good,  in  proportion  as  he 
desists  from  evil :  the  ability  to  desist  from  evil  the 
Lord  gives  to  every  man  .  .  . 

535.  They  also  perform  repentance,  who  do  not 
examine  themselves,  but  still  desist  from  evils  because 
they  are  sins.  Gen.  art. 

5392.  Sins  are  .  .  .  removed  as  man  afterwards  desists 
from  them,  and  enters  on  a  new  life. 


D.  153.  Evil  Spirits  never  desist  .  .  . 
644.  They  were  warned  by  others  to  desist,  but  con- 
fessed that  they  were  not  able  .  .  . 
662.  See  Able  at  these  refs.     4020. 
795.  Their  nature  is  such  that  they  can  never  desist . .  . 


Desk 


127 


Desolate 


2872.  That  evil  Spirits  cannot  desist  from  attacking 
the  good. 

4091.  He  said  that  he  could  never  desist  .  .  . 

4742.  They  never  desist  from  a  purpose  once  taken  .  .  . 

5897.  That  a  Spirit  cannot  desist  from  doing  what  his 
love  leads. 

6054.  If  he  is  not  able  to  desist  .  .  . 

E.  803.  III.  When  a  man  begins  to  think  .  .  .  that 
he  should  desist  from  doing  evils,  because  they  are  sins 
.  .  .  But  in  order  to  desist  from  them  ...  he  must  sup- 
plicate the  Lord  for  aid.  The  sins  from  which  he  must 
desist.  Enum. 

9362.  In  proportion  as  a  man  thinks  that  he  will  shun 
evils,  because  they  are  sins,  and  supplicates  the  Lord 
for  aid,  the  Lord  removes  them,  and  gives  the  man  to 
desist  from  them  as  of  himself,  and  afterwards  to 
shun  them. 

938s.  It  follows  that  man  cannot  at  all  desist  from 
evils  of  himself ;  for  this  would  be  of  his  own  life  to 
desist  from  his  own  life  ;  wherefore  it  is  provided  that 
he  may  be  able  to  desist  from  them  from  the  Lord.    Ex. 

9392.  The  interior  of  man  is  no  otherwise  purified, 
than  as  he  desists  from  evils  according  to  the  precepts  of 
the  Decalogue  :  in  proportion  as  he  has  not  desisted 
from  these  evils  .  .  .  they  make  his  interior  .  .  . 

9402.  When  the  interior  of  man  is  purified  from  evils, 
by  his  desisting  from  them  .  .  .  the  internal  which  is 
above  it  is  opened  .  .  . 

Desk.      Chartaphylacium.     T.797. 

Desolate.      Desolare. 

Desolation.    Desolatio. 

A.  153.  'They  shall  build  the  wastes  of  eternity,  and 
they  shall  erect  the  olden  desolations,  and  they  shall 
renew  the  cities  of  the  waste,  the  desolations  of  genera- 
tion and  of  generation'  (Is.lxi.4).  '  Wastes '=  evils  ; 
'  desolations, '  falsities. 

411.  In  the  Prophets,  that  is  called  'wasting'  (or 
'vastation')  which  regards  the  celestial  things  of  faith  ; 
and  'desolation,'  that  which  regards  the  spiritual  things 
of  faith.   111. 

427e.  ' Wound '  =  that  faith  is  desolated;  'bruise,' 
that  charity  is  devastated. 

623.  'The  waters  which  they  shall  drink  in  desola- 
tion' (Ezek.xii.  19)  =  the  spiritual  things  to  which  they 
have  done  violence,  or  which  they  have  profaned. 

705.  By  'the  Flood'  is  also  signified  the  desolation  of 
those  who  were  not  able  to  be  regenerated.  Both 
temptations  and  desolations  are  compared  in  the  Word 
to  floods  or  inundations  of  waters.  (111.  as  to  both 
temptations  and  desolations. ) 

e.  The  reason  both  temptations  and  desolations 

are  compared  to  'floods'  ...  is  that  the  case  is  similar. 
It  is  evil  Spirits  who  flow  in  with  their  persuasions  and 
principles  of  falsity  .  .  .  But  with  the  man  who  is  being 
regenerated  there  are  temptations ;  and  with  the  man 
who  is  not  being  regenerated  there  are  desolations. 

790.  Desolations  and  temptations  are  nothing  but  in- 
undations of  the  falsities  which  are  excited  by  evil 
Spirits. 


793.  'Desolation'  is  an  expression  which  relates  to 
spiritual  things  ;  'vastation,'  to  celestial  things. 

19 1 7.  In  temptations  there  are  vastations  and  desola- 
tions .  .  . 

2240.  In  the  Prophets,  when  it  treats  of  vastation 
and  desolation,  it  is  said  that  'they  wail  and  cry.' 

2.  The  desolation  of  faith,  which  is  effected  by 

means  of  falsities.  Tr. 

2454s.  'The  abomination  of  desolation'  (Matt.xxiv. 
15)  =  the  state  of  the  Church  when  there  is  no  love  and 
no  charity.  When  these  are  desolated,  there  reign 
abominable  things. 

2455s.  That  there  is  vastation  is  evident,  for  it  is 
said,  'a  desolation  to  eternity'  (Zeph.ii.9). 

2681.  '(Hagar's)  water  consumed'  (Gen.xxi. I5)  =  the 
desolation  of  truth  (with  the  spiritual).     2689,  Ex.  2694. 

2682.  The  desolation  of  truth  treated  of  in  Job  xxx. 
3,4,6,7  ;  Is.vii.  19. 

2684.  These  words  (concerning  Hagar)  involve  the 
state  of  thought  of  those  who  are  in  the  desolation  of 
truth  and  in  consequent  despair. 

2694s.  They  who  are  being  reformed  are  reduced  into 
ignorance  of  truth,  or  desolation,  even  to  grief  and 
despair,  and  then  first  they  have  comfort  and  help  from 
the  Lord  .  .  .  They  who  are  such  that  they  can  be 
reformed,  if  not  in  the  bodily  life,  in  the  other  life,  are 
brought  into  this  state,  which  in  the  other  life  is  very 
well  known,  and  is  called  vastation  or  desolation. 
They  who  are  in  such  vastation  or  desolation,  arc 
reduced  to  despair,  and  when  they  are  in  this  state,  they 
receive  comfort  and  help  from  the  Lord,  and  are  at  last 
carried  thence  into  Heaven.  .  .  The  cause  of  this  vasta- 
tion and  desolation  is  chiefly  that  the  Persuasive  may 
be  broken  which  they  have  taken  from  proprium  ;  also 
that  they  may  receive  the  perception  of  good  and  truth, 
which  they  cannot  do,  until  that  Persuasive  is  softened 
.  .  .  Examps. 

2699.  The  first  state  after  desolation  is  described  in 
the  preceding  verse,  which  was  a  state  of  consolation 
and  of  the  hope  of  aid.  Their  second  state  after  desola- 
tion is  described  in  this  verse,  which  is  a  state  of 
enlightenment  and  of  recreation  thence.  Ex. 

27024.  The  desolation  of  truth  ;  and  afterwards  the 
consolation,  recreation,  and  instruction  after  desolation, 
are  treated  of  in  Is.xli.  17, 18. 

8.    '  The  land  of  the  north '  ( Jer.  xxxi.  8)  =  ignorance 

or  desolation  of  truth  ;  'weeping'  and  'prayers,'  their 
state  of  grief  and  despair  ;  'to  be  brought  to  fountains 
of  waters,'  recreation  and  instruction  in  truths. 

■ 9.    'Wilderness' (Is. xxxv.  1-7)  =  the  desolation  of 

truth  ;  'waters,'  etc.,  —  the  truths  which  were  for  recrea- 
tion and  joy  with  those  who  have  been  in  vastation. 

27085.  'Wilderness'  .  .  .  =those  who  are  in  vastation 
as  to  good,  and  in  desolation  as  to  truth.  This  'wilder- 
ness '  is  predicated  in  a  twofold  sense,  namely,  of  those 
who  are  afterwards  reformed,  and  of  those  who  cannot 
be  reformed.   111. 

6.  The  journeyings  and  wanderings  of  the  Israel- 

itish  people  in  the  wilderness,  represented  nothing  else 
than  the  vastation  and  desolation  of  the  faithful  before 
reformation,  thus  their  temptation  ;  since  when  they  are 


Desolate 


128 


Desolate 


in  spiritual  temptations,  they  are  in  vastation  and 
desolation.  111. 

[A.]  285 17.  'The  gladness  which  is  desolated'  (Is. 
xxiv.  n)  =  is  predicated  of  truth  .  .  .  Hence  it  is  evident 
what  is  signified  by  'what  is  left  in  the  city  is  a  deso- 
lation' (ver.  12). 

8.   'AH  the  gates  (of  Zion)  are  desolated'  (Lam.i. 

4)  =  that  all  the  approaches  are  beset  by  falsities. 

29282.  'The  inhabited  cities  shall  be  laid  waste,  and 
the  Land  shall  be  desolated'  (Ezek.xii.20).  'The  Land' 
=  the  Church  itself,  which  is  said  to  be  'laid  waste'  as 
to  good  ;  and  '  desolated, '  as  to  truth. 

32404.  'To  pass  the  night  in  the  forest '=to  be  deso- 
lated as  to  good.  .  .  'To  pass  the  night  in  the  forests 
there' =  to  be  no  longer  in  goods,  whence  comes  desola- 
tion, which  is  also  described  by  'wandering  before  the 
swords,  before  the  outstretched  sword.' 

5.    'To  make  them  a  desolation'  (Jer.xxv.  18)  .  .  . 

Here,  the  desolation  of  the  Spiritual  Church  is  treated  of. 

3  39 12.  'A  voice  shall  sing  in  the  window' =  the  desola- 
tion of  truth,  thus  of  the  intellectual  faculty  as  to  truth. 

3652.  'AVhen  ye  shall  see  the  abomination  of  desola- 
tion '  =  the  vastation  of  the  Church.  Ex.  .  .  When  these 
things  are  in  the  Church,  or  rather  in  the  tract  where 
the  Word  is  ;  that  is,  in  the  thought  of  the  heart, 
although  not  in  the  doctrine  of  the  lips,  then  there  is 
desolation  ;  and  these  things  here  mentioned  are  its 
'abomination.' 

3655s.  Here,  now,  it  is  the  third  state  which  is  treated 
of,  which  is  that  of  the  desolation  of  the  Church  as  to 
good  and  truth. 

390ie.  'An  eagle  hastening  to  devour '  =  to  desolate 
man  as  to  truths  ;  for  the  desolation  of  the  Church  is 
here  treated  of. 

4060.  The  desolation  of  truth  is  called  'affliction'  in 
the  Word  throughout. 

527oe.  The  state  when  man  is  apparently  deprived  of 
truths,  is  called  'desolation.' 

5279.  There  is  here  described  (by  the  seven  years  of 
famine)  a  state  of  desolation  through  the  privation  of 
truth  ;  the  last  of  this  state  is  despair.   Ex.     5280. 

5349.  A  state  of  the  multiplication  of  truth  from 
good  .  .  .  before  the  state  of  desolation  which  is  signi- 
fied by  'the  years  of  famine.'  Sig. 

5360.  'The  seven  years  of  famine  began  to  come '  =  the 
following  states  of  desolation.  .  .  ' Famine '  =  the  lack 
of  the  Knowledges  of  truth  and  good,  thus  desolation. 
The  reason  '  famine  '=  this  lack,  or  desolation,  is  that 
there  is  no  other  celestial  and  spiritual  food  but  good 
and  truth  .  .  .  When,  therefore,  such  things  are  lack- 
ing, there  is  famine,  and  in  the  Word  it  is  called 
'desolation'  and  'vastation  ;'  'desolation,'  when  truths 
are  lacking  ;  and  'vastation,'  when  goods  are  lacking. 
In  many  places  in  the  Word  this  desolation  and  vasta- 
tion are  treated  of,  and  are  there  described  by  'the  deso- 
lation of  the  land,'  'of  kingdoms,' of 'cities,'  'of  nations,' 
'of  peoples  ;'  and  it  is  also  called  'exinanition,'  ex- 
cision,' 'consummation,'  'wilderness,'  'emptiness  ; '  and 
the  very  state  itself  is  called  'the  great  day  of  Jehovah,' 
etc.     (See  Day  at  this  ref.) 

e.  This  last  state  of  the  Church,  which  precedes 


the  state  of  the  New  Church,  is  what  is  properly  meant 
and  described  in  the  Word  by  'vastation'  and  'desola- 
tion.' By  'desolation'  and  'vastation'  in  the  Word 
there  is  also  described  the  state  which  precedes  the  re- 
generation of  man  ;  which  state  is  here  signified  by  'the 
seven  years  of  famine. ' 

5362.  'The  famine  was  in  all  lands '  =  desolation 
everywhere  in  the  Natural. 

5369.    'The  famine  was  upon  all  the  faces  of  the  land' 
=  when  there  was  desolation  even  to  despair. 
e.  The  height  and  the  last  of  desolation  is  despair. 

5372.  'The  famine  prevailed  in  the  land  of  Egypt' = 
the  increasing  grievousness  of  the  desolation  in  the 
Natural. 

5376.  'The  famine  prevailed  in  every  land' = that  every- 
where but  there,  there  was  desolation  in  the  Natural. 

.  How  the  case  is  with  the  desolation  of  the 

Natural,  or  with  the  privation  of  truth  there.  Ex. 

8.  When  they  come  nearer  to  the  very  act  of  re- 
generation, they  are  as  it  were  deprived  of  these  truths, 
for  they  are  drawn  inwards,  and  then  the  man  appears 
to  be  in  desolation  ;  but  still  these  truths  are  succes- 
sively remitted  into  the  Natural  .  .  .  But  with  those 
who  are  not  being  regenerated  .  .  .  these  truths  are  cast 
out  .  .  .  This  state  is  also  called  'desolation'  or  'vasta- 
tion ; '  but  it  differs  from  the  former  in  that  the  desola- 
tion of  the  former  state  is  only  apparent,  whereas  the 
desolation  of  this  state  is  absolute  ;  for  in  the  former 
state  the  man  is  not  deprived  of  truths,  whereas  in 
this  state  he  is  utterly  deprived  of  them.  Concerning 
the  desolation  of  the  former  state,  it  has  treated  in  this 
chapter,  and  it  treats  further  in  the  following  one  ;  and 
this  is  what  is  signified  by  'the  seven  years  of  famine.' 
The  same  desolation  is  frequently  treated  of  elsewhere 
in  the  Word.   111. 

5.  How  the  case  is  with  desolation,  is  manifest 

from  those  who  are  in  desolation  in  the  other  life. 
They  who  are  in  desolation  there,  are  harassed  by  evil 
Spirits  and  Genii ;  for  these  infuse  persuasions  of  evil 
and  falsity,  so  that  they  are  almost  inundated  ;  hence 
truths  do  not  appear  ;  but  as  the  time  of  desolation  is 
ended,  they  are  enlightened  by  light  from  Heaven.   Sig. 

6.   In  this  whole  chapter  (Is.xlix. )  it  treats  of  the 

desolation  of  those  who  are  being  regenerated  ;  and  of 
regeneration  and  fructification  after  desolation  ;  and  at 
last  of  the  punishment  of  those  who  have  oppressed. 
Further  ill. 

7.  Desolation  is  for  the  sake  of  the  end  that  man 

may  be  regenerated,  that  is,  that  after  evils  and  falsities 
have  been  separated,  truths  may  be  conjoined  with 
goods,  and  goods  with  truths. 

8.   The  vastation  and  desolation  of  the  man  of  the 

Church,  or  of  the  Church  with  man,  was  represented  by 
the  captivity  of  the  Jewish  people  in  Babylon  .  .  .  for 
desolation  is  captivity,  as  man  is  then  kept  as  it  were 
bound  ;  wherefore  by  those  'bound,'  'in  prison,'  'in  the 
pit,'  are  signified  those  who  are  in  desolation. 

9.  The   state  of  desolation  and   vastation   with 

those  who  are  not  being  regenerated,  is  also  treated  of 
in  the  Word  throughout.  In  this  state  are  those  who 
altogether  deny  truths,  or  turn  them  into  falsities. 
This  is  the  state  of  the  Church  about  the  end.   111. 


Desolate 


129 


Desolate 


5415.  '  Because  the  famine  was  in  the  Land  of  Canaan ' 
=  that  there  was  desolation  as  to  those  things  which  are 
of  the  Church  in  the  Natural.  'Famine'  =  the  lack  of 
Knowledges,  and  consequent  desolation. 

5576.  'And  the  famine  grew  heavier' =  the  desolation 
from  the  need  of  spiritual  things. 

60008.  The  desolation  of  truth  is  treated  of  in  Lam. 
i.2. 

6078.  "When  spiritual  food  is  wanting  to  Good  Spirits 
and  Angels,  they  are  in  desolation  .  .  . 

61 10.   'The  famine  was  very  grievous '  =  desolation. 

.    As   to   desolation,    it   is   to  be  known,    that 

truths  and  goods,  and  the  Knowledges  of  them,  make 
the  spiritual  life  of  those  who  are  in  Heaven  ;  they  are 
their  celestial  and  spiritual  food,  with  which  they  are 
nourished  .  .  .  but  when  it  is  evening,  they  are  lacking 
.  .  .  This  state  is  signified  by  'famine,'  and  it  is  a  species 
of  desolation,  but  not  such  as  is  with  those  in  the 
Lower  Earth. 

61 16.  That  a  true  Scientific  was  no  longer  visible  in 
the  Natural  and  within  the  Church  on  account  of  the 
desolation.  Sig. 

6122.  Truth  is  said  not  to  be  visible,  because  in  a 
state  of  desolation  truth  appears  to  have  fled  away  ;  yet 
it  is  present  .  .  .  But  in  a  state  of  desolation  it  is 
obscured  by  proprium  .  .  . 

6130.  'This  year  was  ended '  =  desolation  after  the 
period  of  this  state. 

6134.  The  good  of  truth  ...  in  like  manner  no  longer 
visible  on  account  of  the  desolation.  Sig. 

6135.  That  the  receptacles  of  good  and  truth  were 
altogether  desolated.  Sig. 

6136.  That  if  they  were  desolated,  there  would  no 
longer  be  spiritual  life  under  the  Internal.  Sig. 

e.    'To  die '  =  desolation,  that  is,  the  privation  of 

good  and  truth,  which  make  the  spiritual  life. 

6138.  The  man  who  is  being  regenerated,  is  at  last  so 
reduced  by  repeated  desolations  and  supports,  that  he 
no  longer  wants  to  be  his  own  .  .  . 

6144.  'The  famine  prevailed  over  them '  =  desolation 
even  to  despair  .  .  . 

.  By  desolations  and   temptations,    also,   states 

contrary  to  heavenly  life  are  perceived,  and  thus  a 
sense  and  perception  of  the  happiness  of  heavenly  life 
is  implanted  .  .  .  Therefore  desolations  and  temptations 
are  brought  to  their  height,  that  is,  to  despair,  in  order 
that  full  relations  may  be  had. 

650S3.  'The  whole  Land  shall  be  in  desolation,  in 
devastation,  and  these  nations  shall  serve  the  king  of 
Babel  seventy  years' (Jer.xxv.  11).  'Seventy  years' =  a 
full  state  of  desolation  and  devastation. 

6726s.  In  Jonah  ii.  5,  there  is  described  a  state  of 
temptations;  'the  waters '  =  falsities  .  .  .  'the  deep'  = 
the  evil  of  falsity  ;  'the  weeds  wrapped  around  the'head' 
=  that  false  scientifics  were  obsessing  truth  and  good : 
so  the  case  is  in  a  state  of  desolations. 

9139.    'When  a  man  shall  desolate  a  field  or  a  vine- 
yard'   (Ex.xxii.4)  =  the   deprivation    of    the    good    and 
truth  of  the  Church  through  cupidities.     'To  desolate' 
=  to  deprive  through  cupidities. 
VOL.  11. 


9141.  'And  shall  desolate  in  the  field  of  another'  (id.) 
=  the  consumption  of  cohering  goods.  'To  desolate'  = 
to  deprive  through  cupidities,  thus  to  consume.  .  .  The 
reason  'to  desolate'  (has  this  signification)  is  that  the 
word  by  which  'to  desolate'  is  expressed  in  the  Original 
Language,  properly  means  to  kindle  and  burn,  thus  also 
to  eat  up  and  consume  ;  and  as  this  is  the  derivation  of 
this  word,  'to  desolate'  here  =  the  consumption  which 
takes  place  through  cupidities  ;  for  the  cupidities  with 
man  are  fires  which  consume. 

3.  Thus  is   described   (in    Ezek.xxxix.9, 10)    the 

consumption  and  desolation  of  good  and  truth  through 
cupidities. 

9334.  'Lest  perad venture  the  Land  be  desolate'  (Ex. 
xxiii.  29)  =  deficiency  in  such  a  case,  and  little  of 
spiritual  life.  .  .  For  'desolate,'  when  said  concerning 
the  Church  in  man,  ■—  the  lack  of  truth  and  good,  thus 
also  the  lack  of  spiritual  life.     E.  65059. 

9348*.  'To  desolate  the  earth  and  the  fulness  thereof 
(Ezek.xix.7)  =  to  destroy  all  things  of  the  Church. 

105824.  It  here  treats  (Is.vii.  19)  of  the  Advent  of 
the  Lord  and  of  the  state  of  the  Church  then,  that  there 
will  be  a  desolation  of  all  things  of  spiritual  truth  and 
good.  .  .  'The  rivers  of  desolations'  =  the  truths  of  doc- 
trine utterly  desolated. 

R.  4782.  Which  state  of  the  Church  is  called  'con- 
summation,' 'devastation,'  'desolation,'  and  'decision.' 

747.  'They  shall  make  her  desolate  and  naked'  (Rev. 
xvii.  16)  =  that  they  will  divest  themselves  of  her  falsities 
and  evils.  .  .  'Desolation'  in  the  Word  is  predicated  of 
truths  and  falsities  ;  and  'nakedness'  of  goods  and  evils. 

M.  803.  'The  abomination  of  desolation '  =  the  falsifi- 
cation and  deprivation  of  all  truth. 

T.  180.  The  infestation  of  truth  by  falsities,  even 
until  there  is  no  truth  remaining  which  is  not  falsified 
and  consummated  ...  is  meant  by  'the  abomination  of 
desolation'  there  :  this  is  meant  also  by  'the  desolation 
upon  the  bird  of  abominations,'  in  Daniel.     755. 

391.  The  desolation  of  truth  and  the  theological 
leanness  in  the  Christian  world  at  this  day.  Des. 

634.  From  that  time  there  commenced  and  increased 
the  desolation  foretold  in  Daniel  and  Matthew. 

75Se-  'Vastation,'  'desolation,'  'decision,'  have  a 
similar  signification  to  'consummation  ;'  but  'desolation' 
=  the  consummation  of  truth  ;  '  vastation, '  the  consum- 
mation of  good  ;  and  'decision,'  the  plenary  consumma- 
tion of  both. 

E.  40537.  'I  will  give  the  Land  a  desolation  and  a 
waste'  (Ezek.xxxiii.28)  .  .  .  'The  desolation  and  vasta- 
tion of  this '  =  the  last  state  of  the  Spiritual  Church, 
which  was  when  there  was  no  longer  any  truth  because 
there  was  no  good,  or  when  there  was  no  faith  because 
there  was  no  charity  ;  'desolation'  is  said  of  the  truth 
which  is  of  faith  ;  and  '  vastation, '  of  the  good  which  is 
of  charity. 

41 710.  The  destruction  of  all  the  goods  of  the  Church, 
is  signified  by  'I  will  cut  off  the  nations,'  and  fey  'their 
corners  shall  be  desolated'  (Zeph.iii.6)  .  .  .  The  destruc- 
tion of  the  truths  of  doctrine  is  signified  by  'I  will 
desolate  their  streets,'  and  by  'their  cities  shall  be 
desolated,' 


Desolate 


130 


Despair 


[E.]  601.  Great  grief  on  account  of  the  desolation  of 
Divine  truth  in  the  Church.  Sig. 

— — .  In  the  following  things  of  this  chapter  (Rev.x.) 
it  treats  of  the  desolation  of  Divine  truth  in  the  Church. 

6 1 7s7.  'A  man  and  his  brother  shall  be  desolated' 
(Ezek.iv.  17)  =  faith  and  charity.  .  .  'To  be  desolated '  = 
the  plenary  extinction  of  both. 

650s3.  'The  flocks  of  small  cattle  are  desolated'  (Joel 
i.  1 8)  =  the  lack  of  the  spiritual  truth  and  good  which 
are  of  faith  and  charity. 

654s9.  That  all  things  of  the  Church  and  all  things  of 
the  doctrine  of  the  Church  will  perish,  is  signified  by 
'they  shall  be  devastated  in  the  midst  of  the  devastated 
lands,  and  her  cities  in  the  midst  of  the  desolate  cities ' 
(Ezek.xxx.7). 

70.  See  Cup-calix-at  this  ref. 

684s9.  'Unto  the  end  of  the  war  the  desolations  are 
determined'  (Dan.ix.26)  =  the  falsification  of  truth  until 
there  is  no  longer  any  combat  between  truth  and  falsity. 
.  .  .  ' Desolation  '  =  the  last  time  of  the  Church,  when 
there  is  no  longer  any  truth,  but  mere  falsity. 

7215.  'More  are  the  sons  of  the  desolate  one  than  the 
sons  of  the  married  one'  (Is.liv.  1).  It  here  treats  of  a 
new  Church  to  be  established  with  the  gentiles  ;  the 
latter  are  signified  by  .  .  .  'the  desolate  one  who  shall 
have  many  sons.' 

7307.  'The  cities  which  are  desolate'  (Jer.iv.26)  = 
doctrinal  things  without  truths. 

7687.  'To  make  the  desolate  cities  inhabited'  (Is.liv. 
3)  =  the  life  according  to  Divine  truths  of  those  things 
which  heretofore  had  been  destroyed.  .  .  'Desolate  cities' 
—  these  truths  heretofore  destroyed  ;  namely,  with  the 
Jewish  nation. 

78 115.  A  lamentation  by  God  concerning  the  desola- 
tion of  truth  in  the  Church  (Lam.iii.8,9, 10, 11). 

9604.  'Devastation '  is  predicated  of  good  ;  'desolation,' 
of  truth. 

110013.  'The  cities  which  are  desolated' (Jer.iv. 26)  = 
that  there  are  no  longer  doctrinal  things  of  truth. 

5  M.  21.  On  the  abomination  of  desolation.  Gen. art. 

22.  The  Novitiates  asked,  How  can  these  things  be 
called  'the  abomination  of  desolation'  ?  The  Angels 
replied,  All  these  are  in  falsities  as  to  faith  and  in  evils 
as  to  life  ;  the  interiors  of  their  minds  are  infernal  .  .  . 
and  as  they  are  in  the  midst  between  the  Heavens  where 
the  Angels  are  and  the  earth  where  men  are,  no  Divine 
truth  can  pass  from  the  Lord  through  the  Heavens  to 
the  men  of  the  Earth  .  .  . 

Can.  Redemp.iv.  1.  The  successive  decrease  of  good 
and  truth  and  increase  of  evil  and  falsity  in  the  Church 
is  called  'vastation'  and  'desolation.' 

Trin.ix.  Hence  is  that  affliction  and  that  desolation 
in  the  Christian  Church,  foretold  by  the  Lord  in  the 
Evangelists  and  in  Daniel. 

Inv.  27.  No  one  can  see  the  desolation  of  truth  in 
the  Church  until  truths  from  the  Word  come  into 
light .  .  . 

Coro.xvii.  This  state  of  the  Church  is  described  by 
'vastation,'  'desolation,' and  'consummation.' 
344.   '  Desolation '  =  this  falsification. 


Despair.     Desperare,  Desperatio. 

A.  383.  'My  iniquity  is  greater  than  I  can  bear '  =  the 
consequent  despair. 

6gge.  (Those  in  the  Lower  Earth)  were  in  despair  .  .  . 

840.  During  temptation  ...  he  is  sometimes  in  such 
despair,  that  he  scarcely  believes  in  the  existence  of  any 
God  .  .  . 

1787.  All  temptation  is  attended  with  some  appear- 
ance of  despair  ;  otherwise  it  is  not  temptation  .  .  . 
They  who  are  being  tempted  are  brought  into  anxieties, 
which  induce  a  state  of  despair  concerning  the  end  :  the 
very  combat  of  temptation  is  nothing  else  ...  As  the 
Lord  endured  the  most  direful  and  cruel  temptations  of 
all,  He,  also,  could  not  but  be  driven  into  despairs, 
which  He  dispelled  and  overcame  by  His  Own  power. 
111.     1917.   2334. 

1796.   In  these  words  there  is  something  of  despair.  .  . 

2682.  '(Hagar)  cast  the  boy  under  one  of  the  shrubs' 
=  despair  that  he  would  perceive  nothing  of  truth  and 
good.  .  .  The  affection  in  this  action  is  despair.  .  .  (This 
signifies)  to  be  desolated  as  to  truth  and  good  even  to 
despair. 

-.  In  this  verse  it  treats  of  the  second  state  of 

those  who  are  being  reformed,  which  is,  that  they  are 
reduced  to  ignorance,  so  that  they  know  nothing  of 
truth,  and  this  even  to  despair.  Ex.     2684e.  26946. 

2694.   'Fear  not' = not  to  despair. 

2.  A  state  of  anxiety  and  of  grief  even  to  despair 

effects  this  (softening).  Ex. 

3.  When  anxiety  and  grief  are  induced  on  them 

from  the  fact  that  they  can  do  nothing  at  all  of  them- 
selves, and  this  even  to  despair,  the  Persuasive  is  broken, 
and  the  state  is  changed  .  .  . 

4.  But  when  they  are  reduced  to  such  a  state  that 

they  perceive  Hell  in  themselves,  and  this  to  such  an 
extent  that  they  despair  that  they  can  ever  be  saved, 
then  for  the  first  time  is  this  Persuasive  broken,  and 
with  it  pride,  and  contempt  for  others  in  comparison 
with  themselves  .  .  . 

2698.  They  who  are  in  internal  grief,  and  in  despair 
from  the  privation  of  truth,  are  elevated  and  supported 
solely  by  means  of  truth,  because  it  is  concerning  this 
that  they  have  grief  and  despair. 

27028.  'Weeping'  and  ' prayers '  =  their-  state  of  grief 
and  despair. 

50365.  (Evil  spirits)  enter  into  the  affections  .  .  .  and 
excite  them,  and  also  the  falsities  and  evils  which  he 
had  thought  and  done,  and  thus  lead  into  anxiety,  and 
frequently  into  doubt  even  to  despair  .  .  .  5246s. 

5279.  'The  famine  shall  consume  the  land'=even  to 
despair.  .  .  The  reason  it  is  even  to  despair,  is  because 
it  is  said  '  the  famine  shall  consume  the  land ; '  for  when 
'the  land' =  the  natural  mind,  and  'famine' the  priva- 
tion of  truth,  nothing  else  is  signified  but  despair  ;  for 
then  consumption  takes  place  in  a  spiritual  manner. 
There  is  here  described  a  state  of  desolation  through  the 
privation  of  truth  ;  the  last  of  this  state  is  despair. 
The  reason  the  last  of  this  state  is  despair,  is  that 
thereby  is  removed  the  delight  of  the  love  of  self  and  of 


Despair 


131 


Despair 


the  world,  and  in  its  stead  there  is  insinuated  the 
delight  of  the  love  of  good  and  truth  ;  for  the  despair 
■with  those  who  are  to  be  regenerated  is  concerning  the 
spiritual  life,  thus  concerning  the  privation  of  truth  and 
good  ;  for  when  they  are  deprived  of  truth  and  good 
they  despair  concerning  the  spiritual  life  ;  hence  they 
have  delight  and  blessedness  when  they  emerge  from 
despair. 

52802.  In  this  verse  it  treats  of  the  last  state  of 
desolation,  with  despair,  which  immediately  precedes 
regeneration.  Ex.     e. 

5369.  'The  famine  was  upon  all  the  faces  of  the  land' 
=with  desolation  even  to  despair. 

e.  The  deepest  and  last  of  desolation  is  despair. 

6144. 

5662.  'He  said,  Peace  be  to  you;  fear  not'=it  is 
well ;  do  not  despair. 

.  As  they  supposed  that  thus  they  would   lose 

their  proprium,  thus  their  freedom,  consequently  all 
the  delight  of  life,  they  were  in  despair. 

6144.  'Because  the  famine  prevailed  upon  them'  = 
desolation  even  to  despair. 

e.  The  sense  and  ^perception  of  happiness  only 

comes  from  the  relation  to  things  contrary  ;  in  order, 
therefore,  that  they  may  have  full  proportions,  desola- 
tions and  temptations  are  brought  to  the  highest,  that 
is,  to  despair. 

6828.  Evil  Spirits  are  also  then  present,  who  introduce 
grief  and  despair  concerning  salvation. 

70904.  If  in  this  world  he  is  brought  into  something 
of  despair,  as  they  who  are  in  combats  are  wont  to  be, 
he  at  once  bursts  these  bonds  (of  conscience). 

7147.  Near  the  end  they  are  infested  more  hardly 
than  before  ;  for  then  truths  are  withdrawn  from  them, 
and  mere  falsities  are  permitted  to  infest  them,  and  this 
even  to  despair  ;  for  it  is  of  Divine  order,  that  the  last 
of  infestation  and  of  temptation  is  despair.  Refs.     e. 

7i55e.  For  they  who  are  in  despair,  as  they  suppose 
that  they  can  no  longer  endure  the  attacks,  they  think 
that  they  can  do  no  otherwise  than  surrender  themselves 
as  captives  to  falsities  ;  for  such  is  the  state  of  despair  ; 
but  they  then  begin  to  be  raised  up. 

7166.  It  is  a  law  of  order  concerning  those  who  are 
being  infested  by  falsities,  that  they  are  to  be  infested 
even  to  despair  ;  and  unless  they  are  infested  to  despair, 
the  last  use  from  infestation  is  wanting.  That  tempta- 
tion is  augmented  even  to  despair,  is  manifestly  evident 
from  the  Lord's  temptation  in  Gethsemane  .  .  .  and 
upon  the  cross  .  .  .  that  He  was  then  brought  even  to  a 
state  of  despair  ;  and  the  temptation  of  the  Lord  is  the 
pattern  of  the  temptations  of  the  faithful.  Sig. 

7217.  'For  straitness  of  spirit' =  011  account  of  a  state 
near  despair  .  .  .  'That  straitness  of  spirit' =  a  state  near 
despair,  is  evident  from  the  fact,  that  they  who  are  in 
a  state  near  despair,  are  in  inward  anxiety,  and  are  then 
actually  in  straitness  of  spirit  (or  of  breath).  Ex. 

7250.  Those  (of  the  giants  of  the  planet  Venus)  who 
are  such  that  they  can  be  saved,  are  in  a  place  of  vasta- 
tion,  and  are  there  reduced  to  the  last  of  despair ;  for 
the  evils  and  falsities  of  that  kind  cannot  otherwise  be 


removed.  When  they  are  in  a  state  of  despair,  they 
cry  out  that  they  are  beasts,  abominations,  etc.  .  .  Some 
of  them  cry  out  against  Heaven  when  they  are  in  such 
a  state ;  but  this  is  excused,  because  it  is  done  from 
despair. 

8164.  'They  said  to  Moses '  =  the  deepest  of  temptation 
aud  also  despair  ...  It  is  said  despair,  because  this  is 
for  the  most  part  the  end  or  for  the  end  of  spiritual 
temptations  .  .  . 

81652.  That  these  words  are  words  of  despair,  is 
evident.  With  those  who  are  in  despair,  which  is  the 
last  of  temptation,  such  things  are  thought .  .  . 

.  Thus  is  he  delivered  from  despair  .  .  . 

8170.  'Moses  said  to  the  people '  —  elevation  from  a 
state  of  despair  by  means  of  truth  Divine. 

817 1.  'Fear  not '  =  despair  not.  .  .  for  the  spiritual 
fear  in  temptations  is  at  first  horror,  and  at  last  is 
despair. 

8313.  Despair  of  enlarging  dominion  felt  by  those 
who  are  in  faith  separated  from  good.  Sig. 

2.  The  reason  'pain,'  here,  =  despair,  is  that  the 

highest  degree  of  pain  is  meant,  such  as  is  that  of  child- 
birth. 111. 

3.   'Pain  as  of  one  in  travail '  =  despair  that  good 

is  being  injured. 

8351.  Spiritual  temptations  are  usually  carried  to 
despair.  Refs.  8567, Refs. 

8567.  'Why  tempt  ye  Jehovah  ?'= that  it  is  against 
the  Divine,  of  whose  aid  they  despaired. 

.  Temptations  are  continual  despairs  concerning 

salvation,  at  first  slight. 

.   In  temptations  the  spiritual  life  is  for  the  most 

part  brought  to  this  extremity,  for  thus  the  natural  life 
is  extinguished  ;  because  in  the  midst  of  despair  the 
inmost  is  kept  by  the  Lord  in  combat  against  what  is 
false  ;  wherefore  this  despair  is  presently  dissipated  by 
means  of  the  comforts  which  are  afterwards  insinuated 
by  the  Lord. 

N.  196.  Hence  the  despair  which  is  at  the  end  (of 
temptations). 

1975.  That  temptations  are  for  the  most  part  carried 
to  despair,  which  is  the  last  of  them.  Refs. 

.  That  in  the  temptation  itself  there   are   also 

despairs,  but  that  they  cease  in  a  general  one.     Ref. 

.  That  in  despair  a  man  says  bitter  things,  but 

that  the  Lord  does  not  attend  to  them.  Ref. 

R.  98.   'Fear    nothing  which    thou    shalt    suffer '  = 
despair  ye  not  when  ye  are  infested  by  evils  and  assaulted 
by  falsities,  because  with  those  who  are  in  goods  as  to. 
life,  and  in  falsities  as  to  doctrine,  it  cannot  be  other- 
wise. 


D.  170.  The  punishment .  .  .  of  self-confidence.  .  .  It 
was  an  interior  pain  with  lamentation,  attended  almost 
with  despair  of  all  salvation  .  .  . 

220.  Their  anxiety  was  doubled,  so  that  they  fell  into 
despair. 

261.  Certain  of  those  who  are  bound  in  the  pit,  are 
not  delivered  until  they  arrive  at  the  last  degree  of 
despair  .  .  . 


Desperately 


132 


Destroy 


[D.]  515.  (In  the  punishment  of  discerption)  his  indig- 
nation ...  is  turned  into  despair,  or  the  thought  of  his 
own  unhappiness,  or  fall. 

699.  They  rejoiced  from  their  inmost  heart,  because 
they  had  been  in  despair  .  .  .     702. 

1042.  They  who  are  being  introduced  into  Heaven, 
are  sometimes  brought  to  the  last  degree  of  despair, 
which  despair  is  the  inmost  of  spiritual  pains. 

1449.  While  they  are  in  such  vastation,  they  have 
damnable  expressions  against  Heaven  .  .  .  because  they 
are  in  despair  .  .  .  But  this  is  excused  .  .  . 

3135.  A  vision  concerning  those  who  are  rashly 
desperate. 

3368.  Yet  he  was  not  evil,  because  there  was  such  a 
sound  and  speech  of  despair  .  .  . 

5568.  They  are  present  for  the  most  part  when  man 
is  in  .  .  .  despairs  .  .  . 

5569s.  They  insinuate  such  things  as  drive  him  to 
despair. 

D.  Min.  4821.  He  came  to  those  who  are  skilled  to 
lead  others  into  despairs,  to  wit,  that  no  one  is  ever 
saved  ...  In  order  that  I  might  know  the  nature  of 
it,  they  came  into  the  anxiety  of  despair. 

E.  5194.  This  involves  despair  concerning  victory, 
such  as  the  Lord  experienced  on  the  cross,  when  He 
said,  'I  thirst,'  and  they  gave  Him  vinegar. 

91112.   'Desperate  grief  (Is.xvii.  11).  Ex. 

Desperately.    Perdite. 

A.  1742.  The  life  which  evil  Spirits  .  .  .  desperately 
love  .  .  . 

Despise.     See  Contemn. 

Despond.     Despondere. 

D.  149.  They  at  once  despond  in  disposition  .  .  . 

Despotic.     Despoticus. 
See  under  Command. 
R.  799e.  Their  former  despotic  domination  .  .  . 

Dessau.     Prince  von  Dessau.    D.4396.  4397. 

Destined.     Destinare. 

A.  3072.  'Her  thou  hast  appointed  for  thy  son 
Isaac'  (Gen.xxiv.  14)  =  the  conjunction  of  truth  Divine 
with  Divine  good  in  the  Rational.  'To  appoint'  for  a 
woman  =  to  conjoin  by  a  covenant  of  marriage. 

L.  182.  (The  notion)  that  He  took  away  the  foreseen 
or  destined  damnation. 


D.  33^3-  Such  was  his  -pvirpose-destinatus. 

4452.  To  what  Hell  these  Sirens  are  destined. 

4459.  Until  they  come  to  their  proper  and  destined 
place. 

Destitute.     Destitutes. 

A.  1506.  Being  deserted  by  his  associates  .  .  . 

D.  426e.  Being  destitute  of  phantasies  .  .  . 

476.  They  are  entirely  destitute  of  understanding. 

507e.  If  he  were  destitute  of  adorers  .  .  . 


970a.  They  were  then  deprived  of  their  spiritual 
food. 

2485e.  Brute  animals,  being  destitute  of  such  a 
faculty  .  .  . 

Destroy.     See  under  Blot  out. 

Destroy.     Destruere. 
Destroyer.     Destructor. 

Destruction.    Destmctio. 
Destructive.     Destructive. 
A.  59.  This  would  be  to  destroy  the  whole  man. 

1587.  The  external  man  destroyed  by  cupidities  of 
evil  and  persuasions  of  falsity.  Sig.  .  .  For  these  two  are 
what  destroy  the  external  man  .  .  .  and  these  two  were 
what  destroyed  the  Most  Ancient  Church  .  .  .  When 
these  two  reign,  the  whole  external  man  is  destroyed, 
and  when  it  is  destroyed  it  is  also  separated  from  the 
internal. 

18202.  Nothing  is  more  delightful  to  them  than  thus 
to  destroy  man. 

4.  They  are    most    delighted    to    destroy    the 

conscience. 

205  73.  Nothing  but  self-love  endeavours  to  destroy 
this  form  and  this  order  .  .  .  Thus  they  destroy  every- 
thing unanimous  and  sociable ;  hence  disunion,  and 
consequently,  destruction. 

4.   Hence  it  is  evident  that  self-love  is  not  only 

destructive  of  the  human  race,  but  also  that  it  is 
destructive  of  heavenly  order. 

29 io4.  (The  causes  of  the  destruction  of  Churches.) 

36144.    'I  have  destroyed  them  in  my  wrath'  (Is.lxiii. 
3)  =  victories  over  falsities. 
4251.   'To  smite '  =  to  destroy. 
4503.   '  To  spoil' =  to  destroy. 
5713.  Hell,  being  in  the  opposite,  destroys  all  things. 

6758.  An  estranged  Scientific  endeavouring  to  destroy 
the  truth  of  the  Church.  Sig. 

.   'To  smite'  =  to  endeavour  to  destroy. 

6858e.  The  infernals  continually  burn  to  destroy  the 
things  of  Heaven  .  .  . 

7293e.  The  endeavour  to  destroy  the  Church.   Sig. 

7554.  Such  destruction  not  with  others  in  the  natural 
mind.  Sig. 

7607.   The  reason  they  cannot  destroy  these  things  .  .  . 

7679.  The  east  wind = a  means  of  destruction. 

8283.   'To  destroy'  (Ex.xv.7)  =  to  reject  as  nothing. 

8295.  That  from  power  Heaven  is  destroyed.   Sig. 

.   'To   drive   out'  =  to   cast   down,    and   thus   to 

destroy. 

.  They    suppose    themselves    able    to     destroy 

Heaven  itself ;  for  all  in  the  Hells  .  .  .  are  thence  in 
the  continual  cupidity  of  destroying  it. 

:2.  The  will  to  destroy  Heaven  ...  is  not  effected 

by  a  hostile  invasion  .  .  .  but  by  the  destruction  of  the 
truth  of  faith  and  the  good  of  love. 

88672.  Such  things  as  are  to  be  avoided,  because  they 
destroy  and  deprive.  Sig  and  Ex. 


Destroy 


133 


Destroy 


S970.  It  treats  in  this  chapter  of  those  things  which 
injure  or  destroy  the  truth  of  faith  or  the  good  of 
charity  with  one's  self  or  with  others.     897ie. 

9256s.  To  destroy  falsities  with  such  is  to  destroy  the 
life  itself.  Ex. 

9320.  'Destroying  thou  wilt  destroy  them'  (Ex.xxiii. 
24)  =  that  evils  are  to  be  entirely  removed.  .  .  The 
reason  'to  destroy '  =  to  remove,  is  that  they  who  are  in 
good  and  truth  never  destroy  those  who  are  in  evil  and 
falsity,  but  only  remove  them ;  the  reason  being  that 
they  act  from  good  and  not  from  evil,  and  good  is  from 
the  Lord,  Who  never  destroys  anyone  :  whereas  they 
who  are  in  evil  and  thence  in  falsity  endeavour  to 
destroy,  and  so  far  as  they  can,  do  destroy  those  who 
are  in  good  ;  the  reason  being  that  they  act  from  evil. 
But  as  they  then  rush  against  the  good  which  is  from 
the  Lord,  thus  against  the  Divine,  they  destroy  them- 
selves, that  is,  precipitate  themselves  into  condemnation 
and  into  Hell. 

2.  The  reason  the  Israelites  and  Jews  destroyed 

the  nations  of  the  Land  of  Canaan.  Ex. 

9336s.  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  the  former  life,  which 
is  of  Hell,  is  to  be  entirely  destroyed,  that  is,  evils  and 
falsities  are  to  be  removed  .  .  . 

.  Hence  it  is  evident,  that  the  life  of  Hell  with 

man  cannot  be  suddenly  destroyed  .  .  . 

9492.  For  the  Hells  continually  breathe  what  is  evil, 
and  endeavour  to  destroy  Heaven.     . 

103005.  That  which  disjoins  also  destroys  ;  hence,  in 
the  opposite  sense,  '  salt  '  =  the  destruction  and  devasta- 
tion of  truth  and  good.  111. 

6.  As  it  destroys  truth  and  good,  it  is  called  'a 

waste  to  eternity.' 

8.  Hence  it  is  evident  that  by  'salt'  ...  in  the 

opposite  sense  is  signified  the  longing  of  falsity  for  evil, 
thus  what  is  destructive. 

105 10.  'To  smite '  =  to  destroy  ;  and  in  the  spiritual 
sense  'to  destroy'  is  to  deprive  some  one  of  the  truths 
and  goods  of  faith  and  love,  which  in  the  Word  is 
called  'desolation'  and  'vastation.' 

H.  3123.  Such  things  with  many  destroy  faith  in  the 
life  after  death  .  .  .  That  they  have  destroyed  it  is 
evident  .  .  . 

399.  These  loves  are  destructive  of  the  delights  with 
others. 

570.  Wherefore,  the  delight  of  their  life  is  to  will  to 
destroy  and  kill  them  .  .  . 

595.  The  sphere  issuing  from  the  Hells  is  entirely  a 
sphere  of  endeavours  to  destroy  the  Divine  of  the  Lord, 
and  thus  Heaven.  The  ebullitions  of  some  of  the  Hells 
were  perceived,  which  were  endeavours  to  emerge  and  to 
destroy. 

J.  Title.  On  the  Last  Judgment,  and  on  the  Babylon 
destroyed. 

60.  How  they  were  destroyed,  and  their  habitations 
made  a  desert.  Des. 

S.  92.  To  confirm  falsities  even  to  the  destruction  of 
genuine  truth  condemns.     96. 

227s.  Such  a  man  is  therefore  destroyed  as  to  all  that 
is  truly  human.  Ex. 


R.  541.  That  they  have  utterly  destroyed  (the  truths 
of  the  Word)  by  applications  to  falsities.  Sig. 

M.  2676.  Theunbridled'loveofself  .  .  .  is  destructive 
of  love  to  the  Lord  ;  and  the  unbridled  love  of  the  world 
...  is  destructive  of  love  towards  the  neighbour. 

T.  2474.  The  Church  with  the  Israelitish  nation  was 
utterly  destroyed  through  falsifications  of  the  Word.  Sig. 

e.  The  Church  is  such  as  is  the  understanding  of 

the  Word  in  it .  .  .  destroyed,  yea,  filthy,  if  the  under- 
standing is  from  truths  falsified. 

772.  That  the  Second  Advent  is  not  to  destroy  any- 
thing .  .  . 


D.  5207.  On  the  destruction  of  Babel.  5229.  5249. 
5269. 

5322.  On  the  total  destruction  of  Babylonia. 
5377.  On  the  destruction  of  the  Old  Heaven. 
5598.  Then  began  their  destruction  .  .  . 
5742.  On  the  destruction  of  the  Old  Heaven  and  earth. 
5856.  On  the  destruction  of  the  subtle  Spirits  from 
the  Mohammedans,  Babylonians,  and  Reformed. 

E.  1 3 15.  'Sword' in  these  passages  =  truth  combating 
and  destroying  :  this  destruction  appears  especially  in 
the  Spiritual  World.  Ex. 

31614.  The  total  vastation  of  the  Church  is  described 
by  'the  Lord  hath  destroyed  the  strongholds  of  the 
daughter  of  Judah'  (Lam.ii.5). 

39 126.  'To  destroy-£>erdere-the  high  places,  to  destroy 
the  altars'  (Ezek.vi.3,4)  =  to  destroy  all  things  of  idola- 
trous worship  through  falsities  and  evils  ;  for  idolatrous 
worship  destroys  itself  thereby;  for  ' sword '=  falsities 
destroying. 

651.  The  destruction  thereby  of  all  the  good  and 
truth  of  the  Church.  Sig. 

.    'To  overcome  and  kill  the  two  witnesses '  =  to 

destroy  the  things  signified  by  the  two  witnesses  .  .  . 

697.  See  DvsTROY-perdere,  at  this  ref. 

72421.  'Destroyers'  and  'devastators'  (Is.xlix.i7)  = 
the  falsities  of  evil. 

74119.  'To  destroy  the  cities  thereof  (Is.xiv.i7)  =  to 
destroy  all  things  of  the  Church.     7305.   102913. 

.  The  destruction  of  the  falsities  which  originate 

from  their  evils.  Sig. 

796.  Destruction  even  until  there  was  nothing  of 
truth  and  good  remaining.  Sig. 

.   'The  Power  of  doing '  =  the  act  of  destroying 

goods  and  truths. 

797.  'Blasphemy  '  =  the  falsification  of  the  Word  even 
to  the  destruction  of  Divine  truth. 

880.  Devastation  and  destruction  as  to  all  things  of 
doctrine  with  them.  Sig. 

Destroy.     Interire. 
Destruction.     Interitus. 

A.  1886,  Pref.2.  (Believe)  that  then  all  things  will  be 
destroyed.     3353. 

21 17.  They  suppose  that  then  the  destruction  of  the 
world  will  come  .  .  .     4535.  50785. 


Destroy 


134 


Destroy 


[A.]  2118.  The  destruction  of  the  Most  Ancient  Church 
is  described  by  the  Flood. 

2135,  Pref.  The  Last  Judgment  is  not  the  destruction 
of  the  world  .  .  .     4059. 

69072.  This   is  represented    by   the    destruction    of 
Pharaoh  and  the  Egyptians  in  the  Red  Sea. 

821 1.  The  state  of  thick  darkness  and  destruction  of 
those  who  are  in  falsity  from  evil.  Sig. 

94002.  If  there  were  no  conjunction,  the  human  race 
on  this  earth  would  entirely  perish. 

H.  312.  The  opinion  that  all  visible  things  will  then 
be  destroyed  .  .  . 

J.  1.  That  the  destruction  of  the  world  is  not  meant 
by  the  day  of  the  Last  Judgment.  Gen. art.     D.4391. 

S202e. 

R.  734.   'To  go  into  destruction'  (Rev.xvii.8)  =  to  be 
rejected.     E.  1055. 

876.  The  dogma  concerning  the   destruction  of  the 
world  .  .  . 


5  M.  8.   On  the  destruction  of  the  world,  etc. 

Destroy.     Labefactare. 
Weakening.     Labefadatio. 

H.  ioie.  Man  has  overthrown  and  destroy  cd-destruxit 
order. 

P.  1805.  The  external  of  the  thought  and  will  become 
vitiated  and  destroyed. 

M.  352.  All  the  Heavens  would  be  so  severely  shaken 
that  the  Angels  could  not  subsist. 

361.   From  the  privation  of  this  love,  that  whole  form 
would  be  ruined. 

373.  Fear  lest  the  domestic  affairs  should  be  destroyed. 
T.  I192.  At  last  the  internal  man  is  destroyed. 
321.  His    honour,    name,    and    reputation  .  .  .  are 
destroyed. 


D-  5993a-  As  the  affection  of  their  life  and  its  delight 
began  thus  to  be  destroyed  .  .  . 

E.  4132.  Then  the  Lord  directs  His  love  ...  to  restore 
the  state  which  labours  and  begins  to  be  destroyed. 

7024.  As  thereby  the  ultimate  Heaven  .  .  .  began  to 
be  shaken'.  .  . 

Ath.  122.  That  Heaven  was  shaken  by  conjunction 
with  the  Hells  in  its  ultimates,  may  be  illustrated  by 
the  extreme  weakening  of  a  man,  from  which  at  last 
he  dies. 

Can.  God  vii.  13a.  In  proportion  as  ends  opposite  to 
love  do  not  obstruct  and  destroy  .  .  . 

14a.  Provides  lest  ends  from  opposite  loves  ...  do  not 
ruin  the  work  of  creation  even  to  utter  destruction- 
internecionem. 

Destroy.     Perdere,  Deperdere. 

Destroyer.    Perditor. 
Destruction,  Perdition.    Perditio. 

See  DESPERATELY-perefo'te. 

A.  637.   'I  will  destroy  them  with  the  earth'  (Gen.vi. 


13)  =  that    the    human    race    would    perish    with    the 
Church.  Ex. 

929.  That  man  could  no  longer  so  destroy  himself.  Sig. 

9333.  For  the  will  of  man  is  utterly  destroyed  .  .  . 
.  88062. 

2395.  'Because  we  destroy  this  place'  (Gen.xix.  13)  = 
that  the  state  of  evil  in  which  they  were  would  damn 
them.  'To  destroy,'  when  predicated  of